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Full text of "History of St. Paul's church, Buffalo, N. Y., 1817 to 1888"

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181M901 




CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 




Cornell University Library 
BX 5980.B9S29 



History of St. Paul's church, Buffalo, N 




3 1924 007 766 425 



CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 



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The original of this book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



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From a pliotoprapli taken by Ghtmar 
Fr^res, Brussels, Uelf^ium, during Dr. Shel- 
ton's second trip to Europe in 1864-65, at 
the age of sixty-six years 



Iblstor^ of 

©t pauTe Cburcb 

Buffalo, IR. 15. 



1817 to 1888. 



BY 

CHARLES W. EVANS, 

One of the Wardens, from 1863 until his death, February 8, i8i 



Edited, with Foot Notes, Occasional Additions in the Text, and a 
Continuation of the History from 



1888 to 1903. 



With Chapters on : The Restored St. Paul's ; The 
Memorials; The Ivy; The Chimes of St. Paul's; 
The Great Tower and Spire; The Music, 1817-1903; 
Historical Notes, 1817-1903; List of the Clergy, 
1817-1903; List of the Vestry, 1817-1903 ; The 
Architects of St. Paul's ; Subscription Lists, Etc. 

BY 

ALICE M. EVANS BARTLETT 

and 

G. HUNTER BARTLETT. 



Mltb SiitMour UUustrations. 



The Matthews-Northrup Works, 
buffalo and new york. 

1903. 



Copyright, igo3, by 
Alice M. Evans Bartlett 
AND G. Hunter Bartlett. 



To THE Memory 

OF THE 

IRev. IKHmiam Sbclton, 2). D. 

Rector of 
ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, BUFFALO, N. V., 

1829 TO 1882, 

This History is Affectionately Inscribed 

HY 

THE AUTHOR. 



IPreface. 



THE History of St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, was first suggested by 
the vestry June 7, 1841, but beyond the collection of some useful 
memoranda nothing was done. From 1847 to 1887 the minutes 
of the vestry were recorded in somewhat of a historical form. In 1886 
it was suggested to the undersigned to write a history of the parish — 
and having been called by his fellow parishioners, at different times 
during the past forty years, to all the important offices of the parish — 
first as clerk of the vestry, then as treasurer of the parish, then as one 
of the vestry, and subsequently as junior warden, and, finally, as senior 
warden — he became possessed, in the exercise of the duties of these 
different offices, of considerable knowledge of parish history, by tradi- 
tion as well as by examination of the records, the result of all of which 
is this history. He hopes it will be favorably received by the present 
parishioners. Of course, the central figure is our late rector, the Rev. 
Dr. Shelton ; and such parishioners are named as have made more 
or less of parish history, or have been instrumental in advancing its 
interests. The chronological form was thought to be the best adapted 
in showing the progress of the parish from its organization in 1817, 
through its days of adversity, then in its more comfortable circum- 
stances, and finally, through the large expenditures in building the 
church edifice, to its present prosperous condition. 

CHARLES W. EVANS. 
Buffalo, N. Y., January, 1888. 



Charles W. Evans died February 8, 1889, in the seventy-seventh year of his age, 
leaving the History referred to above in manuscript. 

The Dedication to the Rev. Dr. Shelton, the Preface and the full text of the "History 
of St. Paul's Church, Buffalo," by Mr. Evans, from 181 7 to 1888 (pages 7 to 159 in 
this volume) are given as he left them in manuscript. It was his expressed wish that 
the present editors should prepare this part of the book for the press. Footnotes have 



Preface. 

been added wherever the interest of the narrative seemed increased thereby. We 
have also thought best to add such paragraphs as might serve to fill out the details 
of the story for present-day readers, and have therefore inserted in Mr. Evans's text 
extracts from Dr. Shelton's first sermon in the new church in 1851 (p. 73)> ^""^ 
portions of the sermons by Bishop Coxe and the Rev. Dr. Brown on the death of 
Dr. Shelton (p. 150, 147), also a description of the church, published in 1851 (p. 68), 
written by the Rev. Dr. Charles Wells Hayes, who was present at the consecration in 
that year. Further details have also been added in some of the obituary accounts of 
parishioners, and elsewhere. 

Also in accordance with Mr. Evans's desire, we have continued the History from 
January 1888, bringing it down to April, 1903. The work of preparing the book was 
begun shortly after Mr. Evans's death, and has been carried on, with unavoidable 
interruptions and delays, until now. The obtaining of reliable data in many instances 
has taken much time. The expected task of a few years has extended, a labor of love, 
over many years. The architectural description of the Restored Church, the chapters 
on The Memorials, The Chimes, The Tower, and The Music, the Historical Notes, 
and the various lists, have all been added as bearing on the history of the parish, and 
as worthy of preservation in a volume devoted to its annals. 

Much time and care have been given in searching out the facts, and in verifying the 
dates, names, and other details of this history, both by verbal and written inquiry, and 
in the examination of the vestry records, treasurers' books, many old documents, old 
letters, and newspaper files. The records of the city and county, the Bureau of Vital 
Statistics, and the Buffalo Historical Society, etc. , have also been frequently consulted. 
Some errors are, however, unavoidable in a book of this kind, especially when it is 
remembered that minor inaccuracies and omissions exist in the original records and 
documents themselves. We have also prepared and added an analytical Index, with 
cross references. 

In the brief obituary accounts given in this volume of members of the parish who 
have passed away, only those who were parochial officers, or who were in some other 
way prominently identified with the growth and work of St. Paul's, during the eighty- 
six years covered by this history, have been mentioned. Of the great majority of the 
army of faithful parishioners who now rest from their labors, it has been impossible to 
give here even the names. 

The history of St. Paul's parish, beginning as it does almost with the beginnings of 
Buffalo itself, affords glimpses of the old village life of our city, of the days when "the 
burning " was in everyone's mind as an event of yesterday, and when the regions north 
of Chippewa Street were still haunted by the legendary spirits of the fields and woods. 

We wish to acknowledge the manifold courtesies received from the Rector and the 
vestry, and from many members of the parish and others, in the preparation of this 
History for the press. 

The work is published by Mr. Evans's wife and family, in fulfillment of his long- 
cherished wish. ALICE M. EVANS BARTLETT. 
Buffalo, N. Y., April 16, 1903. G. HUNTER BARTLETT. 



(Tontents. 



Pages. 

History of St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, February lo, 1817, to January i, 1888, 7-159 

Continuation of the History of St. Paul's Church, January i, 1888, to April 

16, 1903 163-263 

The Restored St. Paul's, 265-278 

The Memorials, . . . .... 278-298 

The Ivy, 298, 299 

The Chimes of St. Paul's, 299-313 

The Great Tower and Spire 314-318 

The Music at St. Paul's, 1817-1903, . . . 319-356 

Historical Notes, 1817-1903, . ... 357-395 

St. Paul's Church, Historical Outline, 1817-1903, . . . 357-360 

The Seal of the Corporation, , . 360, 361 

The first Roman Catholic Mass in Buffalo, .... . . 361 

Notes on the early Rectors, . . 361-365 

Extracts from some early letters, from the Rev. Addison Searle, 

Rector of St. Paul's, to Bishop Hobart, etc., 365,366 

Major Noah's City 366-369 

Accounts and Anecdotes of the Rev. Dr. Shelton, . . 369-383 

Early years of the Church in Buffalo, . . .... . . 383-385 

The Bank of England and St. Paul's, 385, 386 

Account of the formation of a free church for lakemen and others, 386-388 

Removal of the frame church, 1850 388, 389 

The numbering of the Pearl Street Rectory, . .... 389, 390 

The Wooden Model of St. Paul's, 390-392 

Notes on the Sunday School, 392 

St. Paul's Guild, 392-394 

From Minutes of the Building Committee, after the fire of 1888, 394, 395 

List of the Clergy in St. Paul's Church, 1817-1903, 396 

List of the Wardens and Vestrymen of St. Paul's Church, 1817-1903, . . 397-420 

The Architects of St. Paul's, 1819-1890 421-426 

Subscription Lists, . . . 426-439 

In Conclusion, . . 44°> 44' 

Index, 443-472 



If llusttations. 



Portrait of the Rev. Dr. Shelton, taken in Brussels, Belgium, at the age 

of 66 years, with autograph, Frontispiece. 

Page. 

Reduced facsimile of receipt given at first sale of pews, November 24, 1820, . . 6 
Reduced facsimile of original Organization Paper of St. Paul's Church, February 

10, 1817, 8 

The Rt. Rev. John Henry Hobart, D. D., 12 

Reduced facsimile of autograph letter of Joseph EUicott to the vestry. May 20, 

1819, 14 

Map of Buffalo Village 16 

Reduced facsimiles of pew deeds in 1823 and 1826, ... 22 

Plan of original frame church of St. Paul's, as built in 18 19, with names of pew 

holders in 1827 . . . ... 30 

St. Paul's frame church from Main Street 32 

Original Altar, Chancel-rail, reading-desk, pulpit and font, in frame church, with 

plan of chancel 34 

"The Churches" in 1838 (from Buckingham's "America"), 38 

Easterly end of interior of St. Paul's frame church, showing the organ, 1829-50, 38 

The Rev. William Shelton at about the age of 35 years, 40 

Plan of galleries, basement, and part of south aisle, St. Paul's frame church, . . 44 
"The Churches" in 1838 (from title page of "Buffalo City Guards Grand 

March"), 46 

Reduced facsimiles of stock certificate and pew deed, St. Paul's Church, 1849-51, 54 

Plan of St. Paul's frame church, with names of pew holders in 1849, • • 5^ 

The Rev. Dr. Shelton at about the age of 52 60 

Reduced facsimiles of the two lithographic drawings of St. Paul's, published in 

1851 68 

Reduced facsimile of the lithographed plan of church in 185 1, with names of 

pew holders at Easter, 1857 84 

The Rev. Dr. Shelton, from a photograph taken about the early '6o's, .... 88 

The Rt. Rev. William Heathcote DeLancey, D. D., LL. D., 96 

The Rt. Rev. Arthur Cleveland Coxe, D. D., LL. D 98 

St. Paul's from Main Street, in 1867, before the spires were built 104 

St. Paul's from South Division Street, in 1870, just before the completion of the 

main spire 106 



Illustrations. 

Page. 
General view of Buffalo in 1870, looking north, from scaffolding on main spire 

of St. Paul's 108 

St. Paul's from Main Street in 1870, after the completion of the main spire, . . no 

The Rev. Dr. Shelton in his 72d year 114 

General view of St. Paul's and the city, from the tower of the City Hall (1875), n^ 

The Rev. Dr. Shelton in his 80th year, from the Sellstedt portrait, 124 

The Rev. Dr. Shelton in the chancel of St. Paul's, February, 1881, in his 83d year, 128 

The Rev. John Wesley Brown, D. D., from a crayon drawing, . . ... 136 

Plan of St. Paul's, and names of pew holders in 1883 138 

"The Chinches" in 1884, 152 

Interior of St. Paul's, looking east from the west organ gallery, 1884, ... 154 
The first Shelton Memorial Windows at St. Paul's. The Rev. Dr. Brown in the 

chancel, 1887 . . . . 156 

Repointing the main spire in 1886, ... 160 

The ruins of St. Paul's from Main Street, 1888 i6i 

Interior view of ruins of St. Paul's, looking east from the west organ gallery, . . 166 

Interior view of ruins of St. Paul's, looking west from the chancel j68 

The Restored St. Paul's, from Main Street, ... . . .182 

The Rev. J. A. Regester, S. T. D ,94 

The present Rectory of St. Paul's, 61 Johnson's Park, . 200 

Bishop Coxe, about 1892 204 

Bishop Walker 212 

Dr. Shelton's Rectory, 128 Pearl Street, ... 216 

The present Parish House, 128 Pearl Street, 216 

Plan of Restored St. Paul's, and names of pew holders in 1902, 21:0 

Plan of St. Paul's Church and lot in 1902, showing triangles of land deeded to the 

church in that year, z^a 

The Restored St. Paul's, from site of Prudential Building . . 26^ 

The Restored St. Paul's, Interior, looking east from main vestibule 272 

The Restored St. Paul's, looking west from the Chancel, ... ... 278 

The Restored St. Paul's, from the northwest corner of Pearl and Church streets 208 

In the belfry of the Great Tower ^q . 

At the keyboard in the Chimers' room, . _ ^^^ 

The Restored St. Paul's, from the corner of Pearl and Swan streets, showing the 

Great Tower and Spire, ,j . 

The Restored St. Paul's, Interior, showing the Chancel and the vested choir, . . 31:2 

The seal of the Corporation of St. Paul's Church . , ^g,-, 

Corner stone of the City of Ararat (1825) ,gQ 

The German-Evangelical St. Peter's Church, formerly old St. Paul's, . . .388 

Views of the wooden model of St. Paul's, 1850 ,qq 

St. Paul's and its environment, 1902 (views from South Division Street and from 

the Erie County Savings Bank Building), . . ^.q 

(Added too late for insertion above.) 
Monument to the memory of the Rev. Addison Searle, Mount Auburn Cemetery, 

Cambridge, Mass .... 366 



IDistor? of St. Ipaul's (Tburcb. 

Kuffalo, 11. jp. 



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*\\^^^^ tncrcon *S^^ fftfUA^J^ •and itiat tnn- hantntnt rJ l/ic furiAcr-' 



REDUCED FACSIMILE OF RECEIPT. 
Given at first sale of pews, November 24, 1820. (See page 16.) 



1bt8tori2 of St. ipauTs Cbutcb, 



Buffalo, f\. 13. 






EFORE beginning the history of this parish it may 
be interesting to note the rise and progress of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in what is now the 
Diocese of Western New York. That rise and prog- 
ress was born of the missionary spirit, which has ever 
been in the church, and it has been observed that its 
most efficient progress has been from the east to the west. Bishop 
Hobart, although the Bishop of New York, was at the same time a 
zealous missionary bishop. In his address to the Diocesan Convention 
in the city of New York in October, 1814, he said that too much value 
cannot be placed on missionary services, and there is no object of more 
importance to the general interests of religion and to the prosperity of 
the church, and none more strongly demanded by the spirit and pre- 
cepts of the Gospel, than the encouragement of missionary labors. 

Buffalo was laid out in the year 1804, by Joseph Ellicott, as agent 
of the Holland Land Company, and was then called New Amsterdam. 
Its principal streets were named after the proprietors of the company, 
and its less important ones after Indian tribes, but most of these names 
were changed in after years. 

The place itself was called Buffalo as early as 1812, at which time 
it became a military post in the war between the United States and 
England. It was burnt by the English, December 30, 1813. In 
1810, it had a population of 1,500 ; but in 1814, the next year after 
it was burned, the population was only 1,000. At the time of 



8 History of St. Paul's Church. 

the organization of St. Paul's Church, in 1817, Buffalo contained 
100 houses, several of them being of brick. The population had 
increased to 2,000 in 1820, and on the completion of the Erie 
Canal, in 1825, to S,ooo ; in 1832, it was incorporated as a city, with 
a population of 10,000. 

The church in Western New York showed a marked increase under 
Bishop Hobart, and every year its missionaries extended their visits 
more and more westward from the Genesee River. From 1815 to 1817 
we find ministerial acts recorded by the Rev. Alanson Welton, Rev. 
George H. Norton, Rev. Samuel Johnston, and Rev. Wm. A. Clark. 

The first Episcopal Church on the Holland Land Purchase was 
organized in 181 1, in the town of Sheldon, Genesee County, and Bishop 
Hobart visited it when there was no other west of Allen's Hill in 
Ontario County, N. Y. The first baptism recorded in Buffalo was that 
of Mary Tillinghast Leake, daughter of Isaac Q.and Catherine Leake, 
on October 19, 18 12, at the house of her parents. The next was that 
of their son, Godfrey Wilson Leake, on April 4, 1815. The Rev. 
Samuel Johnston baptized John Smith Trowbridge, the son of Doctor 
Josiah and Margaret Trowbridge, on February 23, 1817 ; Dr. Trow- 
bridge came to Buffalo in 181 1. The Rev. Mr. Johnston also bap- 
tized Catherine, wife of Sheldon Thompson, on March 2, 1817. 



1817. 

The certificate of incorporation of St. Paul's Church states that a 
meeting of the members of the Protestant Episcopal Church, of the 
village of Buffalo, in the county of Niagara, was assembled at Elias 
Ransom's tavern in the said village on Monday, February 10, 1817, in 
pursuance of notice for that purpose given during morning service on 
two preceding Sundays, and in compliance with "An act to provide 
for the incorporation of Religious Societies," passed by the Legislature 
of the State of New York, in the year 1813. The Rev. Samuel John- 



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REDIXED FACSIMILE OF ORIGINAL ORGANIZATION PAPER i iF ST. PAL^L'S CHURCH. 

February lo, 1S17. (Seepage 8.1 



History of St. Paul's Church. g 

ston being called to the chair, divine service was held, after which 
came the election of wardens and vestrymen ; Erastus Granger and 
Isaac Q. Leake being elected wardens, and Samuel Tupper, Sheldon 
Thompson, Elias Ransom, John G. Camp, Henry M. Campbell, John 
S. Larned, Jonas Harrison, and Josiah Trowbridge, vestrymen. At the 
same time it was unanimously resolved : " That Easter Monday, here- 
after, be the day for the annual election of their successors,* and that 
the said church be known and distinguished by the name of St. Paul's 
Church in Buffalo." The certificate bears date February lo, 1817, 
and is signed by Samuel Johnston, chairman; in the presence of George 
Badger and Jacob A. Barker, members of the said church. Their 
acknowledgments were taken by Oliver Forward, Judge of the Com- 
mon Pleas, Niagara County ; and the certificate was recorded in 
Niagara County Clerk's office in Buffalo, on February 10, 1817, at five 
o'clock P. M., in Liber i of Miscellaneous Records, at page 31. 

Erie County was separated from Niagara County in the year 182 1, 
and Buffalo became its county seat ; Lockport being the county seat 
of Niagara County. 

The tavern of Elias Ransom, in which this meeting was held, was 
on the northwest corner of Main and Huron streets, and was one of 
the most popular houses of its kind in Buffalo. 

The following residents of Buffalo signed a paper,f dated February 
10, 1817, in which they agreed to become members of St. Paul's Church, 
and to conform to the rites and ceremonies of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church : Elias Ransom, John Root, Smith H. Salisbury, John G. 
Camp, Jonas Harrison, Isaac Q. Leake, Josiah Trowbridge, Jacob A. 
Barker, Sheldon Thompson, Ebenezer Johnson, David Brown, Henry 
M. Campbell, James Campbell, Eben Beach, Samuel Tupper, Elihu 
Alvord, John S. Larned, George Badger, S. P. Beebe, Elias Ransom, Jr., 
John A. Cofifin, F. W. G. Camp ; in addition to these, the following per- 
sons were members : David M. Day of Buffalo, Mrs. Elias Ransom and 
four children, Mrs. John G. Camp, Mrs. Henry M. Campbell and Miss 

*In accordance with this resolution a second vestry election was held a few weeks 
later, on Easter Monday, April 7, 1817. All the members of the original vestry were 
reelected at this time. 

t See the reproduction of the original paper, opposite page 8. 



lo History of St. Paul's Church. 

Campbell, Mrs. J. S. Larned and two children, Mrs. Josiah Trowbridge 
and son, Mrs. Jonas Harrison and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Oliver For- 
ward, J. Josephs, Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt and child, John Lay, Jr., Mrs. Eben- 
ezer Johnson, Zenas W. Barker, James Remington, and George Badger. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry, Erastus Granger and Dr. 
Josiah Trowbridge were appointed a committee to wait upon Joseph 
Ellicott, agent of the Holland Land Company, to ask for such dona- 
tion and assistance as he might be disposed to grant, and to confer 
with him on the subject of a burial ground for the society, and for a 
lot on which to build the proposed church. 

The Rev. Samuel Johnston was instructed to write to Bishop 
Hobart, requesting the aid and assistance of Trinity Church in New 
York. 

Mr. Erastus Granger waited on Joseph Ellicott to solicit a donation 
of one of the company's lots in Buffalo. Mr. Ellicott expressed sur- 
prise that Mr. Granger from New England should be with the Episco- 
palians. Mr. Granger said his wife was an Episcopalian. Mr. Ellicott 
said he knew Mrs. Granger when she was a little girl in Canandaigua, 
and there was no church there, but it transpired that the little girl 
had been brought up in church principles by private instruction. 
Mr. Ellicott was the local agent of the Holland Land Company in 
Batavia, N. Y., and Paul Busti was the general agent in Philadelphia. 
The proprietors of the company were liberal in their grants of land 
to all religious societies, and school districts, and for roads. They 
sold the land to actual settlers at very low prices, and on extended 
terms of payment. Five dollars was accepted by them as the first 
payment. They refused to sell lots in Buffalo unless the purchasers 
erected a building. In the first settlements of Western New York, 
Canadaigua was the official residence of the agent and surveyors 
of the different land companies, and afterwards Batavia became 
the residence of the surveyors and land agents of the Holland 
Land Company. Niagara County comprised what was afterwards 
Niagara, Erie, Chautauqua and Cattaraugus counties. Prior to 1820 



History of St. Paul 's Church. 1 1 

many persons, in visiting Western New York, had letters of introduc- 
tion to the agent of the Holland Land Company. W. J. Walter, a 
merchant in Schenectady, N. Y., under date of October 2, 1816, writes 
to Mr. Ellicott, recommending to his " favor Mr. Samuel Johnston, who 
visits your country on missionary purposes, and, as he is a stranger, 
may stand in need of information and advice. He is a young man of 
the strictest integrity." 

In the Diocesan Convention held in Trinity Church, New York, 
October 21, 1817, the certificate of incorporation of St. Paul's Church 
of Buffalo was read, and the said church was received into union with 
the convention. The Rev. Samuel Johnston, deacon and missionary in 
Genesee and Niagara counties, reported to Bishop Hobart that he 
arrived in Batavia October 16, 181 6, and, agreeable to directions, de- 
voted the most of the time there, officiating twenty Sundays in Batavia, 
ten at Buffalo, four at Le Roy, two at Sheldon, and, at the request of 
some members of the Church of England, while at Buffalo, crossed 
over to the British lines and held several evening services at Fort 
Erie and at Waterloo, and baptized twelve children. He also reported 
that on the loth of February, 1817, he organized a church in the 
flourishing village of Buffalo, by the name of St. Paul's Church in Buf- 
falo, and that about twenty families attached themselves to it. He 
further reported their readiness to cooperate with his exertions, and 
that their animated zeal was truly praiseworthy. Five thousand dollars 
were immediately subscribed towards building a church, but being- 
disappointed in receiving payment for the losses of their buildings in 
the recent war, the work was deferred. They still continued zealous. 
Mr. Johnston having returned to the East, the Rev. George H. Norton, 
deacon, reported to Bishop Hobart that he had officiated four times 
at Buffalo. The salary of the Rev. Samuel Johnston as missionary 
was paid from funds procured by the New York " Protestant Episco- 
pal Society of Young Men." On the 23d of October, 1817, Bishop 
Hobart admitted the Rev. Samuel Johnston to the order of priests, and 
he afterwards removed to Ohio, by letters dimissory from the bishop. 



12 History of St. Paul's Church. 

We thus see that St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, and other parishes in 
Western New York really owe their origin to the missionary efforts 
and zeal of Bishop Hobart. In September, 1817, he visited St. Paul's 
Church, Buffalo, and reported to the convention of 1818 that the Rev. 
William A. Clark, for several years missionary at Manlius, Onondaga 
County, N.Y., had removed to Buffalo, and was also employed in Batavia, 
N. Y.; and the Rev. Alanson Welton, missionary in Ontario County, 
N. Y., reported to the bishop that he had spent eight Sundays in 
Buffalo. 

In the convention of 18 19 the bishop reported that the annual 
stipend allowed to each missionary was only $175, the remainder of 
their support depending on the contributions of the congregations 
among whom they officiated. 

The collections in the Diocese of New York, as reported to the 
convention for the year ending October i, 1819, were only $1,475.10, 
of which Trinity Church and its two chapels in the City of New York 
contributed $326.76. The Episcopate fund as invested for the sup- 
port of the Episcopate was only $[9,650.17. The bishop derived his 
support from Trinity Church, New York, as its rector. In 1819 the 
population of the City of New York was only about 122,000. 



1818. 

At the annual election of wardens and vestrymen of St. Paul's 
Church, held at the house of Elias Ransom, March 23, 1818, 
Dr. Josiah Trowbridge was chosen chairman, Isaac Q. Leake and 
Henry M. Campbell were elected wardens, and John S. Earned, 
Sheldon Thompson, Elias Ransom, John G. Camp, Jonas Harrison, 
Josiah Trowbridge, William J. Caldwell and Staley N. Clarke 
vestrymen. 

It may be interesting to state that George W. Doane, afterwards 
Bishop of New Jersey, was a candidate for orders in the diocese of 




The Right Re\erend JOHN HENRY HOBART. D. D., 

Third Bishop of the Diocese of New York ( State i. 

Born, 1775 ; Consecrated, iSn ; Died, 1830, 



From the engraving by J. VV. Paradise 
after the painting by J Paradise, published 
in "The Evergreen" for December, 1844, 



History of St. Paul's Church. 13 

New York in 181 8, and that William H. DeLancey, afterwards Bishop 
of Western New York, was also a candidate for orders in the Diocese 
of New York in 1819. 

Doctor Cyrenius Chapin was not present at the organization of St. 
Paul's Church. He and his family were then residing temporarily in 
Geneva, N. Y., but returned to Buffalo in 1819. He was one of the 
brave defenders of Buffalo at its burning by the British in December, 
1813. George and Thaddeus Weed were in the congregation in 1819. 
Thaddeus Weed afterwards married Louisa M., the daughter of Doctor 
Chapin, and she has been a parishioner since 1818.* 



Subscription for building the church edifice in Buffalo, i8i8 ; 

" We, whose names are subscribed, promise to pay, when called on, 
to the wardens and vestry of St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, the respective 
sums marked opposite our names, for the purpose of building a church 
in the village of Buffalo, during the present season, and when said 
church shall have been completed we are to be reimbursed the said 
sums by the sales of the pews and seats in said church. 



Cyrenius Chapin, 
Jonas Harrison, 
William J. Caldwell, 
G. and T. Weed, 
John S. Lamed, 
John G. Camp, . 
Ebenezer Johnson, 
Henry Kip, . . 
Ebenezer Reed, . 
Erastus Gilbert, . 
Nathaniel Vosburg, 
John Root, . . 
Elias Ransom, . 
Joseph Landon, . 



. $150.00 Charles Phihps, . 

100.00 William C. House, 

50.00 Joseph EUicott, for Holland 

50.00 Land Co., 

50.00 Joseph EUicott, for the Holland 
100.00 Co., Niagara Bank money, 

50.00 William Mason, ... 

50.00 Smith H. Salisbury, 

20.00 John Lay, Jr., 

20.00 Oliver Forward, . 

20,00 H. M. Campbell, 

50.00 James Sheldon, . 

100.00 F. B. Merrill, 

25.00 Sylvester Matthews, 



f 4.00 
25.00 



300.00 

1. 00 

50.00 

100.00 

100.00 

50.00 

50.00 

50.00 

20.00 



11,785.00 



* Mrs. Louisa M. Weed died July 20, 1894. (See page 199.) 



14 History of St. Paul's Church. 



1819. 

May 20, 1819, Joseph Ellicott, agent of the Holland Land Com- 
pany, informed the vestry of St. Paul's that, having been called on by 
Doctor Cyrenius Chapin for a deed of a lot in the village of Buffalo, and 
he having selected lot 42 on which to build the church, a conveyance 
of the lot virould be made to the vestry whenever the agent should be 
assured or satisfied that the building would be erected. This is the 
lot now owned by the parish, and is bounded by Main, Erie,' Church 
and Pearl streets. The corner stone of St. Paul's Church was laid by 
Doctor Cyrenius Chapin, with Masonic ceremonies, June 24, 1819. 

The Rev. Mr. Clark read the church service. The silver plate 
placed in the corner stone in 1819 was found in perfect preservation 
when the foundation of the new church edifice was laid in 1850. 

November 23, 1819, the vestry appointed Oliver Forward to draft 
a letter to Paul Busti of Philadelphia, the general agent of the Holland 
Land Company, to be sent by the Rev. Mr. Clark, soliciting of him 
pecuniary assistance for building the church. At the same meeting it 
was resolved that the committee proceed to enclose the building and lay 
the floor, and that the windows and the tower be of the Gothic order. 

In 1818 Joseph Ellicott, as agent of the Holland Land Company, 
donated to St. Paul's Church $500, of which $300 was in the notes of 
the suspended Niagara Bank of Buffalo, which afterwards became 
entirely insolvent. The village newspaper mentioned the donation as 
unworthy of the company, and made uncalled-for insinuations relative 
thereto, but omitted to state that $200 was also donated in good money, 
and also a valuable lot on which to build the church. Mr. Busti and Mr. 
Ellicott naturally thought that members of the vestry had given the 
partial information to the editor, and both were indignant at the mis- 
representations in the newspaper article. In February, 1820, the Rev. 
Mr. Clark presented Mr. Forward's letter to Mr. Busti in Philadelphia, 
but was met by an angry reference to the newspaper article. Mr. 



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REDUCED FACSIMILE OF AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM JOSEPH ELLICOTT 
To the Vestry, May 20, 1819, in regard to St. Paul's lot. tSee pages 14, 174.) 



History of St. Paul's Church. 15 

Clark assured him that the vestry had nothing to do with the pub- 
lication, and disavowed the aspersions therein. Doctor Cyrenius 
Chapin, the senior warden, wrote to Mr. Ellicott under date June 16, 
1820, also disavowing the offensive article. The happy result of these 
explanations was that the Holland Land Company made an addi- 
tional donation of $200. The $300 Niagara Bank money sold for 
f[i6. As small as these sums may appear to us, they were very 
acceptable to the then vestry. 

They found it difficult to get sufficient money to so far complete the 
church as to occupy it for public worship, and on the 8th of April, 
1820, they passed a resolution appointing Cyrenius Chapin, Josiah 
Trowbridge, and H. M. Campbell a committee to secure proposals from 
the Presbyterian Society relative to furnishing means for finishing St. 
Paul's Church. 

At the annual election of wardens and vestrymen, held at the 
district school-house on Niagara near Pearl Street, May 19, i8ig, 
Doctor Cyrenius Chapin and Henry M. Campbell were elected wardens, 
and Josiah Trowbridge, Elias Ransom, John G. Camp, Oliver Forward, 
Jonas Harrison, Sheldon Thompson, William J. Caldwell, and Smith 
H. Salisbury were elected vestrymen. Frederick B. Merrill was 
appointed clerk of the vestry. 

1820. 

At the annual election, held at the house of John G. Camp, April 
3, 1820, Doctor Cyrenius Chapin and Henry M. Campbell were elected 
wardens, and Elias Ransom, Oliver Forward, Sheldon Thompson, 
Smith H. Salisbury, John G. Camp, Josiah Trowbridge, George Weed, 
and Henry Kip were elected vestrymen. Roswell Chapin was appointed 
clerk of the vestry. 

In the early days of the parish of St. Paul's the choir was composed 
of Jacob A. Barker, Doctor Josiah Trowbridge, and Stephen G. Austin, 
with a few of the ladies of the congregation. 



1 6 History of St. Paul's Church. 

As before stated, the first church service was held in the house of Elias 
Ransom on the northwest corner of Main and Huron streets, and after- 
wards in the Eagle tavern on the west side of Main Street, south of Court 
Street, and after that in the district school-house on Niagara Street near 
Main. The Rev. William A. Clark officiated in the district school-house, 
and when the church edifice was ready for occupancy, in 1820, he was the 
first to officiate in it. It was a frame building forty-four feet wide by sixty 
feet in depth, and the tower was twenty-five feet high from the square. 
It cost $5,000, and the front of the edifice was parallel with Main Street, 
and distant about seventy-five feet from the western line thereof.* 

When it was ready for occupancy, the debt on it was $3,500. The 
Rev. Mr. Clark was indefatigable in his exertions to get this debt re- 
moved. He visited Batavia, N. Y., and received $25 from David E. 
Evans, and in Canandaigua he obtained $25 from John Gregg, the land 
agent, and $25 from John C. Spencer, then one of the rising lawyers of 
Ontario County, and also a contribution from Gideon Granger. He also 
received considerable sums in Albany and in New York, in all about $890, 
out of which was deducted $150 for his traveling expenses to and from 
Philadelphia ; and, as before stated, $200 were also received from Paul 
Busti, the general agent of the Holland Land Company. These subscrip- 
tions, with temporary loans from George and Thaddeus Weed for $150, 
Aaron James $300, and George Keese for $150, enabled the vestry to pay 
up the most pressing demands ; but it was not until 1826 that these loans 
were repaid. 

April 23, 182 1, Judge Oliver Forward was appointed treasurer of the 
parish by the vestry. Although the term " treasurer " occurs in earlier 
records, this is the first mention of a formal appointment to that office. 

The first sale of pews in the frame edifice took place on Novem- 
ber 24, 1820 ; and it being the first building for religious worship 
erected in the village, it was thought that Presbyterians and others 
would purchase pews, provided they were not taxed for the support 
of the parish, and accordingly the vestry decided not to tax them, 
but to rely on the subscriptions of the congregation to pay the rector 

*The curve known as "ElUcott's Bow-window," brought Main Street much nearer 
to the church, at this time. The edifice stood about seventy-five feet west of the curved 
roadway, and about fifty feet inside of the lot line or west boundary of Willink Avenue 
(Main Street, south of Church Street). See map opposite; also pages 219 to 221, 
and plan of lot opposite page 254. 



(Note, page i6, twenty-ninth line from top.) 
St. Paul's was the first church edifice of a permanent character erected in the 
Village of Buffal'o. The little frame meeting-house which was built in a few weeks' 
time by the Methodist Episcopal Society, on leased land on the west side of Pearl 
Street, south of Niagara Street, is said to have been finished January 24, 1819, but 
the building and site were only temporarily occupied by them. 



MAP 

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CHIP PEW AY 



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in 


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ibS 


161 


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99 


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129 


129 


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MAP OF BUFFALO VILLAGE. 

Compiled from Joseph Ellicott's survey of New Amsterdam in 1804 for the Holland Land Company, 

and from S. Ball's plan of Buffalo in 1825. (See pages 16, 19, 174, 220, 254.) 



Plate used bv courtesv of " The Buffalo F,Tnr^«!« " 



History of St. Paul's Church. 17 

and other expenses. This non-taxation soon proved to be an ill-advised 
measure, and continued to be so for many succeeding years. 

The edifice* standing parallel with Main Street, and the front 
entrance being about 75 feet from the west line thereof, the vestry 
placed the chancel at the west end, and pews i and 3 were on the north 
side of the chancel, and pews 2 and 4 were on the south side thereof. 
The two aisles were on each side of the center of the church, and 
extended from the vestibule to the chancel. Pews i, 3, 5, 7, 9, 1 1, 13 and 
15 were on the north side of the north aisle, and pews 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 
27, 29, 31, 33, 35, 37 and 39 were on the south side of the north aisle, and 
pews 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 were on the south side of the south 
aisle, and pews 16, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38 and 40 were on 
the north side of the south aisle. Pews 17 and 18 were immediately 
in front of the chancel. There were 40 pews in all, capable of seating 
between two and three hundred persons. The first sales were to Hor- 
ace Cunningham, who occupied No. 2 ; Henry M. Campbell, No. 4 ; 
Doctor Cyrenius Chapin, No. 6 ; Sylvester Matthews, No. 8 ; Jesse 
D. Hoyt, No. 10 ; W. Stacy, No. 16 ; Mr. Merrill, No. 18 ; Mr. Guiteau, 
No. 20 ; John G. Camp, No. 22 ; Roswell Chapin, No. 24 ; David M. 
Day, No 26 ; M. Marvin, No. 17 ; Doctor Trowbridge, No. 19 ; Aaron 
James, No. 21 ; Mr. Guild, No. 23 ; Mr. Stone, No. 27 ; Henry Kip, 
No. I ; Elias Ransom, No. 3 ; Oliver Forward, No. 5 ; Mr. Salisbury, 
No. 7 ; Ebenezer Walden, No. 9 ; James Sweeney, No. 39 ; (James 
Sweeney, who was in the Vestry for several years subsequent to 1866, 
is the son of the James Sweeney here mentioned.) 

The first sales amounted to $2,951. The lowest sale was for $51, 
and the highest, $184. 

In these early days the mouth of Buffalo Creek was mostly 
obstructed by a sand bar, and the shipping in Lake Erie was from Black 
Rock. Goods for Buffalo came from New York to Albany, thence 
along the Mohawk, thence to Oswego, and by Lake Ontario to Lewis- 

* See reproduction of drawing of the old church, and floor plan of same in this 
volume. 



1 8 History of St. Paul's Church. 

ton, N. Y., and thence by land carriage to Schlosser just above the 
Falls of Niagara, thence by boat along the Niagara River to Black 
Rock, and thence by land along the present Niagara Street to the vil- 
lage of Buffalo. This continued to be the route until the opening of 
the Erie Canal in October, 1825. The business of Buffalo was there- 
fore much circumscribed previous to 1825, and the resources of the 
congregation by no means enabled them to sufficiently support a min- 
ister, or to fully complete the church edifice. In July, 1818, the 
expenses of the parish, including the support of Rev. William A. Clark, 
the rector, were paid by subscription, as follows : Jonas Harrison, $50 ; 
John G. Camp, $50 ; Josiah Trowbridge, $30 ; William J. Caldwell, 
$50 ; Isaac Q. Leake, $30 ; Elias Ransom, $30 ; Frederick B. Merrill, 
$30 ; George Badger, f 10 ; Robert Gilmore, $10 ; John Bigdon, $3 ; 
G. and T. Weed, fio ; J. W. Moulton, $10 ; Staley N. Clark, $15 ; 
John A. Coffin, $15 ; James Sheldon, $5. In all $348, to which was 
added the missionary stipend of $175, making the sum of $523. 

In 1819 only $287 was subscribed in addition to the stipend. Among 
the new subscribers this year were Dr. Cyrenius Chapin, $40 ; Sylvester 
Marvin, $10; J. Cunningham, $5 ; Smith H. Salisbury, $20 ; H.A.Salis- 
bury, $5 ; Henry Kip, |io ; John Root, $12 ; Moses Baker, $5. 

On the 7th of April, 1820, the Rev. Mr. Clark resigned his rector- 
ship. He said in his letter to the vestry that, attached as he was to 
the members of the congregation for their many kind attentions to 
himself and family, nothing but a conviction that he would become 
burdensome to them, beyond their pecuniary ability, would have com- 
pelled his resignation. He thought that this assurance would prevent 
those feelings which are apt to be excited between a clergyman and 
his parishioners whenever their connection is dissolved. That the 
extravagance of high rent and the high price of every necessary of life 
since he had been in Buffalo had exhausted all his private funds. The 
vestry accepted the resignation, and resolved to pay Mr. Clark his 
salary in full, and adjourned to meet at "early candle lighting" at the 
Niagara Bank on April 22d. They then resolved that a committee con- 



History of St. Paul's Church. 19 

sisting of Dr. Cyrenius Chapin and Dr. Josiah Trowbridge be appointed 
to wait on tlie Rev. Deodatus Babcock, and confer with him on the sub- 
ject of his becoming the rector of St. Paul's Church, and to offer him 
the salary of $300, and that Smith H. Salisbury be a committee to cir- 
culate a subscription for the purpose of raising the amount. 

The Rev. Mr. Babcock subsequently signified his acceptance of 
the charge of the parish, as rector. He was married on the t4th of 
May, 1 82 1, to Miss Mary Hine of Cairo, Greene County, N. Y., and 
resided in a frame house on the westerly side of Erie Street, between 
Pearl and Swan Streets. The Rev. William A. Clark became the 
rector of Christ Church, Ballston Springs, Saratoga County, N. Y., and 
in 1825 he was rector of All Saints' Church in New York. 

On the 2d of June, 1820, the wardens and vestrymen addressed 
a communication to Joseph Ellicott, agent of the Holland Land Com- 
pany in Batavia, N. Y., stating that they had complied with his condi- 
tions to erect the church edifice on the lot the company proposed to 
deed to them, and requested him to convey them the lot in fee simple. 
He accordingly deeded them lot number 42 in the village of Buffalo. 
Although the Holland Land Company was so called, yet the title of 
the land was held individually by the proprietors, and a fairer or more 
liberal land company never existed. Their deed to St. Paul's Church 
is recorded in Niagara, now Erie, County Clerk's office in Liber 6 of 
Deeds at page 247, and dated June 14, 1820. 

It recites that " Wilhem Willink, Hendrik VoUenhoven, Rutger 
Jan Schimmelpenninck, Wilhem Willink the younger, Jan Willink, the 
younger son of Jan, Jan Gabriel Van Staphorst, Cornells VoUenhoven 
and Hendrik Seye, all of the City of Amsterdam, in the Kingdom of 
the United Netherlands, by Joseph Ellicott their attorney, of the first 
part, convey to the Wardens and Vestrymen of St. Paul's Church in 
the village of Buffalo, in the County of Niagara and State of New 
York, of the second part, lot 42." A diagram of the lot is drawn on 
the deed, and the bounds are given as fronting on Standiska Avenue, 
now Church Street ; South Cayuga Street, now Pearl Street ; Vollen- 



20 History of St. Paul's Church. 

hoven's Avenue, now Erie Street, and the front is given as Willink 
Avenue, now Main Street. On this commanding yet retired lot now 
stands the beautiful church edifice of St. Paul's, consecrated in 1851, 
and on a part of it stood the frame edifice, consecrated in 1821. 



182I. 

February 20, 182 1, the vestry purchased from Jeremiah Staats, a 
Communion table for $20, and three stools for $7.50. 

The church edifice was consecrated February 25, 1821, by Bishop 
Hobart. 

He signed the instrument of consecration in the following words : 
" Whereas the Wardens and Vestrymen of St. Paul's Church in the 
village of Buffalo, County of Niagara and State of New York, by an 
instrument to me presented, did appropriate a building erected in the 
village of Buffalo, County of Niagara and State of New York, to the 
worship of Almighty God, according to the Liturgy, Rites and Ordi- 
nances of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of 
America, and did request me to set apart and consecrate it accord- 
ingly. Be it therefore known that I, John Henry Hobart, Bishop of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Staite of New York, have on this 
2Sth day of February, in the year of our Lord, 1821, being Sexagesima 
Sunday, consecrated a Building in the village of Buffalo, County of 
Niagara and State of New York, by the name of St. Paul's Church, 
and with the prescribed rites and solemnities have separated it hence- 
forth from all unhallowed, worldly and common uses, and dedicated it 
to the service of Almighty God, for reading His Holy word, for cele- 
brating His Holy Sacraments, for offering to His glorious Majesty the 
sacrifices of prayer and thanksgiving, for blessing the people in His 
name and for the performance of all holy offices, according to the 
Liturgy and Rites of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United 
States of America. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 21 

" In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 
day and year above written, and in the tenth year of my consecration." 

The instrument of consecration is signed " John Henry Hobart," 
and is sealed with a seal having his initials engraved thereon. During 
his visitation Bishop Hobart confirmed twenty persons in St. Paul's 
Church. 

At the annual election of wardens and vestrymen, held in the 
church edifice on April 23, 1821, the Rev. Deodatus Babcock presided, 
Henry M. Campbell and Henry Kip were elected wardens, and Smith 
H. Salisbury, Oliver Forward, EHas Ransom, Sheldon Thompson, 
George Weed, Aaron James, Absalom Bull and Horace Cunningham 
were elected vestrymen. Roswell Chapin was appointed clerk of the 
vestry and Oliver Forward, treasurer. 

At a meeting of the vestry, April 23, 1821, it was "resolved that the 
church adopt as its common seal a marble eight-sided cone, whereon 
is engraved the letters 'St. Paul's Church, Buffalo.'" 

The fourth of July, 1821, was celebrated in the village of Buffalo 
by a procession which marched to St. Paul's Church, and was there 
" joined by a concourse of ladies and gentlemen." The Rev. Deodatus 
Babcock officiated in the performance of the services, the Declaration 
of Independence was read, and appropriate remarks were made by 
Charles Townsend. The village newspaper, the " Buffalo Patriot " of 
July 10, 182 1, says : " The company then repaired to a bower erected 
on the banks of the Lake and Creek and took tea at a party given by 
the ladies, by whose exertions in display of taste and elegance the scene 
was rendered peculiarly interesting, and the time was spent with much 
pleasure and cheerfulness." 

At this time St. Paul's Church was the only public building of any 
note in the village. In the summer of 1821 the bell purchased of 
Horatio Hark was placed in the tower, but was not fully paid for until 
1825. August 22, 1821, Bishop Hobart visited St. Paul's Church and 
admitted the Rev. Deodatus Babcock to the Holy Order of Priests, 
and confirmed four persons. 



22 History of St. Paul's Church. 

1822. 

In 1822, Bishop Hobart sent the Rev. David Brown as a missionary 
to Chautauqua County, N. Y.; he established parishes in Fredonia, 
Westfield and Mayville in that county. 

At the annual election on the 8th of April, 1822, Henry M. 
Campbell and Henry Kip were elected wardens, and Elias Ransom, 
Oliver Forward, Joseph D. Hoyt, Smith H. Salisbury, Sheldon Thomp- 
son, Horace Cunningham, George Weed and Henry Hamilton, vestry- 
men. At a subsequent meeting of the vestry Roswell Chapin, then 
clerk, was directed to call on the Rev. Mr. Babcock, and inform him 
of the amount of the subscription for his support for the ensuing 
year. On the 24th of May, 1822, Mr. Babcock addressed a letter to the 
vestry stating that the amount fell considerably short of what it was the 
preceding year, and as he was willing to make sacrifice for the good of 
the church in Buffalo, he made the proposition that he be paid fifty- 
five dollars at the end of every quarter, and fire-wood for his family 
use, and on these terms he would continue with the parish for six 
months ; and if at the end of that time he found his income equal to 
his expenses he would continue to the end of the year for the same 
quarterly fund. 

The vestry accepted his proposition. In addition he had the mis- 
sionary stipend of $175. This stipend was of very great assistance in 
the early days of the parish. 

1823. 

It was customary for the Holland Land Company to donate one 
hundred acres of land to the first religious society in any of the county 
towns that built an edifice for worship, and it was usually called the 
" Gospel Lot," and was meant for the support of the minister ; accord- 
ingly, on the 7th of March, 1823, the vestry resolved to apply to 



History of St. Paul's Church. 23 

Jacob S. Otto, the then local agent of the company in Batavia, 
N. Y., for a conveyance of one hundred acres in the town of Buffalo, 
St. Paul's Church being entitled to it, according to the rules and regu- 
lations of the company. Mr. Otto had succeeded to the agency in 1821, 
on the resignation of Joseph Ellicott. On the 21st of April, 1823, 
Mr. Otto replied that it was not probable that any further assistance 
would be given to the church in Buffalo. 

March 31, 1823, at the annual election of wardens and vestrymen, 
the Rev. Deodatus Babcock presiding, Henry M. Campbell and George 
B. Webster were elected wardens, and Joseph D. Hoyt, Elias Ransom, 
Smith H. Salisbury, Thomas B. Clarke, Sheldon Ball, Lester Brace, 
Jacob A. Barker and John G. Camp, vestrymen. Roswell Chapin was 
chosen clerk of the vestry. 

May s, 1823, the pews in the new Presbyterian Church (the old 
First) were sold at auction. 

The first contribution from St. Paul's Church, as reported to the 
convention, was $4.50 to the Diocesan fund in 1823. 

October, 1823, St. Paul's Church was represented in the Diocesan 
Convention in the city of New York, by the Rev. Deodatus Babcock. 

1824. 

March 2, 1824, the Rev. Mr. Babcock having expressed to the ves- 
try that at the expiration of his engagement he intended to resign his 
office as rector, it was resolved that while the vestry lamented the 
necessity which would deprive them of his services, they felt it to be 
their duty to adopt measures to secure the regular stated services of 
the church. They accordingly appointed a committee to correspond 
with the standing Committee of the Diocese of New York, on the sub- 
ject of supplying a continuance of those services. 

The Rev. Deodatus Babcock afterwards became the missionary 
rector at Ballston Springs and Saratoga Springs, Saratoga, N. Y., and 



24 History of St. Paul's Church. 

remained at Ballston Springs for many years. He revisited Buffalo in 
October, 1851, after an absence of twenty-seven years, and was present 
and assisted in the consecration of the new edifice of St. Paul's in that 
month. After the services he remained and viewed the marked con- 
trast between 1821 and 1851, for he was at the consecration of the old 
edifice in 182 1, as the then rector. Out of the large congregation in 
1851 there were none of the clergy, except himself, who were present 
in 182 1, and not more than ten of his former parishioners, which few 
greeted him with warm affection. 

April 19, 1824, at the annual election for wardens' and vestrymen, 
George B. Webster and Henry M. Campbell were elected wardens, and 
Elias Ransom, John B. Camp, Joseph D. Hoyt, Smith H. Salisbury, 
Sheldon Ball, Jacob A. Barker, Josiah Trowbridge and Manly Colton, 
vestrymen. 

The earliest records of the Sunday School of the Parish date from 
18 1 8 to 1848, and show that some of the children of the original 
parishioners, as well as the children of the residents of the village, were 
taught by the rector. The school continued to increase until 1824 ; it 
then had twenty scholars, became a more permanent institution, 
and continued to be instrumental in the future growth of the parish. 

July 2, 1824, the vestry resolved that after taking into consideration 
the reduced state as to members in Buffalo, it was inexpedient to make 
any further provisions for the regular supply of the church services. 

According to the village newspaper, the Fourth of July, 1824, was 
celebrated by forming a procession at Rathbun's Eagle tavern, and 
marching to St. Paul's Church, where the Declaration of Independence 
was read by Charles Townsend, and an appropriate and eloquent 
address was delivered by the Rev. Mr. Crawford to a very numerous 
and attentive audience ; the singing was performed in a creditable 
style by the choir, and was highly gratifying to all. There was no 
rector of St. Paul's at that date, and the Rev. Mr. Crawford was the 
Presbyterian minister. 

Grace Church at Black Rock was organized August 10, 1824. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 25 

August 28, 1824, the vestry authorized the calling of the Rev. J. L. 
Yeonnet (pronounced Evaret) of Troy, N. Y., to the rectorship. He 
accepted the call, and was on his way to Buffalo, to take charge of the 
parish, but died at Skaneateles, Onondaga County, N. Y., on the 2rst 
of September, 1824. He was twenty-two years of age and was said to 
have been a young man of excellent education and fine abilities. 



1825. 

March i, 1825, the vestry entertaining a high opinion of the piety, 
talents and exemplary manner of the Rev. Addison Searle, and believ- 
ing that it would greatly advance the interests of the church if he could 
be prevailed upon to become its rector, resolved unanimously that they 
promise to pay him $525 per annum, and if the subscription exceeded 
that amount it should be added to that sum, and the wardens were 
instructed to request his acceptance of the rectorship. 

At the same time a subscription was commenced for the purpose of 
purchasing an organ for the church, and the following sums were sub- 
scribed : Sheldon Ball, $20 ; George B. Webster, $25 ; Jesse D. Hoyt, 
$25 ; Josiah Trowbridge, $20 ; Roswell Chapin, $20 ; Henry M. 
Campbell, $20 ; Elias Ransom, $20 ; M. Case and son, $7.50 ; G. and 
T. Weed, $20 ; John g-. Camp, $20 ; G. H. Goodrich, $5 ; John^oot, 
$ro ; Benjamin Rathbun, $10 ; Alanson Palmer, $20 ; Henry Hamil- 
ton, fio ; Smith H. Salisbury, fs ; Joseph Clary, $2 ; R. Hargrave 
Lee, $5 ; S. G. Austin, $3 ; M. M. Dox, $5 ; cash in fifteen different 
items, $77, being a total subscription of $349.50. 

The Rev. Mr. Searle addressed a letter to the wardens on the 30th 
of March, 1825, accepting the rectorship ; he at once entered upon its 
duties, and at a meeting of the vestry, on the same day, he was 
authorized and given discretionary power to contract with any person 
or persons for the construction, transportation and putting up of an 
organ in the church. 



26 History of St. Paul's Church. 

When the Rev. Mr. Searle took charge of St. Paul's parish he was 
thirty-five years of age. 

The vestry of Grace Church at Black Rock having proposed to 
avail themselves of a portion of the services of the Rev. Mr. Searle, 
the vestry of St. Paul's agreed thereto, on condition that they pay $125 
per annum for the same, for one fourth of the time. Grace Church at 
Black Rock had no church edifice, the congregation meeting in the 
school-house. 

April 4, 1825, at the annual election of wardens and vestrymen, the 
Rev. Addison Searle presiding, Henry M. Campbell and George B. 
Webster were elected wardens, and Elias Ransom, Josiah Trowbridge, 
Manly Colton, Joseph D. Hoyt, Guy H. Goodrich, Jacob A. Barker, 
Sheldon Ball and John G. Camp vestrymen, Roswell Chapin was 
chosen clerk, and George B. Webster treasurer, and on July 25, 1825, 
Loring Pierce was appointed sexton during the pleasure of the vestry. 

The only baptism by immersion in the parish was performed by 
the Rev. Mr. Searle, and is thus recorded by him : " Sarah, wife of 
Lawson Hoyt, born in Temple, New Hampshire, November 18, 1789, 
was baptized on the shore of Lake Erie, by immersion, on the sixth 
Sunday after Trinity, July 10, 1825. Witnesses, Hon. Henry M. 
Campbell and Mrs. Elizabeth Camp." 

August 13, 1825, William James, having removed to Albany, N. Y., 
presented his pews, Nos. 16 and 21, to the church, and the vestry 
returned their thanks to him therefor. 

August 22, 1825, the organ recently placed in the church by Hall & 
Erben was accepted, and the treasurer was instructed to pay them $430. 
On August 27, 1825, the vestry for the first time appointed three dele- 
gates to represent the parish in the Diocese of New York, to meet in 
the city of New York in October, 1825. Henry Kip, David D. Aiken 
and Jacob A. Barker were appointed. 

In 1825 St. Paul's contributed $5 to the Episcopal fund, $5 to the 
Missionary fund, and $4.25 to the Diocesan fund. The number of 
communicants reported to the convention was twenty-seven. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 27 

According to the village newspaper, Mr. Searle held the church 
service in St. Paul's early in September, 1825, reading the morning 
prayers and appropriate Psalms, at the request of Major Mordecai M. 
Noah of the city of New York, to enable him to perform the ceremony 
of laying the corner-stone of his proposed City of Ararat on Grand 
Island, by laying it in St. Paul's Church instead of on the Island. 
The church choir sang on the occasion, the Ante-Communion service 
was said, and Major Noah pronounced a discourse announcing the re- 
organization of the Jewish government. The whole enterprise came 
to naught very soon afterwards.* 

October 26, 1825, the great Erie Canal, "the golden stream" as it 
has been called, was opened from Buffalo to Albany. This event was the 
advent of that sure prosperity which increased gradually with increas- 
ing years, not only for Buffalo but for all Western New York, and not 
only for Western New York but for the whole State, and for the great ■ 
West beyond Buffalo. This prosperity for Buffalo furnished in after 
years the means for the temporal well-being of the parish of St. Paul's. 

December 23, 1825, Cochran & Fisher of Batavia, N. Y., contracted 
to re-cast the church bell for a heavier one. 



1826. 

January 20, 1826, the vestry, notwithstanding the refusal of the 
Holland Land agent in 1823, appointed the Rev. Addison Searle and 
Jacob A. Barker a committee to procure from the company a " Glebe 
lot " for the parish. 

March 3, 1826, the vestry appointed the Rev. Mr. Searle and Dr. 
Josiah Trowbridge a committee to procure a donation from Trinity 
Church in the city of New York. All efforts were unavailing to get 
any pecuniary assistance from Trinity Church, but subsequently, when 
St. Paul's Chapel in New York was fitted up, the Rev. Mr. Searle ob- 



* See Note in Appendix. 



28 History of St. Paul's Church. 

tained from Trinity Church the beautiful glass chandelier which orna- 
mented for so many years the frame edifice of St. Paul's, Buffalo, 
until its removal in 1850. 

March 13, 1826, when the Rev. Mr. Searle took charge of St. 
Paul's, the edifice was poorly fitted up, and he procured requisite 
furniture for it which, with other outlays, caused a debt of $800 ; this 
debt the vestry proposed to discharge by deeding unsalable pews free 
of taxation for the support of the parish. 

March 27, 1826, at the annual election of wardens and vestrymen, 
the Rev. Mr. Searle presiding, Henry M. Campbell and George B. 
Webster were elected wardens, and Jacob A. Barker, William Williams, 
Russell H. Heywood, J. J. Ulman, Benjamin Rathbun, Henry Hamil- 
ton, Anthony Beers and Sylvester Matthews, vestrymen, but on June 
13, 1826, Henry M. Campbell having removed to Detroit, Dr. Josiah 
Trowbridge was elected warden in his place. 

The "Buffalo Emporium" of July 29, 1826, announced that the 
deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, which took place on the 
Fourth of July in that year, were commemorated in Buffalo by a pro- 
cession through Pearl Street and the Terrace, and along Main Street 
to St. Paul's Church. During the procession, and before and after the 
services, the church bell tolled, and at the church, which was filled to 
overflowing, the ceremonies were interesting and solemn. The Rev. 
Mr. Searle read the church services and made an impressive prayer, 
and Sheldon Smith pronounced an eulogy on the deceased statesmen. 

At the convention in 1826, St. Paul's Church was represented by 
the Rev. Addison Searle, and by Guy H. Goodrich as a lay delegate. 
Bishop Hobart reported that he had confirmed twenty-six persons in 
September, 1826, in Buffalo. The number of communicants reported 
was thirty-five in Buffalo and ten at Black Rock. The bishop also 
reported that he had visited Chautauqua County, and that the congre- 
gation of St. Paul's Church. Mayville, N. Y., was erecting a church 
edifice. The bishop again visited Mayville, September 3, 1828, and 
consecrated St. Paul's Church in that village. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 29 

The committee, consisting of the Rev. Mr. Searle and Jacob A. 
Barker, appointed in January, 1826, to procure from the Holland Land 
Company a deed of one hundred acres of land, called by the company 
the " Gospel lot," concluded to visit Jacob S. Otto, the agent of the 
company in Batavia, and to make a personal appeal to him for the 
donation. Mr. Otto had previously refused to make such a donation. 
A ride from Buffalo to Batavia over the indifferent roads of 1826 
was a day's journey, but the committee finally made the visit, and such 
was the persuasive ability of Mr. Searle, that Mr. Otto finally consented 
to deed to the rector, wardens and vestrymen one hundred acres, 
about five miles from Buffalo, on the Military Road, which road had 
been laid out between Buffalo and Lewiston, N. Y., by the United 
States Government during the war of 1812. He accordingly deeded 
to them part of lot No. 43 in township 12, and range 8, of the 
Holland Land Company lands, fronting 13 chains and 54 links on 
the Military Road, and running back about 75 chains to the New 
York Reservation line, which is one mile easterly of the Niagara 
River. The conditions of the deed being that it should be held in 
trust for the support of the parish, or the ministers thereof only, to be 
leased in terms of twenty-one years each, and if used otherwise, the 
land should revert to the company. The deed is signed by Wilhem 
Willink, Wilhem Willink the younger, Jan Willink the younger son of 
Jan, and Cornells Vollenhoven, all of the City of Amsterdam, in the 
Kingdom of the United Netherlands, by Jacob S. Otto, their attorney ; 
it is dated January 23, 1827, and is recorded in Erie County Clerk's 
office in Liber 10 of Deeds at page 47. Mr. Otto died May 2, 
1827, and was succeeded in the agency of the company by David 
E. Evans of Batavia, N. Y. On September 4, 1830, Mr. Evans, as 
such agent, executed a quit claim deed of the said one hundred 
acres to the rector, wardens and vestrymen, so that they could have 
full control thereof and hold it in fee simple. This quit claim deed 
is recorded in Erie County Clerk's office in Liber 14 of Deeds, 
page 460. 



30 History of St. Paul's Church. 



1827. 

The First Presbyterian Church, on Main Street, was dedicated 
March 28, 1827. 

April 12, 1827, the pew owners in St. Paul's Church were as follows, 
namely : Pew No. i, Henry Kip ; No. 2, G. and T. Weed ; No. 3, 
Elias Ransom ; No. 4, Benjamin Rathbun ; No. 5, John G. Camp ; No. 
6, Dr. Cyrenius Chapin ; No. 7, Guy H. Goodrich ; No, 8, Matthews 
and Hoyt ; No. 9, E. Walden and William Williams ; No. 10, Jacob A. 
Barker; No. 11, G. and T. Weed; No. 12, John Lay, Jr.; No. 13, 
Henry M. Campbell ; No. 14, George B. Webster ; No. 15, R. H. 
Heywood ; No. 16, Camp, Goodrich and Webster ; No. 17, R. H. Hey- 
wood ; No. 18, F. B. Merrill and John Root ; No. 19, Josiah Trow- 
bridge ; No. 20, Mrs. St. John ; No. 21, Roswell Chapin ; No. 22, 
Albert H. Tracy ; No. 23, Lucius Gould ; No. 24, Manly Colton ; No. 
25, Mrs. Granger ; No. 26, George B. Webster ; No. 27, G. H. Good- 
rich ; No. 28, Mr. Peck ; No. 29, Josiah Trowbridge ; No. 30, Henry 
M. Campbell; No. 31, Cyrus Athearn ; No. 32, George B. Webster; 
No. 33, Erastus Gilbert ; No. 34, Rev. Addison Searle ; No. 35, Jacob 
A. Barker ; No. 36, Zenas W. Barker ; No. 37, Josiah Trowbridge ; 
No. 38, Jacob A. Barker ; No. 39, Gilbert and Sweeney ; No. 40, 
Josiah Trowbridge. 

April 16, 1827, at the annual election of wardens and vestrymen, 
the Rev. Mr. Searle presiding, George B. Webster and Dr. Josiah Trow- 
bridge were elected wardens, and Henry R. Stagg, John G. Camp, 
Jacob A. Barker, William Williams, Russell H. Heywood, Benjamin 
Rathbun, Anthony Beers, and Sylvester Matthews vestrymen, and on 
May 10, Dyre Tillinghast was appointed clerk of the vestry. 

May 10, 1827, Jacob A. Barker was appointed a committee to pre- 
vent all trespasses on the " Glebe lot," and to prosecute all offenders. 
It was very common in those days for persons to cut off valuable tim- 
ber from unoccupied lands. 



In, ISU.At, wilt CKi rf tKt CkuttK wii 




PLAN OF ORIGINAL FRAME CHURCH OF ST. PAUL'S, 
As built in 1819, with names of pew holders in 1827. 

Compiled by G. H. B. from old drawings, 
records, and descriptions. 

The names of purchasers of pews at 
first sale in 1820 will be found on page 17. 
(Sec pages 17-30.) 



E 
H 
Of 
O 



History of St. Paul's Church. 31 

In 1827, the report to the convention was 50 communicants and 
60 Sunday School children, in St. Paul's. 

November 28, 1827, a liberal subscription was made for church 
music. Christmas, 1827, the church was dressed with evergreens. 



1828. 

April 7, 1828, at the annual election of wardens and vestrymen, 
George B. Webster and Dr. Josiah Trowbridge were elected wardens, 
and Jacob A. Barker, Russell H. Heywood, Guy H. Goodrich, John W. 
Beals, John Lay, Jr., Cyrus Athearn, John G. Camp, and William Wil- 
liams vestrymen, and Dyre Tillinghast was appointed the clerk ; and 
on the 15th of April the vestry appointed Guy H. Goodrich, Dr. Josiah 
Trowbridge and John W. Beals a committee to enquire into the pro- 
priety of enlarging the church edifice ; on the iSthof April the commit- 
tee reported in favor of the same, and Messrs. Williams, Webster and 
Goodrich were appointed a committee to ascertain to what extent new 
pews could be sold. 

April 3, 1828, Loring Pierce, the sexton, reported that he had con- 
structed a gravel walk in front of the church at an expense of $5.50, 
and it had been paid for by subscription. At this time sidewalks in the 
village of Buffalo were mostly of gravel. 

May I, 1828, a committee was appointed, called the Building 
Committee, to cause the following additions, alterations and improve- 
ments to be made ; namely, to extend the westerly end of the church 
to Pearl Street, to correspond in style with the then edifice, and to 
remove the chancel, reading-desk and pulpit into the said extension ; also 
to construct twelve single and six double pews in addition to the then 
number and to finish rooms in the basement for the Sunday School ; also 
to raise the tower to a height to correspond with the increased length, 
with balustrade around the whole roof, and with such other alterations, 
repairs and fixtures as to make the whole building correspond with the 



32 History of St. Paul's Church. 

addition, the whole to have three good coats of paint. The whole to 
be done without incurring any debt on the parish, and payment to be 
made by the vestry deeding the additional pews to Dr. Trowbridge or 
to such person as h^ directed. These improvements cost $2,500. 

The Rev. Mr. Searle reported to the convention in October, 1828, 
that St. Paul's Church had been gradually and constantly increasing in 
temporal and spiritual things, and that the enlargement and thorough 
repair of the edifice had made it one of the handsomest churches, out- 
side of the cities, in the State.* 

James D. Sheppard was the church organist in 1826, and for twenty 
years thereafter. 



* The following interesting description of the old church is talcen from " Recol- 
lections of Buffalo, or Fifty Years Since," by Mr. Samuel M. Welch, published by 
him in 1891 : — " The original St. Paul's Church building which stood on the site of 
the present structure, was a frame building of ' Gothic mould,' as nearly as anything 
without special architectural supervision. The steeple, or tower, did not "pierce the 
skies,' was of modest proportions, with four spikes, one at each comer of the top. 
Seemingly copied from the picture of some Norman building. The whole painted in 
shades of sky blue. It was not very grand, but pleasant to look upon ; interesting to 
the rural amateur antiquarian, as well as the lover of simplicity. Finished like the rural 
parish churches of England imitating the grander cathedrals, with high pulpit and 
rector's desk, its background and seats cushioned and curtained in bright red as high 
as its chancel window might have been, had there been one ; beneath the pulpit in its 
foreground, was the curate's or ' dark's ' reading box. With high back pews and 
family square seats along either window or wall side, each with its table to rest their 
books of ' common prayer,' (a misnomer to me, I think they are uncommon prayers), 
and their Bibles and hymnals during service. It had a full gallery all around the three 
sides, an organ, and the bell, whose old familiar ring I hear occasionally coming from 
the low belfry of the modern church, like sounds from home, while the more exalted 
place in the later steeple is given to the chimes. The old church resembled in its 
make up the almost ancient one of Bishop Berkeley, built in the last century in New- 
port, R. I., which is one of the objects of interest in that delightful summer resort and 
naval station. How we boys and girls loved that little old unpretentious church ! And 
when it was moved away off, down Genesee Street, to make way for a more solid and 
grander building, we realized with a sorrowful sigh, that our boyhood days were 
indeed over." 



■q 

w 



71 

n 




History of St. Paul's Church. 33 

Mr. Searle was the rector from March, 1824, to December 31, 1828. 
He was a chaplain in the United States Navy, and had leave of 
absence during his residence in Buffalo. He was much more methodical 
in the records of his office than any of his predecessors, and in record- 
ing the baptisms would give the exact name and the day of birth, and 
in giving the date of the baptism, would also give the day according to 
the church calendar, as St. Peter's Day, Trinity Sunday, St. Mark's Day, 
Ascension Day, or such other day as it was. His records in these re- 
spects are models and useful precedents. Soon after coming to Buffalo 
Mr. Searle boarded with George B. Webster, and afterwards resided 
in a house on the corner of Franklin and Mohawk streets. During 
his residence in this house he was visited by his friend Rev. William 
Shelton, then on his first visit to Niagara Falls. In the summer of 1827 
Mr. Searle invited him to preach in St. Paul's, and he thus preached his 
first sermon in the church of which he afterwards became the rector. 

Mr. Searle's salary from the Missionary fund, as chaplain in the 
navy, and as rector of St. Paul's, enabled him not only to live comfort- 
ably but to contribute something to the needs of the parish. He was 
in Buffalo during the anti-masonic excitement in 1826 and 1827, con- 
sequent on the abduction of William Morgan, and, although he was a 
decided mason, conducted himself with such propriety, as to give no 
offense to the strong anti-masonic element in the community. Mr. 
Searle had good executive ability, was a good churchman, and was 
much appreciated by his congregation. He was unmarried, and his 
sister. Miss Searle, kept house for him. 

September 25, 1828, the Rev. Addison Searle resigned the rectorship 
of St. Paul's Church. 

At a meeting of the vestry of St. Paul's Church on September 26, 
1828, Mr. Tillinghast, as the clerk, was directed to inform Bishop 
Hobart of the resignation of Mr. Searle, and to ask his advice as to 
who should be called to succeed him, and to say that the vestry were 
favorably inclined to extend an invitation to the Rev. William Shelton 
of Fairfield, Connecticut. 



34 History of St. Paul's Church. 

The bishop replied under date of October 6, 1828, that he deeply 
regretted the resignation of Mr. Searle ; that he had full confidence in 
the correct principles and views of the Rev. Mr. Shelton, and that his 
talents, fidelity, zeal and excellent temper and habits would secure 
him the increasing confidence of the congregation and enable him to be 
useful to them, and that it would afford him great pleasure to see him 
settled in Buffalo. The bishop assured the vestry that he was much 
gratified with the evidence they afforded him of the friendly disposi- 
tion to him officially and personally. 

The vestry met October loth, and resolved that the Rev. Mr. Shelton 
be invited to take the pastoral charge of St. Paul's Church, and that the 
salary of $500 per annum be guaranteed to him by the parishioners, 
and as much beyond that sum as could be procured from the congre- 
gation by voluntary subscription, and also whatever sum should be 
received from the Missionary fund of the Diocese. 

Mr. Tillinghast, as clerk of the vestry, addressed a letter to the Rev. 
Mr. Shelton under date of October 11, 1828, extending to him the 
rectorship, and said that the highly satisfactory performance of divine 
service in the summer of 1827, the very flattering manner in which he 
had been spoken of by the Rev. Mr. Searle, the estimation in which he 
was held by the friends of the church, and the exalted opinion entertained 
of him by Bishop Hobart, had induced the vestry to hope that the invi- 
tation would be accepted. Mr. Tillinghast also stated that it was not 
any dissatisfaction that caused the resignation of Mr. Searle, but the 
conviction on his part that his constitution could not endure the 
climate. Mr. Tillinghast stated the terms that the vestry had author- 
ized, and also stated that during Mr. Searle's rectorship the subscrip- 
tions for his salary had gradually increased from $500 to $700 per 
annum and that the missionary stipend was $125 per annum. He 
also stated that the parishioners had been perfectly united during Mr. 
Searle's incumbency. Mr. Tillinghast also stated that since Mr. 
Shelton was in Buffalo in 1827, the church edifice had undergone a 
thorough repair and had received an addition of eighteen feet in 




THE ORIGINAL ALTAR, CHANCEL-RAIL, READING-DESK, AND PULPIT IN 

ST. PAUL'S FRAME CHURCH. 

Retained when the church was enlarged in 1828. (See pages 31, 32, 384.) 

The Marble Font was afterwards used in the stone church until the fire of 1888. (See pages 59, 70, 275.) 



It,! 





w 



K 



4^. 



PLAN OF CHANCEL IN FRAME CHURCH. 



From drawings made for Charles W. 
Evans, by John Hefford, in 1849. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 35 

length, would be completed in about one month, and would then be a 
very elegant church. 

The Rev. Mr. Shelton replied to the invitation on November 11, 
1828, declining the rectorship, and said in his letter that the call had 
given him the privilege of becoming the clergyman of one of the most 
promising congregations perhaps in the whole country, and that it 
offered him the companionship and friendship of an interesting people, 
and put it in his power to become eminently useful in the church of 
Christ, and offered him a compensation ample for all his wants. He 
expressed to the vestry the sense of the obligation he was under for their 
flattering predilections, and that nothing but a firm conviction on his 
mind of duty would have prevailed on him to answer as he had. In 
his letter to the Rev. Mr. Searle, with whom he was on terms of inti- 
mate friendship, written a short time before the one declining the 
invitation, he said that to accept would be taking him from his home, 
his good and aged mother, his family, his hereditary friends, his parish- 
ioners to whom he was bound by strong feelings of attachment, not a 
member of whom had ever had any other clergyman or spiritual coun- 
selor, except his father whose name they venerated, and himself whom 
they regarded with sensations very different from any other. 

The Rev. Mr, Searle remained in the parish until the close of the 
year 1828, and continued his efforts to procure a rector. On Decem- 
ber 1 1, 1828, Bishop Hobart wrote to him that he had been perplexed to 
know what to do abqut Buffalo, but he had at length induced the Rev. 
Reverard Kearney to visit there. That he was a clergyman of respect- 
able talents and attainments, gentlemanly in his manner, and he 
thought would faithfully devote himself to the duties of his office. 

On December 17, 1828, the vestry appointed a committee to collect 
the balance of salary due Mr. Searle. They had previously resolved 
to repay Mr. Searle for the carpeting he had furnished for the aisles of 
the church, out of the communion offerings, and out of the funds col- 
lected by the ladies for said carpeting. At the same meeting they 
appointed Cyrus Athearn, Jacob A. Barker and John Lay, Jr., a 



36 History of St. Paul's Church. 

committee to dress the church with evergreens for Christmas, and to 
superintend the expenditure thereof. This very proper custom was 
continued in after years. 

The services on Christmas day, 1838, and the sermon by the Rev. 
Mr. Searle were mentioned with much approbation by a correspondent 
in the village newspaper, and the enlarged church edifice was referred 
to as being very elegant and convenient for public worship, and not 
excelled by any other country edifice in the State. The editor in the 
same paper remarked that the flourishing state of the parish was 
attributable to the talents and industry of Mr. Searle, and referred to 
the state of his health as requiring him to leave Buffalo, and that he 
would have the good wishes, esteem and affection of those connected 
with him in the church. 

1829. 

Mr. Searle communicated to the vestry that Bishop Hobart had 
selected the Rev. Reverard Kearney to supply the church services, 
and it was resolved that the vestry would receive him, and on January 
17, 1829, it was further resolved that the Rev. Mr. Kearney be invited 
to accept the rectorship at $550 per annum exclusive of the missionary 
stipend, to commence January, 1829. At the same meeting it was 
resolved to pay James D. Sheppard $150 per annum for his services as 
organist. 

The Rev. Mr. Searle re-entered on his duties as Chaplain in the 
Navy Yard at Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1829. He continued for some years 
in the navy, visiting different countries in the Government war ves- 
sels, sometimes writing from different South American ports to his 
friend the Rev. William Shelton in Buffalo. He died in the year 1850 
on board the United States frigate Cumberland on its voyage to 
Alexandria in Egypt. 

April 20, 1829, at the annual election of wardens and vestrymen, 
the Rev. Mr. Kearney presiding, George B. Webster and Dr. Josiah 



History of St. Paul's Church. 37 

Trowbridge were elected wardens, and Russell H. Heywood, William 
Williams, John W. Beals, Jerry Ratcliff, Manly Colton, Henry Hamil- 
ton, Augustine Eaton and Jacob A. Barker, vestrymen. Dyre Tilling- 
hast was appointed clerk of the vestry. 

The parish is very much indebted to Mr. Tillinghast for the very 
proper and methodical manner in which he kept the records and papers 
of the vestry. Without his care and attention they would have 
eventually been lost. From 18 17 to 1827 the minutes of the vestry 
had been kept on loose pieces of paper, and were so kept until Mr. 
Tillinghast procured a suitable church book and copied the;se loose 
records in it. All succeeding clerks of the vestry have followed his 
good example. 

April 28, 1829, at a meeting of the vestry, a communication was 
received from the Rev. Mr. Kearney, wishing to know if his services 
were acceptable to the parish, and the vestry answered that they were. 
On the 1 2th of May he was paid $244 in full of his salary, and soon after 
left the parish, and eventually went to New York. His letters to the 
vestry after his departure showed dissatisfaction on his part. It was 
evident that he was not in sympathy with most of the congregation. 
The letters evinced a determination on his part not to " depart one 
hair's breadth " from the course he had " marked out " for himself, and 
if not acceptable, they could consider his resignation as offered. 

On the 19th of June, 1829, Mr. Kearney, in a letter from New 
York, resigned the rectorship, but before receiving it the vestry, on 
the 20th of June, declared the rectorship vacant, and so addressed 
Mr. Kearney in New York, and passed a resolution inviting the Rev. 
William Shelton to take the parochial charge of the parish, at the 
salary of $600 per annum, exclusive of the missionary stipend, and 
appointed George B. Webster, R. H. Heywood and William Williams 
to communicate the resolution to him. They also appointed Dr. 
Trowbridge a committee to sell the organ and purchase a new one. 
The subscription for the new organ was commenced September 22, 
1829, and amounted to $950. 



38 History of St. Paul's Church. 

June 22, 1829, the committee addressed their communication to the 
Revi Mr. Shelton at Bridgeport, Conn., offering him the rectorship at 
f 600 per annum. He replied by letter dated July 21, 1829, stating 
that he had taken into consideration all things connected with the 
question, that he had weighed all the arguments on either side, with that 
attentive deliberation which they so eminently required of him, and the 
result was that he had resolved to commit himself, under God, to the 
honor and principle of the good people of St. Paul's parish, trusting 
that he might be useful, and believing that he might be rendered 
happy under the circumstances in which Divine Providence had placed 
him. He assured them that he would use his utmost endeavors to be 
with them as early as possible, but thought it would not be earlier than 
the last week in August, as he had a variety of interests to attend to, 
and his duty to his small but much beloved parish in Fairfield, Conn. 

Accordingly, on the 24th of July, 1829, he addressed his letter of 
resignation to the wardens and vestry of Trinity Church, Fairfield, and 
said it was one of the most painful efforts of his life to bring his mind 
to the conclusion to resign his position as the rector. 

He alluded to the long service of years that his father and himself 
had ministered to them — his father whose honored remains reposed 
under their altar. He assured them that neither time nor distance 
would ever take from him the interest he felt for their welfare, and if 
prosperity continued with them, he would rejoice, or if adversity befell 
them, he would as strongly sympathize with them. 

When Mr. Shelton declined the rectorship in 1828, it was the wish 
of his excellent mother that he should do so. She naturally thought 
that he was fulfilling his duty in his then parish, and it was proper for 
him to remain where she was, but when the invitation was repeated in 
1829, she advised him to accept it, for she then thought it was the 
direction of Providence for him to obey the call, and he accordingly 
obeyed it. 

July 30th, George B.. Webster, one of the committee, addressed a 
letter to him at Bridgeport, stating that it had given the whole parish 




"THE CHURCHES" IN 1838. 

From Volume HI. of Buckingham's *' America," published in London, England, in 

the early '40's. (See pages 30, 174.) 




EASTERLY END OF THE INTERIOR OF ST. PAUL'S FRAME CHURCH. 
Showing the organ. (1829-1850.) (See pages 37, 322, 325.) 



From a drawing made in 1849 by John Hefford. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 39 

sincere pleasure for him to accept the rectorship, for while they antici- 
pated his acceptance they feared otherwise. He said that the church 
had been closed since about the middle of May, with only occasional 
services, the present was a season of the year when it was important 
that it should be opened regularly, and that he feared the congregation 
would be a little scattered. They had every reason to deplore the recent 
change of pastors ; Mr. Searle had left the church in a most enviable 
state of harmony, and indeed there had never been an instance of want 
of it since the organization of the parish ; the congregation was well 
instructed in the doctrines of the church, and in the correct and regu- 
lar performance of the services, at least correct according to their 
understanding and, as they believed, in conformity with the practice of 
Bishop Hobart. Mr. Searle's successor, Mr. Kearney, without any 
reference to established use or to the feelings of the congregation, 
introduced novelties into it, and marked out a course of conduct and 
policy, which, while it seemed to make him popular with a part of the 
people who made no pretensions to being churchmen, lost him the 
confidence of those upon whom the church always had depended, 
and notwithstanding when he left there was some small degree 
of feeling manifested, yet soon there was only one sentiment on the 
subject. Mr. Webster said further that at the time of his writing he 
believed there existed no hindrance to an entire harmony and concord 
in the parish and that he had no doubt that a straightforward, unde- 
viating and churchman-like course would speedily restore whatever the 
parish might have suffered by a change of pastor. 

Mr. Webster also stated in his letter that a pastor, who should 
possess the confidence and affection of the people, might look for 
much happiness in Buffalo, that frequent changes in the rectorship of 
a parish were always to be deplored, and that there was nothing which 
a people more earnestly desired than a faithful pastor who would be 
content to remain permanently and grow up with the parish as their 
spiritual head and counselor. Mr. Webster further said that the 
immediate maintenance which the parish could furnish was less than 



40 History of St. Paul's Church. 

a man qualified to fill the station had a right to demand, but it was to be 
expected that it would annually increase until it became a competence. 

It is very remarkable that Mr. Webster, in stating the proper qualifica- 
tions of a rector, as one who should be " straightforward, undeviating and 
churchman-like, who should possess the confidence and affection of the 
people, and remain permanently with them, growing up with the parish as 
their spiritual head and counselor," should not only have described Mr. 
Shelton the then rector, as he was at the time, but, without being aware 
of it, should also have marked out the course of his rectorship for more 
than fifty succeeding years. Mr. Webster's expectation that there would 
be an annual increase of the salary until it became a conipetence, was 
not fulfilled to the extent it should have been. 

The new rector was born in Fairfield, Connecticut, Septembeir ii, 
1798, and was the seventh of the nine sons and daughters of Philo and 
Lucy Nichols Shelton. The Rev. Philo Shelton was born in Huntington, 
Conn., in 1755, graduated at VTale College in 1775, was ordained deacon* 
and then priest by Bishop Seabury in 1785, and was forty years rector of 
St. John's Church, Bridgeport, and Trinity Church, Fairfield. He died 
February 27, 1825, aged seventy. His wife was born in 1761, and died 
in 1838, aged seventy-seven. Philo Shelton no doubt impressed his own 
character on his son William. In a letter written in 1857 to the Rev. Dr. 
William B. Sprague, the author of the "Annals of the American Episcopal 
Pulpit," the son said of the father, that " he was distinguished for simplic- 
ity, integrity and an honest and earnest devotion to the interests of pure 
and undefiled religion, and was both by education and conviction a 
thorough Episcopalian, and his theology was strictly in accordance with 

* It is said that Philo Shelton was the first deacon ordained in the United States. 
Bishop Seabury was consecrated the iirst Bishop of the American Church, in Aber- 
deen, Scotland, November 14, 1784, immediately after which he returned to America, 
arriving in June, 1785. He held his first ordination — the first Episcopal ordination 
in America — in Christ Church, Middletown, Conn., on August 3, 1785 ; four candi- 
dates were ordained to the diaconate, one of whom was Philo Shelton. (See Sprague's 
" Annals of the American Episcopal Pulpit," Vol. 5, pages 151 and 350 ; also Bishop 
Perry's "History of the American Episcopal Church," Vol. 2, page 450.) 




THE REVEREND WILLIAM SHELTON. 

At about the age of thirty-live. 



From the painting; formerly owned 
by him, ascribed to Walker, and now 
in the Parish House. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 41 

the Book of Common Prayer. He believed in the divinely constituted 
church, and believed the Church in America to be a daughter of the 
Church in England, and believed in the unshaken succession of that 
Church through her bishops from the Apostles' days, believed in the 
spiritual efficacy of the sacraments, and in the divinity of Christ, by whose 
sacrifice the sins of men were atoned for. These and other kindred doc- 
trines he taught as essential to the well-being of the Christian religion." 
Those were essentially the doctrines of the new rector of St. Paul's, 
believed in and practiced by him during all the period of his rectorship. 

In his younger days the son, William, was liberally educated with 
special reference to the ministry, and in 1823, graduated at the General 
Theological Seminary, and in the same year was ordained deacon by 
Bishop Brownell of Connecticut, and priest by the same, in 1825, in 
Fairfield, in that State. 

Soon after his ordination, in 1823, he took charge of the missionary 
station at Plattsburg, on Lake Champlain, N. Y., and subsequently, in 
1824, was the minister of St. Paul's Church, Fairfield, Conn., and con- 
tinued there until his removal to Buffalo in 1829. 

He entered on his duties, and preached his first sermon as rector 
of St. Paul's Church in Buffalo, N. Y., on Sunday, September 13, 1829. 
He was then thirty-one years of age.* 

* The following description of the old frame church was given by Dr. Shelton in 
an address made to the parishioners, at the rectory on Pearl Street, on the occasion of 
his birthday and the forty-eighth anniversary of his rectorship of St. Paul's, September 
11,1877. Speaking of his coming to Buffalo, he said : .... " The church had 
been organized a number of years, and the church building had been occupied perhaps 
ten years. It stood on the site where now St. Paul's stands. That building was a 
neat and plain, but very respectable one, and we all had an honest pride in it, and 
were generally satisfied with it. It stood facing Main Street. The chancel was in 
the west end. The pews on the sides of the church were square and there was no 
gallery. In time the square pews were changed into slips, and then as the congrega- 
tion enlarged, as it did rapidly, there was a demand for a gallery, which was in due 
time erected and filled. Then the Sunday-school room was enlarged and was soon full 

of children and their teachers The congregation was composed of persons 

from various parts of the nation, principally from New England." .... 



42 History of St. Paul's Church. 

His salary as established in 1829 was from the parish, $600 ; from 
Grace Church, Black Rock, $75 ; missionary stipend, $125 ; in all, $800. 

When the Rev. William Shelton came to Buffalo, in 1829, he was 
not acquainted with anyone excepting Carlisle T. Allen, whom he had 
known in Plattsburg, N. Y. Carlisle T. Allen and George W. Allen 
were brothers, and they, with their respective families, were efficient 
members of St. Paul's. Carlisle T. Allen is still connected with the 
parish, and is the father-in-law of Howard H. Baker, one of the vestry 
of 187 1 and several subsequent years.* 

1830. 

At the annual election of wardens and vestrymen, April 12, 1830, 
Rev. William Shelton presiding, George B. Webster and Russell H. 
Heywood were elected wardens, and Sheldon Thompson, Pierre A. 
Barker, Henry Hamilton, Jerry Ratcliff, John R. Carpenter, Cyrus 
Athearn, Zenas W. Barker and Dyre Tillinghast, vestrymen ; and at a 
subsequent meeting Martin Chittenden was appointed clerk, and 
George B. Webster treasurer. 

The new vestry made a very important agreement with the pew 
owners — ■ that the fifty-eight pews in the church should be valued at such 
valuation as the location of the pew should call for, the aggregate 
valuation not to exceed $12,000, and that the vestry should assess such 
an annual per cent, tax on such valuations as would be required to pay 
the rector's salary and other expenses of the parish, and that the pew 
should be liable for the amount taxed thereon. It was found that the 
subscriptions of the congregation could not be relied upon to fully 
pay the expenses. The subscription plan had been pursued from 18 17 
to 1830. 

The following-named pew owners agreed, by written agreement 
dated August 16, 1830, to the new plan of taxation ; namely, George B. 

* Mr. Carlisle Tyler Allen died at the house of his daughter, Mrs. Howard H. 
Baker, in Buffalo, November i, 1892, in the 86th year of his age. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 43 

Webster, R. H. Heywood, Dyre Tillinghast, Henry Hamilton, James 
D. Sheppard, John G. Camp, Sylvester Matthews, Jacob A. Barker, 
Zenas W. Barker, Josiah Trowbridge, Benjamin Rathbun, Stephen K. 
Grosvenor, Sheldon Thompson, Horatio Warren, Joseph Shaw, Manly 
Colton, John Root, Elias Ransom, Elias Green, William Williams, Jesse 
Peck, Cyrus Athearn, G. H. Goodrich, T. W. Sherman, John Lay, Jr., 
Noah P. Sprague, R. Hargrave Lee, Jeremiah Staats, Harry Slade, John 
B. Stone, John W. Beals, Elizabeth Granger, Lucius Gould, Elijah Ford. 
Bishop Hobart died September 12, 1830, in Auburn, N. Y., during 
his annual visitation. His diocese extended 300 miles from east to 
west, and he traversed it every year, mostly in stages over indifferent 
roads, and only in part by the Erie Canal. Rev. Benjamin T. Onder- 
donck, D. D., was elected bishop, October 8, 1830, by the Diocesan 
convention of New York, and was consecrated November 26, 1830. 



183I. 

At the annual election of wardens and vestrymen, April 4, 1831, 
George B. Webster and R. H. Heywood were elected wardens, and 
Henry Hamilton, Zenas W. Barker, Jerry Ratcliff, Pierre A. Barker, 
Cyrus Athearn, Benjamin Rathbun, Jeremiah Staats and Sheldon 
Thompson, vestrymen. 

The missionary stipend of $125 having been withdrawn by the 
diocese from the rector, it being considered that the parish should be 
self-supporting, the vestry, on July 6, 183 1, resolved that the salary of 
the rector should be $800 per annum, the same that it was when 
he received the said stipend. 

August 29, 1 83 1, the vestry resolved to erect galleries on both sides 
of the church edifice. 

October 28, 1831, twenty pews having been erected in the galleries, 
the vestry placed an aggregate valuation on them of $1,350, to be sold 
at said valuation, subject to the same tax as the ground floor. 



44 History of St. Paul's Church. 



1832. 

Buffalo was incorporated as a city in 1832, with a population of 
10,000. 

At the annual parish election, April 23, 1832, George B. Webster and 
Dr. Josiah Trowbridge were elected wardens, and Henry Hamilton, 
Sheldon Thompson, Jacob A. Barker, Guy H. Goodrich, Sylvester 
Matthews, Benjamin Rathbun, Zenas W. Barker and John Lay, Jr., 
vestrymen. 

George B. Webster was appointed treasurer, and Martin Chittenden 
clerk ; and on September 25, 1832, Henry Morris was appointed clerk 
in the place of Martin Chittenden, deceased. 

March 13, 1833, a committee was appointed to sell the " Glebe lot," 
in order to raise funds to liquidate the debts of the parish, but no sale 
was effected. 

1833- 

At the annual election, April 8, 1833, George B. Webster and Dr. 
Josiah Trowbridge were elected wardens, and Sheldon Thompson, Guy 
H. Goodrich, Pierre A. Barker, Jacob A. Barker, William B. Rochester, 
Lester Brace, George E. Hayes and Henry Hamilton, vestrymen, and 
Henry Morris was appointed clerk. The services of James D. Shep- 
pard, organist, having been dispensed with in March, the new vestiy 
reappointed him at the salary of $125, to be paid by subscription, 
but he having declined to serve at that sum, it was agreed that he 
should have what could be collected for the object. September 3, 
1833, it was resolved to circulate a subscription in addition to the pew 
taxes to pay the salary of the rector, and those pew owners who had 
not given their written consent to have their pews taxed to defray the 
parish expenses, were requested to do so. It was also resolved to 



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PLAN OF GALLERIES, BASEMENT, AND ELEVATION OF PART OF SOUTH 
ST. PAUL'S FRAME CHURCH. 



AISLE, 



History of St. Paul's Church. 45 

finish off a room in the basement of the church for a Sunday School 
room, provided the cost should be paid by subscription. At this time 
Stephen Walker commenced acting as teacher in the Sunday School, 
and also as superintendent. Dr. Shelton took charge of the Sunday 
School scholars of more advanced age, and faithfully instructed them 
in church principles and Christian doctrines. These scholars became 
teachers in after years. 

1834. 

At the annual election, March 31, 1834, the same vestry were 
reelected, except that Sylvester Matthews was elected vestryman in 
place of G. H. Goodrich. Henry Morris was reappointed clerk of 
the vestry and George B. Webster treasurer. 

1835- 

April 7, 183s, George B. Webster, Pierre A. Barker and Sylvester 
Matthews were appointed a committee to ascertain whether a loan 
could be obtained for the purpose of building a church edifice. April 
17, 1835, the clerk of the vestry was authorized to execute in the name 
of the parish a note to the Rev. William Shelton for $234.60, being the 
balance due on his salary to Easter, 1835. 

At the annual election, April 20, 1835, George B. Webster and 
Henry Hamilton were elected wardens, and William B. Rochester, 
Sheldon Thompson, Lester Brace, Sylvester Matthews, George E. 
Hayes, Horatio Stevens, Pierre A. Barker and Jacob A. Barker, ves- 
trymen. Dr. Elliott Burwell was appointed clerk of the vestry on 
September 9, 1835. (Pierre A. Barker and Jacob A. Barker were not 
kinsmen.) 

In 1835 the Rev. Dr. Shelton was elected the first President of the 
Young Men's Association, afterwards the Buffalo Library. 



46 . History of St. Paul's Church. 



1836. 

January 5, 1836, at an informal meeting of the vestry, the wardens 
not being present, it was resolved that it was expedient to change 
the location of the church edifice, and George E. Hayes, Benjamin 
Rathbun and Pierre A. Barker were appointed a committee to 
ascertain what the church property could be sold for, and what 
sites could be obtained for a new edifice, and other information on 
the subject. 

At the annual election, April 4, 1836, George B. Webster and Henry 
Hamilton were elected wardens, and Jacob A. Barker, Pierre A. 
Barker, Sheldon Thompson, Josiah Trowbridge, Guy H. Goodrich, R. 
H. Heywood, George E. Hayes and Richard Sears, vestrymen. George 
B. Webster was appointed treasurer by the vestry on April 5th. It was 
resolved that the committee appointed January 5th be discharged from 
the further consideration of changing the location of the church, and it 
was further resolved that it was expedient for the vestry to proceed to 
erect a new church edifice on the same site. George B. Webster, R. H. 
Heywood, Henry Hamilton, Jacob A. Barker and Pierre A. Barker 
were appointed a committee to procure plans and estimates, and 
devise ways and means. 

September 12, 1836, Elijah Ford was appointed clerk of the vestry ; 
at the same meeting it was resolved that the rector should read a notice 
calling a meeting of those desirous of forming a new parish in Buffalo ; 
in the ensuing winter Trinity parish was organized by several members 
from St. Paul's. 

1837- 

At the annual election, March 27, 1837, George B. Webster and 
Henry Hamilton were elected wardens, and Sheldon Thompson, 



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History of St. Paul's Church. 47 

Josiah Trowbridge, Jacob A. Barker, R. H. Heywood, George E. 
Hayes, William Williams, Stephen Walker and Lester Brace, vestrymen. 
Elijah Ford was appointed clerk. 

September 19, 1837, a committee was appointed to raise a subscrip- 
tion to paint the church edifice. 



1838. 

At the annual election on April 16, 1838, George B. Webster and 
Henry Hamilton were elected wardens, and R. H. Heywood, Lester 
Brace, Stephen Walker, George E. Hayes, Josiah Trowbridge, Sheldon 
Thompson, Jacob A. Barker and William Williams, vestrymen. Elijah 
Ford was appointed clerk, and George B. Webster treasurer. 



1839. 

At the annual election, April i, 1839, George B. Webster and 
Henry Hamilton were elected wardens, and William Williams, R. H. 
Heywood, Elijah Ford, Walter Joy, Stephen Walker, Lester Brace, 
Sheldon Thompson and Dr. James P. White, vestrymen. Joseph G. 
Hasten was appointed clerk, and George B. Webster treasurer. 

April 23, 1839, it having been represented to the vestry that many 
of the congregation were dissatisfied with the church music, George 
B. Webster, Lester Brace and Dr. James P. White were appointed a 
committee on music. 

1840. 

At the annual election, April 20, 1840, the same vestry was 
reelected, and Joseph G. Hasten was reappointed clerk 



48 History of St. Paul's Church. 



1841. 

At the annual election, 1841, the same vestry was reelected, except 
that Joseph G. Masten was elected vestryman in place of Sheldon 
Thompson. Jesse Walker was appointed clerk, and William Williams 
treasurer. A note was authorized to be given to the Rev. William 
Shelton for $833.69, for the amount due on his salary up to Easter, 
1841. This and the other notes to the rector were given in conse- 
quence of the non-payment of pew taxes to the amount of the notes. 

June 7, 1841, the treasurer reported to the vestry that $1,650 would 
be required for the expenses of the parish up to Easter, 1842. 

August II, 1841, it was reported to the vestry that $391.89 had 
been received for timber sold from the " Glebe lot." Taxes on the lot 
$9.01 for 1841. In 1841 St. Paul's was newly painted and fitted up. 

March 26, 1842, a note was authorized to be given the Rev. William 
Shelton for $281.25, for the amount due on his salary up to Easter, 1842. 

1842. 

At the annual election, March 28, 1842, George B. Webster and 
Henry Hamilton were elected wardens, and R. H. Heywood, Stephen 
Walker, Joseph G. Masten, Walter Joy, Lester Brace, Elijah Ford, 
William Williams, Edward S. Warren, vestrymen. Jesse Walker was 
reappointed clerk. 

1843. 

March 16, 1843, William Williams made a full written report on the 
condition of the organ. 

At the annual election, April 17, 1843, George B. Webster and 
Henry Hamilton were elected wardens, and R. H. Heywood, Lester 



History of St. Paul's Church. 49 

Brace, Stephen Walker, William Williams, Josiah Trowbridge, Jacob A. 
Barker, Richard Sears and Elijah Ford, vestrymen. Jesse Walker was 
reappointed clerk. 

The election of April 17, 1843, was quite exciting, church music 
being the question ; 57 votes were cast, being almost three times the 
usual number. 

1844. 

At the annual election, April 8, 1844, the vestry of 1843 were all 
reelected, and Jesse Walker was reappointed clerk, and William 
Williams treasurer. 

April II, 1844, R. H. Heywood, George B. Webster and William 
Williams were appointed a committee to purchase a rectory. It was 
resolved to make a plank sidewalk around the church. It was also 
resolved that all funds received from sales of pews should be appro- 
priated to pay the debt due to the rector. 

May 22, 1844, it was resolved to make a sale of the "Glebe lot," 
and to use the proceeds of the sale in purchasing a lot in the city for a 
rectory. William Williams and Elijah Ford were appointed a com- 
mittee to negotiate the sale thereof. It was also resolved that Josiah 
Trowbridge, George B. Webster, R. H. Heywood and Stephen Walker 
should be a committee to enquire into the practicability of building a 
new church edifice on the site of the old one, and to collect information 
relative to the same. 

June 10, 1844, R. H. Heywood reported that he had purchased 
twenty-four feet on Pearl Street at $80 per foot for the rectory. The 
vestry also determined to buy the additional four feet front of Doctor 
Burwell, adjoining the twenty-four feet. 

November 15, 1844, the committee appointed to sell the " Glebe 
lot " reported that they had received a proposition from Moses Cherry 
and Samuel F. Gelston to purchase the lot for $1,500, being $15 per acre. 
The vestry accepted the proposition, the Court of Chancery granted 
the necessary legal consent for the vestry to make the sale, and the 



50 History of St. Paul's Church. 

rector, wardens and vestrymen executed the deed to the purchasers. 
The land was on the Military Road, some five miles from St. Paul's 
Church. Forty years afterwards it would have sold for $400 per acre, 
but in 1844 f 15 per acre was about the usual price.* 

1845. 

At the annual election, March 23, 1845, George B. Webster and 
Henry Hamilton were elected wardens, and William Williams, Lester 
Brace, R. H. Heywood, Jacob A. Barker, Elijah Ford, Albert Hayden, 
Alexander H. Caryl and Stephen Walker, vestrymen. Asher P. 
Nichols was appointed clerk, William Williams treasurer, and James 
D. Sheppard organist. 

March 26, 1845, Albert Hayden, Grosvenor Clark, William A. 
Thompson, Silas Heminway, and Walter Joy were appointed a com- 
mittee to procure subscriptions for the building of a rectory on the 
recently purchased twenty-eight feet front on the west side of Pearl 
Street, south of Church Street. February 17, 1846, R. H. Heywood, 
Albert Hayden and Grosvenor Clark were appomted a building com- 
mittee for the erection of a rectory on the above-mentioned lot. 

A most important event in the well-being of the parish took place 
in the year 1845, in the marriage of the rector, the Rev. William Shel- 
ton, D. D., to Mrs. Lucretia S. Grosvenor. They were married in the 
presence of a very large congregation, in St. Paul's Church, by the Rt. 
Rev. William Heathcote De Lancey, D. D., in the evening of April 7, 
1845. Every member of the congregation was invited to the wedding. 
The reception took place the same evening at the rectory on the 
north-east corner of Main and North Division streets, and was largely 
attended. Mrs. Grosvenor was the widow of Stephen K. Grosvenor, 
who resided on Pearl Street, south of Swan Street, and the sister-in-law 
of Seth Grosvenor, a prominent merchant in the city of New York. 

* The actual selling price of this land in 1893 (forty-nine years after the sale) 
averaged fifteen hundred dollars per acre, the loo-acre lot having therefore become 
worth $150,000 — just 100 times what the church sold it for in 1844. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 51 

Before her marriage to Mr. Grosvenor she was Miss Lucretia Stanley, 
of Geneva, N. Y. 

In 1845 St. John's Church was organized by several members from 
St. Paul's and Trinity parishes. 

1846. 

At the annual election, April 13, 1846, George B. Webster and R. 
H. Heywood were elected wardens and William Williams, Lester Brace, 
Alexander H. Caryl, Elijah Ford, Albert Hayden, Grosvenor Clark, 
Samuel D. Flagg and Stephen Walker, vestrymen. At a meeting of the 
vestry, April 27th, Asher P. Nichols was elected clerk, and William Wil- 
liams treasurer ; and George C. Webster, DeWitt C. Weed, and William 
H. Walker were appointed a committee to seat strangers and others in 
the church on Sundays. This was the first committee appointed in the 
parish to attend to that duty. The building committee was authorized 
to proceed in the erection of the rectory, according to the plans 
submitted to the vestry, and to collect the subscriptions therefor. 

1847. 

March 14, 1847, the vestry resolved to effect a loan of $r,6oo on 
the rectory, for the purpose of completing the same. Fifteen hun- 
dred and forty dollars was subsequently loaned. 

At the annual election, April 5, 1847, George B. Webster and R. 
H. Heywood were elected wardens, and William Williams, Lester 
Brace, Elijah Ford, Stephen Walker, Samuel D. Flagg, Albert Hayden, 
Grosvenor Clark and Henry Hagar, vestrymen. Asher P. Nichols was 
appointed clerk, and William Williams treasurer. 

The rectory on the west side of Pearl Street, northerly of and 
near Erie Street, was completed in the fall of 1S47, and cost, including 
the lot on which it was built, the sum of $8,075.72. On its comple- 
tion the Rev. Doctor Shelton removed into it from his residence on 
the north-east corner of Main and North Division streets. 



52 History of St. Paul's Church. 

1848. 

January 13, 1848, the vestry adopted a communication to be sub- 
mitted to the congregation, calling for the united effort of the parish 
to erect a new church edifice, and at a subsequent meeting on February 
ist, George B. Webster, R. H. Heywood and William Williams were 
appointed a committee to correspond with Richard Upjohn, the archi- 
tect, of New York City, and to invite him to furnish plans and esti- 
mates for the contemplated church edifice. Mr. Upjohn was the 
architect of Trinity Church, New York City. 

At the annual election, April 24, 1848, George B. Webster and 
R. H. Heywood were elected wardens, and William Williams, Samuel 
D. Flagg, Henry Hagar, Stephen Walker, Lester Brace, Elijah Ford, 
John L. Kimberly and Edward L. Stevenson, vestrymen, and on May 
30, 1848, Charles W. Evans was appointed clerk, and William Williams 
treasurer. 

June 2, 1848, Mr. Heywood, from the committee on the valuation 
of the pews in the contemplated church edifice, made a report accord- 
ing to the general plan of Mr. Upjohn, in which the pews were num-- 
bered from i to 208, with the valuations from $700 down to $75, 
making an aggregate valuation of $71,020, reserving a pew for the 
rector and twenty-two pews for free sittings. 

July 8, 1848, the vestry adopted the form of the subscription paper 
to raise $48,000 for the contemplated church edifice, the subscriptions 
to be payable in six equal installments, at four, eight, twelve, sixteen, 
twenty and twenty-four months, and the Rev. Dr. Shelton was 
requested to obtain the subscriptions for the said amount. The paper 
was copied into a suitable book bound in red,* and Dr. Shelton 
obtained signatures therein for the full sum of $48,000. He was now 
fifty years of age, and in the prime of life. 

* See appendix for the several subscription lists, from 1848 to 1871, as copied from 
this " red book," carried by Dr. Shelton for so many years, and once so familiar to the 
older parishioners. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



53 



ffiret Subscrfptlon 3Lf8t, for JSuUOtng tbe IRew Cburcb, 1848.* 



COMPILED FROM THE TREASURER'S BOOK. 



Abel Archer 

Jabez B. Bull 

Jacob A. Barker 

Benjamin Brent 

Lester Brace '. ■ . 

Ira A. Blossom 

Curtiss L. Brace 

George N. Burwell 

George W. Bull 

George L. Burns 

A. H. Caryl 

Mrs. Sylvia Chapin '. . 

H. S. Chamberlin 

B. C. Caryl and N. H. Warner. . 

Henry Colton 

Philo Dubois 

James V. DeWitt 

Charles W. Evans 

Lewis Eaton 

James C. Evans 

EUicott Evans '. 

Elijah Ford 

Austin Flint 

Samuel D. Flagg ... 

David Forbey 

Seth H. Grosvenor 

Guy H. Goodrich. 

George Gibson 

Russell H. Hey wood 

Israel T. Hatch 

Robert Hart 

Asa E. Hart 

Henry Hagar. '. 

Henry Hamilton 

John Hebard 

George E. Hayes 

Albert Hayden 

Walter Joy 

John L. Kimberly 

Robert Kittle 

John T. Lacy 

A. I. Mathews 

Mrs. E. B. Mathews 

S. L. Meech loooo $48,870.00 

* The above is the subscription list of the building fund of 1848, compiled from the Treasurer's 
book, and being for the:$48,coo raised by the exertions of Dr. Shelton. It will be noticed tliat the 



$ 50 


00 


300 


00 


500 


00 


100 


00 


400 


00 


600 


CO 


200 


00 


500 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


400 


00 


150 


00 


200 


00 


500 


00 


360 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


1,000 


00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


1,000 


00 


100 


00 


400 


00 


50 


00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


50 


CO 


5,000 


00 


1,200 


00 


300 


00 


500 


00 


1,500 


00 


400 


00 


250 


00 


500 


00 


400 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,500 


00 


125 


CO 


250 


00 


500 


00 


200 


00 


100 


00 



Thomas Mathews 

Henry Moore 

Asher P. Nichols 

John Patterson 

John Pease 

Mrs. Lydia Pomeroy . . . . 

James P. Provoost 

Loring Peirce 

John E. Russell 

Jesse Ralph 

Thomas Savage 

J. W. Sanford 

Horatio Seymour, Jr. . . . 

Henry K. Smith 

Edward L. Stevenson . . . . 

William Sutton 

Seth E. Sill 

Silas Sawin 

William Shelton 

Jeremiah Staats 

James D. Sheppard 

John D. Shepard 

Henry H. Sizer 

Henry Streater 

George Truscott 

A. Porter Thompson 

Sheldon Thompson 

Albert H. Tracy 

William A. Thompson. . . 

Henry K. Viele 

Mrs. S. B. Van deVenter. 

William H. Walker 

George B. Webster 

George C. Webster 

Nelson Willard 

William Williams 

F. S. Wheeler 

Edward S. Warren 

Mrs. Louisa M. Weed. . . 

DeWitt C. Weed 

Stephen Walker 

G. R. Wilson 

George J. Webb 



100 
200 
100 

,000 

500 
500 
500 
10 
200 
100 
too 
100 
200 
500 
,000 
200 
500 
300 
500 
200 
500 
400 
500 
200 
500 
500 
,400 
,000 
300 
500 
300 
225 
,500 
500 
600 

,100 
100 

700 
,400 

,200 
250 
500 
200 



00 
00 
00 
CO 

00 
00 
00 

00 
00 
00 

00 

00 

00 
00 

CO 

00 
00 

00 

00 
00 

00 
00 
00 
CO 

00 

00 
00 

00 

00 
00 

00 

00 
00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 
00 
00 

CO 

00 

00 



54 History of St. Paul's Church. 

October i6, 1848, the vestry resolved that the plans and estimates 
of the contemplated church edifice, furnished by Mr. Upjohn, be re- 
turned to him, and that he be requested so to modify them as to reduce 
the whole expense to an amount as near fifty thousand dollars as could 
be done, without materially changing the plans. 

December 14, 1848, the vestry ordered to be recorded in the vestry 
book the agreement made by the pew owners that they would surren- 
der the pews in the old edifice at a reduced valuation for a propor- 
tionate value in the new edifice, instead of requiring corresponding 
pews in the new edifice. In the agreement it is stated that the 
old edifice was inadequate to the accommodation of the congregation 
and to the increase of the population of the city, that they hoped to be 
able by a united and vigorous effort on the part of the parish to erect 
an edifice to the glory of God which would be attractive and command- 
ing in its architectural proportions, taste and beauty, and which would 
be creditable to the zeal and enterprise of the parish and city, and 
remain an object of delight and affectionate attachment and reverence 
to their children, and for generations to come. The agreement was 
signed by DeWitt C. Weed, Henry Hagar, Grosvenor Clark, Nelson 
Willard, R. H. Heywood, George B. Webster, George E. Hayes, Henry 
Hamilton, Edward L. Stevenson, James D. Long, Jacob A. Barker, A. 
H. Caryl, Ira A. Blossom, William Williams, Benjamin C. Caryl, Lewis 
Eaton, John Patterson, Sheldon Thompson, James L. Barton, Lester 
Brace, James P. Provoost, John L. Kimberly, John Pease, Walter Joy, 
Lucius H. Pratt, Guy H. Goodrich, Elijah Ford, Albert H. Tracy, 

subscriptions as piven amount to $48,870. Several of the subscriptions were not paid — the amount 
really collected being something over $48,000. These subscriptions were made in the form of pur- 
chase of stock in the new church, the subscribers receiving deeds of pews in proportion to the 
amounts of their several subscriptions. It is also well to remark that the above list represents less 
than one third of the entire amount given for the building of the church. There were many sub- 
sequent subscription lists circulated, and large additional sums were given by the same men and 
women who subscribed to this 1848 list, and also by many whose names do not appear at all in this 
list. The above list is interesting, however, as showing the names of those who subscribed when 
it was first decided to build the new church. As given, it is arranged alphabetically ; the origi- 
nal list was headed with the $5,000 given by Mr. Russell H. Heywood, then, and for many years, 
one of the wardens of the parish. See appendix for original and subsequent lists. 



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History of St. Paul's Church. 55 

Josiah Trowbridge, George W. Allen, Henry H. Sizer, John T. Lacy, 
Seth E. Sill, John Hebard, Edward S. Warren, John E. Russell. 

1849. 

At a meeting of the vestry, held at the house of George B. Webster, on 
Swan Street, west of Franklin Street, March 28, 1849, Richard Upjohn, 
the architect, submitted his new plans, dated in 1849, by adopting which 
the cost of the contemplated church edifice would be reduced to 
$50,872, being $16,772 for stone work, $16,900 for stone cutting, $15,700 
for carpenter work and materials, and $1,500 for stained glass. Add 
to the $50,872 the sum of $2,544 for Mr. Upjohn's commissions, and 
$1,500 for the superintendeni's time, would make it $54,916. Mr. 
Upjohn stated that if the proposed chapel were left off, the cost would 
be reduced $5,740, and that if a certain uniform quality of the red sand- 
stone could be procured, the stone cutters estimated the stone cutting 
to be $4,000 less than the Lockport gray limestone, which was originally 
designed to be used. 

Mr. Williams, Mr. Webster and Mr. Upjohn went to Lockport on 
the 29th of March and returned next day, and reported it was thought 
that sufificient of the red sandstone could be procured. A quarry of 
the red sandstone was subsequently purchased at Hulburton, on the 
Erie Canal, east of Lockport.* 

At a meeting of the vestry, held at the house of George B.Webster, it 
was resolved that the plans of Mr. Upjohn, for the church edifice, dated 



*January 31, 1850, in the minutes of the building committee's meetings, this 
quarry is described : — "A purchase at Hulburton of Samuel Copeland of from three 
to four acres of stone quarry on the south-west corner of his wood lot, in the name of 
Mr. Streater. The deed to be taken on March ist next and paid for at the rate of $80 
per acre." This was reported by Mr. Williams (the superintendent) and Mr. 
Streater, who had been sent to Hulburton by the committee. In the account book, 
under date March 7, 1850, is the entry : — 

" To purchase of quarry of Samuel Copeland, Hulburton, by Henry 
Streater, conveyed to him I272.72 " 



$6 History of St. Paul's Church. 

in 1 849, be adopted, and carried out as far as the present or future sub- 
scriptions would permit, discontinuing, if necessary, the main tower at 
the lowest part compatible with the completion of the main building. 

The vestry having resolved to build the church edifice, it is inter- 
esting to note the financial condition of the parish. William Williams, 
the treasurer, made his annual report to the vestry on the 9th of April, 
1849, in which he stated that the receipts for pew rents for the year 
ending on that day were $1,964.63, and the disbursements were 
$1,900.27. The rector's salary was $1,200, and $1,000 was due him 
for the salary of the previous year, and $1,000 was due to him on his 
year's salary up to April 9, 1849. The treasurer also reported that 
$1,486.50 was due for pew rents, of which only $437.96 was available- 

The anr^ual election was held on Easter Monday, April 9, 1849. 
George B. Webster and R. H. Hey wood were elected wardens, and 
Lester Brace, William Williams, Samuel D. Flagg, Stephen Walker, 
John L. Kimberly, Henry Hagar, Edward L. Stevenson, Elijah Ford, 
vestrymen. .\ Charles W. Evan's was reappointed clerk, and William 
Williams treasurer. 

May 21, 1849, ■^- H. Heywood, E. L. Stevenson, George B. Web.ster, 
Sheldon Thompson and William Williams were constituted the building 
committee for the erection of the church edifice. Sheldon Thompson, 
being unable to serve, declined, and Jacob A. Barker was appointed in 
his place * 

July 9, 1849, the vestry authorized the building committee to 
appoint Thomas R. Williams of New Jersey to superintend the erec- 
tion of the church edifice, at a salary not exceeding $1,000 per annum, 
he having been recommended for the position by Mr. Upjohn. 



* The work of this committee was by no means an easy task. The old records 
and account-books, in the handwriting of Jacob A. Barker, the treasurer of the 
building ftind, and others, show the great amount of labor undertaken by the com- 
mittee. They made all of their own contracts, hired the men, and attended to all the 
details of the work, which are now usually relegated to the head contractors. Page 
after page of the names of the men who worked on the building, with the hours each 
worked peir week, and the amounts paid them, are found in the old records. The 



History of Si. Paul's Church. 57 

August 10, 1849, the rector having announced the death of Wil- 
liam Williams — one of the vestry and the treasurer of the parish, and 
one of the building committee — suitable resolutions were adopted stat- 
ing that his attachment to the church, her institutions, sacraments and 
appointments, his liberality upon every proper occasion, his steady 
adhesion to principle, his uniform correctness of demeanor, his enlight- 
ened views, sound judgment and efficient conduct, had secured the 
lasting esteem and respect of the vestry. 

Eliza Hollister Williams, the wife of the deceased, was stricken 
with cholera at Niagara Falls, and he had symptoms of it in Buffalo ; 
he immediately went to her and they both died at the Falls, on August 
I, 1849, s^ch aged fifty- five years, and were buried in one grave at the 
same time, in Buffalo. They left one child, J ohn W. Williams. William 
Williams and his wife had resided in Buffalo for twenty-five years. 

August 20, 1849, the vestry appointed Jacob A. Barker treasurer 
of the parish, and DeWitt C. Weed as one of the building committee, 
in place of William Williams, deceased. Early in September, 1849, 
the stone foundation for the church edifice was commenced on that 
part of the lot on the corner of Church and Pearl streets. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker, George C. Webster, DeWitt 
C. Weed, Benjamin F. Green and Augustus A. Goodrich were appointed 
a committee to dress the church for Christmas, 1849, being the last 
time the old edifice was so dressed ; several of the young ladies of the 
congregation were associated with them. The first four of the com- 
mittee were then prominent, and had been since 1847, and were so for 
many years afterwards, as the "junior vestry" of St. Paul's Church, so 
termed from their interest in parish affairs and in the construction of 

following entry in the building committee's minute? may not be uninteresting, as 
showing what were considered fair wages to workmen at that time : Under date of 
March 7, 1850: — "It was determined that Mr. Williams be authorized to hire Mr. 
George Riker to superintend the carpenter and joiner work of the church, provided 
he will engage for two dollars per day, and that he also employ a number of masons, 
•competent to do the rubble work, at a price not exceeding 1 3 shillings ($1.63) per day." 



58 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



the new edifice, and for their efforts in influencing contributions for 
the building fund. Three of them, Messrs. Evans, Weed and Walker, 
became vestrymen in after years, and two of them, Messrs. Evans and 
Walker, became wardens. Mr. George C. Webster was afterwards one 
of the founders, and also warden of the Church of the Ascension. 

A building fund association was formed October 24, 1847, by most if 
not all the young persons in the parish, to contribute from time to time 
small sums for the proposed edifice. Nearly $1,600 was the amount of 
their contributions by the year 1849. In January, 1848, the young 
ladies of the congregation formed their society for the same object.* 

* The St. Paul's Building Fund Association was formed October 24, 1847, there 
being present at the first meeting Charles W. Evans, George C. Webster, William H. 
Walker and DeWitt C. Weed. Subsequently a constitution was adopted and officers 
elected — namely, three trustees, George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood and Wil- 
liam Williams, all from the vestry, and DeWitt C. Weed was appointed secretary. It 
will thus be seen that the first concerted work for the building of the new church 
edifice was begun by the four young men named above, and who in after years con- 
tinued to be most active and liberal in promoting the prosperity of the parish. The 
names of those who joined the association were as follows, their original signatures 
being in the book of the minutes of the association : 
Charles W. Evans, 
George C. Webster, 
DeWitt C. Weed, 
Wm. H. Walker, 
John W. Williams, 
George T. Weed, 
John E. Hart, 
A. I. Mathews, 
N. B. Barrows, 
Robert Kittle, 
J. B. Eaton, 
Walter Joy, 
J. H. Lee, 
Geo. Truscott, Jr , 
S. H. Grosvenor, 
George J. Webb, 
James Van de Venter, 
O. H. P. Champlin, 
Horatio Seymour, Jr., 
Lewis B. Joy, 
William Shelton, 
William E. Woodruff, 



Charles R. Heywood, 
Nathaniel Cooper, 
A. H. Caryl, 
John E. Russell, 
Asher P. Nichols, 
Elijah Ford, 
Henry Moore, 
Henry Colton, 
Sheldon Thompson, 
John W. Heywood, 
lieo. E. Hayes, 
John Pease, 
Jacob A. Barker, 
Samuel D. Flagg, 
Henry W. Ford, 
Francis W. Tracy, 
A. Haller Tracy, 
Miss L. A. D. Hubbard, 
Miss Lucy Anna Blossom, 
Miss S. Louisa Weed, 
Miss Julia M. Webster, 
Miss H. J. Webster, 



Miss Jane R. Webster, 
Miss C. B. Webster, 
Mrs. Jacob A. Barker, 
Mrs. Elijah Ford, 
Mrs. S. D. Flagg, 
Miss M. Ruden, 
Mrs. George E. Hayes, 
Mrs. John Pease, 
Mrs. Louisa M. Weed, 
Mrs. Sylvia Chapin, 
Mathew O'Neill, 
Henry E. Wells, 
S. D. Flagg, Jr., 

C. E. Marsh, 
Mrs. E. J. Root, 

D. H. Hawkins, 
Caroline Grosvenor, 
Geo. N. Burwell, 
Mrs. Mary Kimberly, 
R. A. Richardson, 
Thomas Jones, 
Stephen Walker. 




PLAN OF ST. PAUL'S FRAME CHURCH. 
As it was after its enlargement in 1828 up to its removal in 1850, with names of 
holders in 1S49, inserted from the old records. 



pew 



From drawing by John Hefford, 1849. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 59 

1850. 

March 8, 1850, the building committee reported that they had sold 
the old church edifice to the German Evangelical Church of Buffalo 
for f 800, including all above the foundation, the carpets in the aisles, 
glass chandeliers, side lamps, stoves and the cushions belonging to the 
desk and pulpit, but reserving the bell,* organ and font, and all other 
furniture belonging to the church. 

The building committee also reported that they had rented Clinton 
Hall, on the south-east corner of Clinton and Washington streets, for 
one year, from March 17, 1850, for f2io rent, in which to conduct the 
worship of the parish. Clinton Hall, in after years, was converted into 
a church for the French Roman Catholics. The annual expenses of 
the parish were assessed on the pews in Clinton Hall for the year 
ending Easter, 185 1, and the church organ was removed to the gallery 
therein. 

The last service in the old church edifice was held on Sunday, 
March 17, 1850. 

The "Buffalo Commercial Advertiser" of March 9, 1850, said that 
"the estimable rector who had occupied the pulpit of St. Paul's for over 
twenty years must part with the old edifice, wherein he had so long min- 
istered in holy things, with many heart-felt regrets, and that despite all 
our philosophy, all our ideas of progress, and of utilitarian adaptation, 
there are memories in associations which are sacred and cannot be 
broken without emotion." A correspondent of the same paper of 
March i6th, remarked, in relation to the same subject, that "there were 
those in that day who thought of their happiest and brightest years as 
connected with the consecrated place. It was beneath its paternal 
roof that they first breathed their earliest aspirations for all that was 
good and pure and holy. It was there they had learned many a 
dear lesson of life in the calm moments of worship, listening to 

* This bell was afterwards hung in the small tower of the new church edifice. 



6o History of St. Paul's Church. 

the solemn liturgy of the church, or hearing the good words of that 
good man who had watched over them as they ripened from infancy 
into mature age. It was there that those came whose hearts were 
oppressed with weariness, fleeing from the world, and hoping as 
they knelt to share the influence of that holy place. How many a 
breathing sigh, how many a heart-felt prayer, had been offered there 
and strength given to meet the sad things of the world. Some bright 
scenes of life remain for the memory to rest upon of friendships early 
formed and never broken, of cherished ties of sympathy and aflEec- 
tion, and before that altar hearts had been given unto hearts for all 
coming time." 

Dr. Shelton preached his farewell sermon in the old edifice, on 
March 17, 1850, from the text in the 60th chapter of Isaiah and 22d 
verse, " A little one shall become a thousand, and a small one a strong 
nation." He alluded to the more than thirty years gone by, where 
upon the place that this house of God had so long stood, there was a 
bare and uncultivated commons, in the small and inconsiderable village, 
not exceeding 1,000 or 1,500 souls. No affluence then prevailed. He 
then referred to the new city filled with lofty edifices, costly structures 
and graced by much that is elegant and adorned by that which is 
useful. He contrasted the present with the original congregation, how 
great was the labor, how much the sacrifice which they undertook and 
accomplished, who from the midst of such comparative poverty, with 
such feeble numbers, erected this edifice and dedicated it to the worship 
of God. Honor and praise to the good hearts and faithful spirits, the 
zealous and proper-minded men and women who allowed not their 
scanty means to stand between them and the accomplishment of the 
object more valuable to themselves, to their children, to the true pros- 
perity and well-being of the land in which they lived, than any other 
thing ! Thousands have enjoyed essential benefits and been blessed in 
their religion, crowned with happiness and eternal glory, through the 
means provided for their worship in this time- honored house of prayer. 
But such is the instability of all earthly things, such the shortness and 




THE REVEREND DR. SHELTON. 
Ai about the age of fifty-two. 



From a Dag^uerreotype made 
about the year 1850. 



History of St. Paul's Church. * 6i 

uncertainty of life, that but few remain within these walls, this day, 
who were instrumental in their erection. A few, thinly scattered over 
this assembly, remain to take their leave of an edifice in which they 
have had a strong interest from its first commencement, and continued 
with unshaken attachment during all its being, surviving the loss of 
friends and associates, and adhering to it with firmness and constancy 
through all the varying fortunes of so many changes and so many 
trials. He spoke of his long ministry of twenty years in the old edifice, 
and the thankfulness he felt that he had been permitted so many years 
in comparative peace and prosperity. Change upon change had marked 
the footsteps of others, either death or a desire of change, or the com- 
mon accidents of life had removed from every other pulpit its occu- 
pant. During a very long period he had been, he hoped, he trusted, 
he almost believed, their faithful pastor, companion and friend. He 
would take the occasion to say that for all they had done, felt for him, 
and forgiven him, he gave them his hearty thanks, and the assurance 
that there should be a renewed effort to do his duty with increasing 
zeal and a hope that future exertions would be crowned with more 
complete success. 

He spoke of the honored dead, the good they had done, and that 
we had parted from both old and young, some of our best, kindest, 
truest, most faithful and trusty friends. He recounted some of the 
many acts which had been done by him. There had been baptized in 
the parish i,io6, of which 950 were within the last twenty years; 
336 had been confirmed ; 348 marriages had been solemnized, of 
which 273 were by himself; the burials had been 459. He 
spoke of the instability of popular favor as among the evils to 
be looked for in the future ; the discontent and dissatisfaction of 
any portion of a congregation, whether reasonable or just, or not, is 
always sufficient to destroy its peace, and take away the happiness and 
usefulness of its minister ; and that this state of things had been essen- 
tially averted for so many years, was only to be attributed to the pro- 
tecting care and preventing grace of God. He spoke of the great 



62 * History of St. Paul's Church. 

enterprise of the contemplated church edifice, and said -that having 
but one heart and one will, actuated by no selfish emotions, moved 
by but one impulse, controlled by one absorbing thought, that of 
building and completing without debt the noble structure then com- 
menced, they would raise a monument more enduring than marble 
and more valuable than all the mere mausoleums of the world. 
With God's blessing they would provide for themselves, their chil- 
dren and their children's children, for ages to come, a house of 
worship wherein the church and doctrines of Christ should be taught 
in perfect truth and perfect simplicity. " How many yet unborn will 
call you blessed." 

At the annual election, held in Clinton Hall on Easter Monday, 
April I, 1850, Rev. Doctor Shelton presiding, George B. Webster and 
R. H. Heywood were elected wardens, and Lester Brace, John L. 
Kimberly, Stephen Walker, Henry Hagar, Samuel D. Flagg, Edward 
L. Stevenson, Elijah Ford and Edward S.Warren, vestrymen ; Charles 
W. Evans was reappointed clerk, and Jacob A. Barker, treasurer. A 
bond for $1,562, dated April i, 1850, was given to the Rev. Dr. 
Shelton for arrears of salary due to him on that day. 

The corner-stone of the new church edifice was laid on June 12, 
1850, by the Right Rev. William Heathcote DeLancey, D. D., LL. D., 
Bishop of the Diocese of Western New York. The preliminary 
services were held in St. John's Church, on the corner of Wash- 
ington and Swan streets, a very large congregation being present, 
after which a procession was formed, and, preceded by the wardens 
and vestrymen of St. Paul's, Trinity and St. John's churches, walked 
to the foundation of St. Paul's, where the ceremony of laying the 
corner-stone was performed at eleven o'clock, according to the pre- 
scribed form by the Bishop. The Rev. Dr. Shelton then delivered an 
appropriate and eloquent address, which was listened to with deep 
interest by a large audience. After which the choir sang the Gloria 
in Excelsis. Many of the clergy from Canada, Western New York 
and Buffalo were present. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 63 

Besides the usual articles deposited in the corner-stone,* there was 
placed in it a brief history of the parish inscribed on parchment, and 
the silver plate taken from the corner-stone of the old edifice erected 
in 1819. The corner-stone was marked 1850, and was placed in the 
easterly corner of one of the north-easterly angles of the edifice, in front 
of the easterly side of the chancel. 

Lester Brace, R. H. Heywood and Charles W. Evans were appointed 
lay deputies to the Diocesan Convention in Geneva, August 21, 1850. 

September 3, 1850, the vestry resolved to consolidate the debts of 
the parish, including the debt incurred for building the rectory in 
1847, by executing a mortgage on the rectory for $3,500, in favor 
of the Mutual Insurance Company of Buffalo, they having loaned the 
parish that amount. 

1851. 

At a meeting of the vestry, March 7, 1851, R. H. Heywood stated 
that the object was to take into consideration the proposed visit of the 
Rev. Dr. Shelton to Europe, they granting him leave of absence 
and advancing sufficient funds to defray his expenses. Doctor Shelton 
then stated to the vestry that, if consistent with their views, it would 
give him much pleasure to carry into effect the purpose he had long 
contemplated of visiting England and of becoming better acquainted 
with the Church of England ; that he thought an absence of six 
months from his duties would be beneficial to him, and that he knew 
of no more fitting time than the present to visit Europe. Charles W. 

* Within the stone were deposited the following documents : Holy Bible, Book 
of Common Prayer, copies of the "Churchman," and " Gospel Messenger," Constitu- 
tion and Canons of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States, Constitution 
and Canons of the Protestant Episcopal Church of Western New York, Journal of the 
last General and Diocesan Conventions, silver plate taken from the corner-stone of the 
Old Church ; a brief history of St. Paul's Parish from its organization in 18 17 to the 
present time, inscribed on parchment ; a list of the members of St. Paul's Church building 
fund, and also the names of subscribers to the edifice now in process of erection, inscribed 
in the same manner ; the daily papers of Buffalo of the date of June 11 and I2, 1850. 



64 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Evans and John Pease were accordingly appointed a committee to 
collect subscriptions for the proposed trip. 

Sheldon Thompson died March 13, 185 1, in the sixty-sixth year of his 
age. He was one of the founders of St. Paul's parish, and a member of 
its first vestry in 1817, and also of the vestries of 1818 to 1822, and of 
1830 to 1840. He married Catherine, the daughter of Benjamin Bar- 
ton, and sister ofjames L. Barton, resided at Black Rock, near Buffalo, 
in 1817, and removed to Buffalo in 1827, and was one of the vestry of 
Grace Church, organized at Black Rock in 1824. He and his imme- 
diate family were liberal contributors in building the new church edi- 
fice of St. Paul's, and his influence with those families connected with 
him by relationship, by marriage and by business arrangements, was 
very beneficial to St. Paul's. These families were the Barton family, 
Kimberly family. Pease family and the Brace family ; all lived at Black 
Rock, and all removed to Buffalo in 1827, and all of them contributed 
much to the well-being of the parish. Sheldon T. Pease and John 
Pease were the nephews of Sheldon Thompson. The father of John 
L. Kimberly married Mary, the sister of Sheldon Thompson, for his 
second wife. Peter B. Porter and his wife and children, and William A. 
Bird and his family, although residents of Black Rock, were considered 
as parishioners of St. Paul's. 

The funeral of Sheldon Thompson took place on March i6th from 
Trinity Church, St. Paul's being still unfinished. It was largely at- 
tended by both congregations. Dr. Shelton, in his sermon, said that 
the deceased was " an example of probity, of uprightness, of frugality 
in a world where costliness and extravagance were honored. His 
name was associated with the commerce and enterprise of all this world 
of waters, our inland seas. His own history is a record of the more 
important events of the western country ; his sagacious mind early 
saw that there was to be a field of successful effort which far surpassed 
the less stirring scenes of his native land, and he came in the true spirit 
of enterprise to plant himself down upon a portion of country destined, 
he foresaw, to be unsurpassed. The commerce of these lakes and the 



History of St. Paul's Church. 65 

business of this vast section of the country was then transacted by him- 
self and his associates. None but a mind peculiarly fitted for business 
could have been successful in so large an enterprise. His labors were 
crowned with success, and for years he reposed from his cares, enjoying 
domestic comfort, peace of mind, rest from labor, and the consciousness 
of having deserved the confidence of his fellow men and the respect and 
regard of those best fitted to know his worth." Catherine, his wife, 
died May 8, 1832. His children and grand-children were all members of 
St. Paul's, and his son, A. Porter Thompson,* and two of his sons-in-law, 
Edward S. Warren and Henry K. Viele, were vestrymen of the parish. 

Charles W. Evans and John Pease, having been appointed by the 
vestry a committee to collect subscriptions for the expenses of the 
Rev. Dr. Shelton to and from Europe, reported on the 2d of April, 1851, 
that they had collected $843. The vestry granted the leave of absence, 
and directed that f6oo for the rector's salary for six months from Easter 
Monday, April 21, 185 1, be paid to him in advance, in addition to the 
subscription collected by the committee. Dr. Shelton left Buffalo April 
7th, and sailed from New York, in the steamer "Baltic," on April 16, 
1851. The vestry directed that the lease of Clinton Hall be given up 
and the possession of the hall surrendered to the lessors on Easter 
Monday, April 21, 1851, which was accordingly done. 

The congregation mostly attended Trinity and St. John's churches, 
and tlie Sunday School was held in McArthur's Hall on Washington 
Street, near Eagle Street. The organ was removed from Clinton Hall 
to the basement of the rectory on Pearl Street, and subsequently sold 
to the Presbyterian Society in Fredonia, N. Y. 

On Easter Monday, April 21, 1851, the treasurer reported that he 
had received $1,985.36 for pew rent in Clinton Hall for the past year, 
and that the debts of the parish consisted of the $3,500 mortgage on the 
rectory, and the bond to the Rev. Dr. Shelton for $1,562 for arrears 
of salary prior to April r, 1850. The same vestry, clerk, treasurer 
and building committee were reelected for one year. 

* Elected Junior Warden in 1889. 



66 History of St. Paul's Church. 

At a meeting of the vestry, May 17, 1851, a proposition was sub- 
mitted by different persons to loan to the parish $2,500 to purchase a 
new organ for the church edifice, to be placed therein by the following 
October, the organ to belong to these persons until paid for by the 
parish. This offer was accepted. 

August 12, 185 1, the treasurer reported that the building committee 
had expended $52,105.73 on the church edifice, and had received from 
all sources $51,148.32, leaving a balance of $957.41 due to the treasurer. 

Rev. Dr. Shelton, having returned from England, presided at the 
vestry meeting, held at the rectory, September 12, 1851. 

At a meeting of the vestry, October 20, 185 1, the Rev. Dr. Shelton 
presented the four collection plates, elegantly made of English walnut, 
for the use of the church. The same were accepted, and the thanks of the 
vestry made to him for the very handsome and appropriate donation.* 

The new edifice of St. Paul's Church was consecrated on Wednes- 
day morning, October 22, 185 1. A procession was formed from the 
rectory on Pearl Street, and proceeded to the main entrance of the 
church, where it was tnet by the vestry, and marched in procession up 
the main aisle to the chancel, repeating the appropriate and prescribed 
Psalm. There were present Bishop DeLancey of Western New York, 
Bishop McCoskry of Michigan, Bishop Strachan of Toronto, and 
Bishop Field of Newfoundland, eight clergymen from Canada, one 
from Ohio, one from Indiana, one from Connecticut, one froiri "Penn- 
sylvania, two from New Yorkj and eighteen from Western New York, 
in all four bishops and thirty-two presbyters and deacons. The 
instrument of donation was presented by George B. Webster, the senior 
warden, and read by the Rev. Mr. Ingersoll, of Trinity Church, 
Buffalo. The instrument of consecration was read by the Rev. Dr. 
Shelton, as follows: 

Whereas, The rector, church wardens and vestrymen of St. Paul's Church, in 
the City of Buffalo, County of Erie, State of New York and Diocese of Western 
New York, have, by an instrument this day presented to me, appropriated and' given a 

* These plates were used until destroyed, with the church, in the fire of May 10, 1888. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 67 

house of worship and service of Almighty God, according to the ministry, doctrine, 
liturgy, rites and usages of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of 
America, have placed the same under my spiritual jurisdiction and that of my succes- 
sors in office, and have requested me to consecrate it by the name of St. Paul's Church. 
Now, therefore, be it known that I, William Heathcote DeLancey, D. D., Bishop of 
the Diocese of Western New York, having taken the said house of worship under my 
spiritual jurisdiction and that of my successors in office, did, on this twenty-second day 
of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty- one, under 
the protection of Almighty God, and in the presence of divers of the clergy and of a 
public congregation there assembled, consecrate the same to the worship and service of 
Almighty God, the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost, by the name of St. Paul's 
Church. And by these presents declare the said St. Paul's Church to be consecrated 
accordingly and hereby separated henceforth from all unhallowed, worldly and com- 
mon uses, and set apart and dedicated to the service of Almighty God for reading and 
preaching His holy word, for celebrating His holy sacraments, for offering to His 
Glorious Majesty the sacrifices of prayer, thanksgiving and praise, for blessing the 
people in His name, and for the performance of all other holy offices according to the 
terms of His covenant of grace and mercy, in His Son our Lord and Saviour Jesus 
Christ, and according to the ministry, doctrines, liturgy and usages of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in the United States of America. 

In testimony whereof I have hereunto affixed my hand and seal, 
[seal.] in the city of Buffalo, the day and year above written, and the 

thirteenth year of my consecration. 

WILLIAM HEATHCOTE DeLANCEY, 
Bishop of the Diocese of Western New York. 

The morning service was then performed, the sermon was preached 
by Bishop DeLancey, who also administered the Holy Communion, 
assisted by the rector and others of the clergy. A large congregation, 
including many friends from Canada and other parts, deeply interested 
in the progress of the church, and warmly attached to the rector of 
the parish, attended these services. 

A correspondent of the " Buffalo Christian Advocate," Methodist, in 
a communication to that paper, remarked " that it was pleasant to see 
so many of Christ's Apostles and God's ministering servants in white 
robes." The correspondent further said " that the weather was very 
unfavorable, still there was a large attendance of attentive and devout 



68 History of St. Paul's Church. 

listeners. The bishop's sermoa was a masterly production, worthy of 
the man and the occasion ; lucidly setting forth the characteristics of 
God's house, being made up of prayer, praise, instruction, vows, grace 
received in answer to our faithful attendance and worship, from the God 
of Zion, who is always present, and dwelleth in the temples dedicated 
to His service.'' The correspondent also said : " The house is a mag- 
nificent edifice, superior in the architectural skill manifested in the plan 
and construction, beautifully finished and tastefully ornamented, by far 
the finest church edifice in the State out of the city of New York."* 

The following description of the new church edifice was published 
in 1850 in the "Gospel Messenger," and signed "C. W. H." 

. . . . " It is from the designs of Mr. Upjohn, in the First- 
pointed or Early English style, and exhibits in its different parts every 
variety of that style. The material is a brown sandstone, quarried 
near Buffalo. The ground plan of the church consists of a nave 105 
feet by 30, aisles 871^ by 16, chancel 26 by 24, chapel on the north, 
50 by 28, vestry 12 by 14, north-east and north-west porches, and west 
tower. ( It will be borne in mind that the chancel, which fronts Main 
Street, is at the east end.) The extreme length of the church, exter- 
nally, including the tower, nave, and chancel, is about 140 feet ; and 
the extreme breadth, including the nave, aisles and chapel, about 95 
feet. The ground plan of the church, as much as any feature of it, 
displays the consummate genius of the architect — for there were no 
ordinary difficulties to overcome. A church of very large size was 
required ; it must occupy nearly the whole of a triangular lot ; and 
orientation was to be secured, if possible. All these objects'have been 
accomplished in the plan of the church, and without any sacrifice of 
beauty or convenience. 

" The principal entrance is at the west end of the nave, by sliding 
doprs, richly carved with the intersecting Norman arches, which mark 

* The main part only of the church was finished at this time ; the stone steps, 
porches and towers were added later. The spire of the main tower was not finished 
until 1870, and that of the smaller tower until 1871. 



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History of St. Paul's Church. 69 

the origin of pointed architecture. From this point is obtained the 
finest view of the interior — looking down the long vista of the nave 
and chancel to the east window at the opposite extremity, a distance 
of 130 feet. The piers which divide the nave into six bays, are of 
wood, 2 feet 6 inches in diameter, and of a very fine design, — a 
square shaft surrounded by eight small columns, alternated with 
deep recess moldings. The capitals, in their deep hollows and bold 
projections, display that marked contrast of light and shadow so 
characteristic of early English architecture. The roof is of a later 
period than the rest of the church, and is a fine specimen of the 
noble, open-timber roofs of the fourteenth century. The arches of 
the nave roof spring from hammer-beams resting upon braces which 
spring from the vaulting shafts above the piers. Above the vault- 
ing shafts are tie-beams extending across to the wall plate of the 
aisles, and similar tie-beams extend between the piers, thus form- 
ing triforia, open underneath, and the sides filled with geometrical 
tracery. The tie-beams again are separated by arches springing 
from the capitals of the piers. The arches of the nave roof are 18 
feet in span, and 60 feet from the floor to their apex. The spandrels 
of all the arches are filled with rich tracery, in which the trefoil and 
cuspings, characteristic of the transition to middle-pointed architec- 
ture, are very prominent. The piers and arches are painted a dark 
brown color, harmonizing perfectly with the exterior of the church, 
but not in imitation of stone. The roof of the nave is a very rich 
ultramarine blue. 

" The nave projects at the west end one bay beyond the aisles, and 
the north aisle one bay beyond the chapel. At the west end of each 
aisle are doors similar to the west doors of the nave, but smaller.* 
The aisle windows are all lancets, two in each bay, ten feet from the 
floor, and 18 feet in height, and connected by a double label mould- 
ing. They are filled with stained glass of a rich salmon color, in 
small diamond panes, each pane bearing di. fleur-de-lis. 

* These doors were walled up in 1864 ; see note at foot of page 100. 



JO History of St. Paul's Church. 

" The seats of the nave and aisles are all open, the ends about 3 
feet 6 inches high, and ^Yi inches in thickness, pointed and carved 
with rich tracery. In the head is a cinque-foil, within which is the 
number of the seat in gold on a blue ground. The nave and aisles 
contain about 730 sittings ; the chapel 218 on the floor and 192 in the 
gallery, making in all about 1,140. The central alley of the nave is 
about six feet broad. 

" The chapel occupies the second, third and fourth bays of the north 
aisle, opening into it by three arches. It contains three ranges of seats 
like those of the nave, facing east. Its principal entrance is from a 
lofty porch on the east, beyond which is a passage to the vestry, and 
also to the small tower containing the circular staircase to the gallery. 
This gallery occupies all the upper part of the chapel, and is reached 
by a passage in the second story of the porch, which opens into the 
north aisle by two arches separated by a small square piece of stone.* 

" The organ (a powerful and fine-toned instrument from the manu- 
factory of House & Co., Buffalo, containing 30 stops) is placed over 
the vestry, at the east end of the north aisle, and in front of it is a 
space raised one step and enclosed, for the singers. Near this is the 
font, of white marble, and octagonal in shape, the alternate panels of 
the basin sculptured with the Alpha and Omega, the Dove, etc. The 
pulpit is placed outside the chancel arch on the south, and is entered 
by steps from the chancel. It is of black walnut, octagonal, sup- 
ported by a central shaft with open, spandreled arches. 

" The chancel opens into the nave by a fine archway of cut stone, 
40 feet in height, 20 feet in span, and 2 feet 6 inches in thickness. 
The sides of the arch are enriched with small clustered shafts, the 
space between them deeply recessed. The chancel is divided by the 

* This gallery over the chapel was afterwards, in 1857, removed. In the illustra- 
tion given later in this volume, of the interior of the ruins of the east end of the church, 
after the fire of 1888, the line of the flooring of this gallery is plainly visible, as is also 
the old doorway leading from the gallery to the tower staircase, and which was closed 
up and covered with plaster when the gallery was removed, — the intense heat of the 
fire having peeled off the fresco and exposed the old wall. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 71 

altar-rail into choir, or outer chancel, and sacrarium. The floor of the 
choir is elevated three steps above the nave, and the sacrarium one 
step above the choir. The lectern is on the second step of the choir, 
on the north side, directly under the chancel arch, and is of a very 
beautiful design — a square central shaft, within four small columns, 
with foliated capitals, upon which rest the brackets supporting the 
book- board. 

" I may remark here that all the furniture of the church is of black 
.walnut, unpainted. On the north side of the choir are two stalls, and 
on the south three, all alike and plain, with high ends and shoulders. 
In front of the stalls are solid desks with kneelers, the fronts paneled 
with pointed arches, and the book-boards resting on brackets. The 
altar-rail is of black walnut, supported by eight small spiral shafts of 
metal gilt, the heads branching out into foliage. The sedilia on the 
south side of the sacrarium are three in number, the ends very high 
and terminating in richly carved fleur-de-lis. The altar stands on a 
foot-pace, 7 feet by 14, under the east window, and some two feet 
from the wall. The table is a single .slab of black walnut 8 feet by 4, 
and 3 inches thick, supported by slender shafts with open arches, 
pointed and cusped. It is a very fine piece of work. On the south 
side of the chancel are two lancet windows, similar to those of the 
aisles, but filled with glass of deeper and richer hues. The east 
window is a very fine triplet, the central light about 23 feet in height, 
and the side lights 18 feet. The central light is filled with circles and 
quatre-foils alternately, the latter each bearing a crimson cross, on 
the uppermost of which is a dove descending — on the next below, a 
lamb. The side lights are filled with other sacred emblems, — the 
crown, the chalice, etc. The whole effect of the stained glass is very 
fine ; there is none of that cold, gloomy air which so many of our new 
churches have, and which the coarse, gray glass in common use 
almost always produces. 

" Of the general effect of the exterior of the church we cannot 
speak with much certainty, as its finest feature, the great tower, is not 



72 History of St. Paul's Church. 

yet seen. . On the north of the chancel is a small circular 

tower, whose upper story contains the bell of the old church. This 
tower is connected with the chapel by a large closed porch. At the 
west end of the north porch is a smaller porch. 

"One marked feature of the exterior of the church is the simple 
and substantial character of the stone work. The walls are 2 feet 6 
inches in thickness, and the buttresses plain and heavy — those on the 
corners capped with lofty pinnacles. 

"The roof is slated — the slates laid diamond- wise — and has no 
pa<apet. Under the eaves of the nave runs a plain corbel -table, and 
the chancel has one of much richer design. The gable of the chancel 
is to be crowned by a large floriated cross, and each gable of the nave 
by a smaller one. 

" The finest view of the exterior is from the northeast, at the corner 
of Main and North Division streets. From this point are seen, finely 
grouped, the gables of the chapel, nave and chancel, with the lofty 
north-east porch, and the quaint little round tower at its corner." .... 

The sale of the pews in the new church edifice was by public 
auction, in the church, on Thursday morning, October 23, 1851, con- 
ditioned that they should be subject to such annual tax on their 
valuation as the vestry should determine to be proper for the mainte- 
nance of public worship in said edifice, and to defray the contingent 
and other expenses of the parish. 

The vestry met at the rectory on Saturday evening, October 25, 
185 1, and the building committee, with Mr. Upjohn the architect, met 
with them. There had been a misunderstanding with the architect 
relative to the stained-glass windows, both as to price and workman- 
ship. The vestry were also dissatisfied with the great increase of the 
cost of the edifice over and above the $52,372 it was estimated to 
cost before the commencement of the work. Mr. Upjohn had cer- 
tainly not guaranteed that it would not cost more than that sum, and 
had made his estimates on the different estimates furnished to him in 
Buffalo for the different portions of the edifice. He had contracted 



History of St. Paul's Church. 73 

that the stained- glass windows should be placed in the church for 
$1,800, and he agreed in writing at this meeting that the said windows 
should be made satisfactory to the vestry. He also agreed in writing 
that as the entire cost of the edifice would now be $85,000, yet his five 
percent, commissions on the said cost should not exceed five per cent, 
on the $52,372 as originally estimated, all of which was satisfactory and 
agreed to by the vestry. 

At a meeting of the vestry on Monday evening, October 27, 185 1, 
the treasurer reported that the church edifice had cost, up to that time, 
$54,581.80, and that he had received from all sources $52,969.95, leav- 
ing a balance of $1,611.85 due to the treasurer. 

The following extracts are from the text of the first sermon preached 
by Dr. Shelton in the new church edifice, November 2, 185 1, directly 
after his return from Europe. It was printed at the time by request 
of a committee of the congregation, and is a sermon of remarkable 
power and beauty ; it is also interesting as giving a rdsum^ of the 
building of the church, and as "marking an important era in the his- 
tory of the church and parish." The text is from I. Kings, Chapter 
IX. 3, "I have heard thy prayer, and thy supplication that thou hast 
made before me : I have hallowed this house which thou hast built, to 
put my name there forever : and mine eyes and mine heart shall be 
there perpetually.'' 

" After so long a separation, and so many scenes of varied interest 
which have transpired since upon this plot of ground, we parted with 
the house of worship which had been hallowed in the eyes of God, as 
in our own hearts, we have cause for gratitude that we are permitted 
(in the Providence of the Almighty Being who presides over the affairs 
of mortals) to re-assemble under circumstances so auspicious. We 
conceived, some three years since, the design of parting with an old 
and time-honored edifice, which had answered its object, and, for us, 
fulfilled its mission; and of placing on the same unrivaled spot a more 
noble and fitting edifice, one which should give dignity and all that 
architectural beauty could confer upon a house devoted to the wor- 



74 History of St. Paul's Church. 

ship and service of Almighty God. This design has been accomplished. 
We have seen it proceed from step to step, from day to day, from month 
to month, and from year to year ; after the incipient thought, the notes 
of preparation ; then the commencement, the demolition of nature's or^ 
naments and the breaking away of ancient bounds ; then the. removal 
of the edifice in which so many associations centered, in which for so 
many years our prayers and rites of religion have been offered and per^ 
.formed ; then the laying, deep and solid, far beneath the surface, the 
foundation stones, upon which have been reared so successfully, so 
prosperously — and without accident — these lofty and imposing walls ; 
from which has sprung this azure arch, supported by these massive 
columns, illuminated by these beautiful windows. During all this, long 
period, and through all its exposures (by God's blessing) an accident 
fatal to life or limb has not occurred ; more than this, scarcely an im- 
pediment to a steady right onward movement has been presented. 
Neither discord nor disagreement, neither envy nor jealousy, none of 
the bad passions of the heart, have been allowed to have an entrance in 
any breast ; but unity of purpose, unity of design, harmony and peace 
have always been present ; if a momentary misunderstanding resulting 
from misapprehension has arisen, it has fled away before sounder and 
holier thoughts, and a just appreciation of the right intent and good 

will of all parties Judging of acts by their consequences 

and results it is safe to say of the generality of those who have given 
their treasure, their time, their attention, their prayers, to the erection 
of this glorious edifice, it is their best act in life ; for there has been 
reared under your auspices, one of the most costly, most fit, and most 
beautiful Temples of God which can be seen anywhere in the wide 
extent of this fair land. Rarely has it been surpassed. It does not 
vie in glorious majesty with those lofty and grand Cathedrals which are 
the ornament and pride of the Church of Britain ; it has not the cost 
nor the grandeur of the Temple of Solomon; with these it does not vie ; 
but it does vie with the churches of any land, however elegant and 
imposing they may be ; and when I reflect that from the generous and 



History of St. Paul's Church. 75 

open-handed liberality, the unselfish, the free-hearted and expansive 
churchman-like spirit of this comparatively small parish, all this cost 
has been derived, I cannot refrain from saying that it is a more noble 
monument, evincing those qualities, than can be found elsewhere in the 
country in which we dwell. All debt has been eschewed ; you have 
derived aid from but three persons who are not of your number 
— every obligation has been promptly and honestly met, by its pay- 
ment ' in the current money of the merchant.' No blot, no stain, 
rests upon your honor or your honesty ; the laborer has been deemed 

worthy of his hire The distinguished architect should 

not be allowed to pass unnoticed and unhonored. It is no common 
intellect that has conceived and perfected these beautiful proportions ! 
A refined, cultivated and religious taste has been here, giving to every 
object, to every part, to every line the impress of cultivated archi- 
tectural skill. The cost has far exceeded, nearly doubled, his design 
and our intent. It has been his infirmity, and we may pardon that 
infirmity in consideration of the surpassing beauty that he has achieved. 
. . . The enterprise has been blessed with efficient, competent 
and able artificers, and some of our number have performed what has 
not been paid for by other coin than that which is best — the reward of 
an approving conscience — and the luxurious feeling which the sordid 
and selfish cannot know, which springs up like a bubbling fountain 
in the hearts of those who love to do for others good, with no 
desire for other fee or reward. It was no trifling enterprise upon 
which we embarked, when the decision was made to do what has 
been effected. It was hazardous on account of the multiplicity of 
views which possess the minds of men. It always makes us tremu- 
lous when we unmoor a ship from her fastenings, and commit her to the 
keeping of the winds and waves. . . . Peacefully, trustfully, 

confidingly, the beginning was entered upon — in the same spirit it has 
been carried forward, and, thus far, completed ; and we give thanks to 
God that He has in this, as in all other things, prospered and blessed 
us. There remains another and distinct enterprise ; that which we 



76 History of St. Paul's Church. 

have completed affords all the desired or desirable room in which we 
may worship and serve God. That which remains is the more orna- 
mental work, which must be completed, else we shall have put our hand 
to the plow and looked back. . . I doubt not, however, the 

day will soon be present when all will be completed I 

would not over-value costly edifices in which to worship God ; but I 
would express the opinion that in the presence of such buildings there 
is a solemnity and reverence which increases devotion and elevates the 
heart ; which commands the respect of the vile ; which humbles the 
proud ; which dignifies religion, and inspires reverence in all. Who 
shall estimate the silent influences of this pile, for ages to come ? — for 
it is built for the future as well as the present. Who shall count the 
results upon the unnumbered, both of this age and of that which shall 
be when we are mouldering in yonder burying-places, and our spirits 
are with those departed ? Say not that stone and mortar and fair 
proportions can have no influence in inspiring religious dread or holy 
devotion ! If Jehovah condescended to descend to the details of the 
most costly and glorious of temples made with hands, it was that 
love and reverence might be awakened ; that religion might be pro- 
moted ; that worship might be more solemn and subdued 

We turn from the past, and look onward to the future. We can but 
ask : For what end have we reared an edifice at so much cost of treas- 
ure and of care, and labor and anxiety ? Is it not for the honor of 
God among 'men ? Is it not for the advantage of the religion in which 
we live — in which we are to die — and through which we are to be 
saved ? Surely it is. It is for our convenience in worshiping the great 
and eternal God, and in proclaiming His all glorious truth. It is 
that here, in His presence, we may perform all those rites and observ- 
ances of religion which He requires at our hands. We look forward to 
the time when, as year after year passes away, we shall continue to 
grow in grace and increase in strength, until that summons comes 
which shall bid us lay aside our mortality and exchange time for 
eternity. We look that this shall be the place in which the now unborn 



History of St. Paul's Church. JJ 

of generations shall be reborn, regenerated and grafted into the body 
of Christ's Church ; that here they shall, in later years, ratify and 
confirm their baptismal engagements, receive the Apostle's benediction, 
and the renewal of that grace which shall enable them to fight man- 
fully against the World, the Flesh and the Devil. We look that it shall 
be the place in which the solemnities of the marriage vow shall be 
most appropriately performed, and which shall give additional sanctity 
to that holy ordinance. We look that it shall be the place in which 
we, and those who come after us shall break the bread of life, and 
receive, through that act of faith, spiritual and heavenly food. . . . 
We look that here shall be the place in which the pure Gospel of the 
Son of God shall be taught ; where the Word of God shall be read, 
and its awful mysteries so far explained as the mind of man can 
fathom them ; where the sacraments shall be duly and fitly explained ; 
where the doctrines of the Gospel shall be so made manifest that an 
attentive ear may hear and understand. . . . We look that here 

the great truths of the Church shall ever be fearlessly and truthfully 
proclaimed ; that here the youthful mind, in its early reflections, shall 
imbibe the eternal truths which shall make it wise unto salvation. We 
look, therefore, that it shall be, as it is, none other than the portal and 
the gateway to Heaven — connecting two worlds ! — The House which 
God has hallowed, and in which He has put His name forever, and 
where His eyes and His Heart shall be perpetually." . 

The new church edifice was dressed with evergreens at Christmas, 
185 1, for the first time, and on all subsequent Christmas days. 

December 30, 185 1, the committee reported to the vestry that the 
unpaid debts on the church edifice, over and above the assets or taxes, 
amounted to $4,348.26. 

The vestry decided that the new organ put in the church by the 
subscribers to the organ fund, and which cost $2,500, was satisfactory, 
and it was accepted. It was reported to the vestry that the old organ 
in the former edifice had been sold for $600 to the Presbyterian 
Society in Fredonia, N. Y. 



78 History of St. Paul's Church. 



1852. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 12, 1852, being the 
first election in the new church edifice, George B. Webster and R. H. 
Hdywood were elected wardens, and Lester Brace, Elijah Ford, John 
L. Kimberly, Samuel D. Flagg, Edward S. Warren, Amos I. Mathews, 
Benjamin. Bradley and George E. Hayes, vestrymen. At a subsequent 
meeting of the vestry Charles W. Evans was reappointed clerk and Jacob 
A. Barker treasurer, and a committee was appointed to solicit subscrip- 
tions to pay $4,500 due on the church edifice, and $2,500 for the new 
organ, the subscription not to be binding unless the amount of $7,000 ' 
was subscribed. The vestry directed an assessment of eight per cent, 
on the valuation of the sold pews to pay the parish expenses from 
Easter, 1852, to Easter, 1853. 

1853- 

At a meeting of the vestry, Janilary 26, 1853, the committee reported 
that $7,000 had been subscribed by forty-five members of the congre- 
gation to pay, the $4,500 due on the church edifice, and $2,500 to pay 
for the new organ. 

At the annual election, March 28, 1853, the same vestry were 
reelected, ar^d at a subseqent meeting, April i, 1853, Charles W. Evans 
was reappointed clerk, and the salary of the rector was raised from $1,200 
to $1,700 per annum, and the rate of tax on the unsold pews was fixed 
at eight per cent. A committee was appointed to raise subscriptions 
for the purpose of completing the church edifice. 

On May 7, 1853, the vestry directed that water and gas be intro- 
duced into the rectory, at an expense of $331. 

After several temporary appointments William Channon was 
appointed sexton on June 30, 1853. At the same meeting Edward S. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 79 

Warren, from the music committee, reported that $1,000 would be 
required to defray the music expenses for the year commencing at 
Easter, 1853. At the same meeting the vestry ordered a tax of three 
and a half per cent, on the unsold pews to pay for paving Erie Street, 
amounting to $737.61. 

1854. 

January 4, 1854, the vestry appointed a committee to finish off the 
basement of the church edifice, and to construct a receiving vault for 
the dead in a part of the said basement. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 17, 1854, Russell 
H. Heywood and Lester Brace were elected wardens, and Elijah Ford, 
Henry Hagar, Albert H. Tracy, John S. Ganson, Israel T. Hatch, 
George E. Hayes, Benjamin Bradley and Amos I. Mathews, vestry- 
men. 

At a meeting of the vestry, April 20, 1854, Elijah Ford acted as 
clerk pro te?n, and Charles W. Evans was reappointed clerk, and was 
also appointed the treasurer of the parish. 

Albert H. Tracy having declined to act as vestryman, a meeting 
of the congregation was called, to meet at the church on May 22, 1854, 
to elect a vestryman in his place, and at the said meeting Charles W. 
Evans was elected to fill the vacancy. 

At a meeting' of the vestry on May 24, 1854, Charles W. Evans 
took his seat as vestryman, and signified his acceptance of the offices as 
clerk of the vestry and treasurer of the parish, to which he had been 
appointed on April 26, 1854. This was the first instance in this parish, 
and perhaps in any parish, where the same person held these three 
important offices at the same time. , 

It will be seen that George B. Webster was not elected warden this 
year. This was in consequence of his removal from his residence on 
Swan Street, where he had resided for more than twenty years, to his 
new residence on the corner of Delaware Avenue and Utica Street. 



8o History of St. Paul's Church. 

This last residence was so very distant from the rectory on Pearl 
Street as to almost entirely prevent him from attending the meetings 
of the vestry. He had been the warden of the parish from Easter 
Monday, 1823, to Easter Monday, 1854 — a period of thirty-one years. 
As junior warden, 1823 to 1826, and as senior warden, 1827 to 1854. 
He had also acted as treasurer of the parish and as a delegate to 
represent it in the Diocesan Convention. He served the parish with 
marked ability, both as warden and treasurer and as its representative 
in the Diocesan Convention, and also represented the Diocese of 
Western New York in the General Convention. When first elected 
warden he was only twenty-five years old. 

In May, 1854, forty-nine members of the congregation subscribed 
$19,490 to complete the church edifice, and the vestry determined to 
renew their efforts towards the completion thereof. 

August II, 1854, the committee appointed in January to construct 
a receiving vault for the dead, reported that it had been done, and the 
vault had been used on several occasions. The cost was $335.58, 
mostly paid by private subscription. 

1855- 

The same committee appointed at the same time to finish off the 
basement of the church for a Sunday-school room, reported to the 
vestry, April 5, 1855, that the work had been done, and that it had 
cost $1,243.49, including benches, chairs, book-cases, gas pipe and 
fixtures, a large stove, and including the stone steps and stone work 
leading from Pearl Street to the basement, of which $700 was paid 
from the proceeds of the young ladies' fair, held at Townsend Hall in 
February, 1854, and $643.59 from the building fund. At the same 
meeting of the vestry Charles W. Evans, as treasurer, in a written 
communication stated that he had made a full examination of the 
accounts of the building committee from 1849 to 1854, and also all 



History of St. Paul's Church. 8i 

other accoynts relative to the erection of the church edifice, and had so 
combined and arranged the accounts that they showed a full statement 
of the cost of the edifice up to the time the building committee 
commenced the tower, and also showed from what sources the money 
so expended was obtained, and such other information as would be 
useful for future reference. The vestry directed the statement to 
be copied in full in the vestry book. All the statements occupy 
eighteen pages in the said book. 

According to these statements the church edifice, up to this time, 
had cost $68,300.41, exclusive of the tower, including the furnaces, 
stoves, carpets, chancel furniture and fixtures, finishing off of the base- 
ment for the Sunday School and the receiving vault, interest on the loan 
certificates, commissions to the architect, gas pipes and fixtures, and 
including $2,500 for the new organ. The treasurer made his annual 
report to the vestry, on April 9, 1855, of the receipts and disbursements 
for the parish account. The receipts were $4,080.28 and the disburse- 
ments $4,039.53. The tax for pew rents was eight per cent, on the 
assessed valuation. The valuation of the pews sold being $42,625, of 
which $41,800 is available for revenue on taxation for pew rents. 

April 5, 1855, John L. Kimberly and Jacob A. Barker, composing 
the new building committee for building the porches, stone steps and 
the main tower, reported to the vestry that they had received in sub- 
scriptions $9,781.19, and had disbursed $9,501.86. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 9, 1855, Russell 
H. Heywood and Lester Brace were elected wardens, and Elijah Ford, 
Charles W. Evans, John Pease, John S. Ganson, Samuel G. Cornell, 
Henry K. Viele, George E. Hayes and John T. Lacy, vestrymen. At 
a subsequent meeting of the vestry Charles W. Evans was reappointed 
clerk of the vestry and treasurer of the parish. 

At a meeting of the vestry on October 23, 1855, the treasurer 
reported that he had sold to the Rev. Dr. Shelton the five shares of 
stock of the Wells & Fargo California Express Company, which had 
been received from Amasa Mason on account of his subscription to the 



82 History of St. Paul's Church. 

church tower, for $400, being $80 per share, which was moi^^ than any 
other person had offered for it, and that he had paid the money over to 
the building committee.* At this meeting the rector reported that 
he had obtained additional subscriptions from fourteen members of 
the congregation amounting to $2,350, to complete the church tower. 

At the same meeting the rector mentioned to the vestry that some 
time before he had received a small contribution for a hospital fund 
from an individual, who did not desire to be mentioned by name, and 
that recently he had received from the same person another small sum 
for the same object, and that the two contributions with interest 
thereon now amounted to $44, and that he had deposited it in the Erie 
County Savings Bank. It is well worthy of record that this sum was 
the origin, or rather the conception, of the Church Charity Foundation 
in Buffalo, although the society itself was not organized until some 
time afterwards. 

The contribution was from the wife of Henry E. Howard ; Mr. 
Howard was connected with the Marine Bank in Buffalo. 

At a meeting of the vestry, December 4, 1855, the building com- 
mittee reported that they had disbursed $11,056.17 since April 5th, 
and that there was sufficient amount of stone on hand to complete 
the whole work, and recommended that the materials be prepared in 
the winter to recommence work in the spring. The vestry agreed to 
the recommendation. At a meeting of the vestry on March 13, 
1855, the plan was mentioned of removing the organ from its position 
near the chancel to a gallery to be erected in the westerly end of the 
church. 

* This purchase of stock, made by Dr. Shelton largely to oblige the vestry and 
his friend, Mr. Mason, who had become financially embarrassed and felt unable to 
pay his subscription to the building fund in cash, was the nucleus of the considerable 
fortune which he left at the time of his death. His ownership of this stock brought 
him into contact with the late William G. Fargo, through whose friendly advice Dr. 
Shelton made some small additional investments in the stocks of the Wells-Fargo and 
American Express Companies. In after years these stocks increased very greatly in 
value, and formed the bulk of his personal property at his death, in 1883. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 83 

1856. 

March 24, 1856, the treasurer reported the receipts for parish 
expenses for the year past to be $5,232.60, including the ten per cent, 
pew tax on the assessed valuation, and the disbursements were 
$5,198.92, the rector's salary being $1,700 per annum. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, March 24, 1856, Russell 
H. Heywood and Lester Brace were elected wardens, and Elijah Ford, 
Charles W. Evans, John Pease, John S. Ganson, Samuel G. Cornell, 
Henry K. Viele, George E. Hayes, DeWitt C. Weed, vestrymen ; and at 
a subsequent meeting of the vestry Charles W. Evans was re-appointed 
clerk and also treasurer of the parish, and John L. Kimberly and 
Jacob A. Barker were continued in the building committee, and they 
were requested to remove the partition between the chapel and the 
main edifice. It had originally been arranged to shut off the chapel 
in order to have services in it separate from the main edifice. 

April 3, 1856, the committee on music was requested to report the 
probable expense of removing the organ to a gallery in the west end 
of the church, and to construct pews in the space then occupied by the 
choir, and the ways and means of paying the cost of the proposed 
improvement. 

At the same meeting the vestry raised the salary of the rector to 
$2,000 per annum, with the use of the rectory. 

April 24, 1856, the music committee reported that the expense of 
building an organ loft in the west end of the church would be about 
$600, and that three large and two small pews could be built in the 
present choir space in front of the organ, and that it would cost $500 
to remove and set up the organ in the proposed loft, and that an imita- 
tion organ or stained glass window could be placed in the space then 
occupied by the organ. 

The vestry resolved to raise by subscription $10,000 to finish the 
main tower and spire and the small tower and turrets, and to point 
the stone work. 



84 History of St. Paul's Church. 

July 29, 1856, Rev. Dr. Shelton reported that he had obtained cash 
subscriptions to the amount of $6,600 towards finishing the church 
edifice. 

1857- 

January 16, 1857, the vestry agreed that an organ gallery be con- 
structed in the west end of the church, and the organ be removed 
thereto, provided it could be done without any expense to the parish. 

March 6, 1857, the committee was directed to confer with Mr. 
Upjohn relative to the moving of the organ. 

March 20, 1857, Mr. Hey wood, as senior warden, reported that Mr. 
Upjohn, the architect, was opposed to the removal of the organ as be- 
ing injurious to the effect of the church. He also reported that Mr. 
Upjohn was of the opinion that the removal of the gallery over the 
chapel would be a decided improvement to the appearance of the 
church. 

April 7, 1857, the vestry passed resolutions relative to the death of 
George B. Webster, who had been the senior warden of the parish for 
thirty-one years prior to 1854. Mr. Webster died April 4, 1854. 

" It having pleased the All-wise Disposer of the events of life to 
remove from us our respected and highly-valued friend, George B. 
Webster, Esq., who served the parish as its Senior Warden from the 
year 1823 to 1854, a period of thirty-one years, and had the super- 
vision of its finances for nineteen years, previous to 1841, and was one 
of the Building Committee in the erection of the present church 
edifice, rendering on all occasions disinterested and most efficient 
services — We, the Rector, Wardens and Vestrymen, do resolve, that 
we esteem his zeal for the best interests of religion to be worthy of our 
emulation ; that his attachment to the Church, her institutions, sacra- 
ments and appointments, and his steady adhesion to principle have 
secured our lasting esteem and respect. . . . Resolved, That the 
above resolutions be placed upon the Records of the Parish." . 




REDUCED FACSIMILE OF THE LITHOGRAPHED PLAN OF THE CHURCH IN 1851. 
With the names uf pew holders at Easter, 1857. 
With notes and additions by G. H. B, 
(See pages 68 to 72, 100, 268, 275 ) 



History of St. Paul's Church. 85 

April 13, 1857, the treasurer read his annual report to the vestry. 
The receipts were $4,688.39, including the ten per cent, pew tax on the 
valuation of the sold pews, and the disbursements were $4,685.16. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 13, 1857, Rus- 
sell H. Heywood and Lester Brace were elected wardens, and Elijah 
Ford, John S. Ganson, Henry K. Viele, DeWitt C. Weed, John 
Pease, Charles W. Evans, Samuel G. Cornell and George E. Hayes, 
vestrymen. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry Charles W. Evans was 
reappointed clerk and also treasurer of the parish. 

May 4, 1857, the vestry directed that the tower room in the tower 
be finished off and furnished as a committee room or for other meet- 
ings, or Sunday School purposes. It was accordingly fitted up, and 
often used by bridal parties preparatory to their procession to the 
chancel to have the marriage ceremony performed. The expense was 
$208.08. June I, 1857, Ralph Williams was appointed sexton in place 
of William Channon. 

July 6, 1857, the building committee reported that since their 
report on December 4, 1855, they had received and expended $8,872.17, 
making the total amount received and expended since their reappoint- 
ment in May, 1854, to be $29,438.20 ; they also reported that the 
church owned fifty-two cords of stone, paid for, then on the banks of 
the Erie Canal at Hulberton, N. Y.; that it would cost $5 per ton to 
land the same in Buffalo, and that it was estimated that $7,567 would 
complete the spire of the church. The vestry directed that the stone 
at Hulberton be brought to Buffalo. 

August 14, 1857, the Chime Fund Association of the parish 
reported to the vestry that the chime of bells had been fully com- 
pleted and placed in the tower, and that the association transferred them 
to the parish, conditional that the vestry appropriate $100 annually, 
if necessary, to keep them in order and to pay for ringing and chiming 
them. The vestry accordingly did so.* 

* Note. — For description of the bells, see Appendix. 



86 History of St. Paul's Church. 

September 14, 1857, the vestry directed a stone sidewalk six feet 
wide to be laid in front of the church on Erie Street. They also 
directed the gallery over the chapel and next to Pearl Street to be 
taken down, and it was accordingly removed. 

1858. 

April 5, 1858, the treasurer made his annual report to the vestry, 
showing the receipts from pew taxes at ten per cent, on the valuation of 
the sold pews, and from other sources, to be $5,067.41, and the dis- 
bursements $5,056.18. The rector's salary was $2,000 per annum. 
The treasurer reported that $28,000 had been collected for parish 
expenses since the occupancy of the new church edifice, being for 
seven and a half years, and that during the preceding nine years 
$97,500 had been expended on the construction of the church edifice, 
which amount, including the $28,000 for parish expenses, had been col- 
lected without any expense to the parish. He also reported that the 
floating debt of the parish was $222.17 over and above the resources, 
and that the funded debt was $4,215.67, of which $3,500 was for the 
mortgage on the rectory. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 5, 1858, Russell 
H. Heywood and Lester Brace were elected wardens, and John S. 
Ganson, William H. Walker, Asher P. Nichols, Hunting S. Chamber- 
Iain, John T. Lacy, John D. Shepard, Dr. Thomas F. Rochester and 
Walter Joy, vestrymen. 

At this election there was quite an organized opposition to most of 
the last vestry, in consequence of their unwillingness to remove the 
organ. 

The new vestry appointed William Sutton clerk, and DeWitt C. 
Weed treasurer. The treasurer was authorized to expend $100 per 
annum for collecting the pew taxes and rents. 

On May 12, 1858, the vestry appointed a committee to build a new 
fence around the church edifice. 



History of St. Paul's Church. S7 

1859- 

April 20, 1859, the Committee reported that the iron fence around 
the church edifice was finished and had cost $1,817.14. 

At the annual election, April 25, 1859, the same vestry were 
reelected, and John T. Lacy was appointed clerk, and DeWitt C. Weed 
treasurer, and the pew tax was raised from ten to eleven per cent, on 
the valuation of the pews. 

On June 2, 1859, Jacob A. Barker died, aged sixty-six years. He 
was one of the oldest residents of the city, and was present at the 
burning of Buffalo in 1813, at which time he was taken prisoner by the 
British. 

June 3, 1859, the vestry adopted resolutions on the death of Jacob A. 
Barker, stating that " he might be called the father of the parish. 
A resident in Buffalo many years before its organization, he was its 
active supporter and unswerving friend from its foundation to the hour 
of his death. Elected a member of its vestry on Easter Monday, 1823, 
he gave untiring and devoted service to the church in official relations, 
with the exception of rare intervals, for a period of nearly thirty-six 
years. Witnessing its feeble beginning and early struggles, he was 
also the witness of its late progress, and he lived to rejoice in its full- 
ness of strength and maturity. When, in the course of time, the parish 
resolved to erect a nobler edifice for the worship of Almighty God 
and the honor of the Church, no son of hers threw his heart and ser- 
vices into the project with greater alacrity or warmer zeal. He gave 
his time, his means, and his prayers, day by day, almost ; he watched 
with affectionate regard its growth from simple outline to full comple- 
tion, and he lived to pay reverent and devout worship in the temple which 
he had labored so zealously to rear. In private life he was endeared to 
all who knew him — his courteous manner, his kindness of disposition 
and his natural unaffected dignity of character commanded respect and 
won affection ; his mind was strong, his life was pure." 



88 History of St. Paul's Church. 

July 19, 1859, the wardens were appointed a committee to wait upon 
those members of the congregation who were understood to be opposed 
to the removal of the organ, and to say to them that the large majority 
of the vestry considered that step to be demanded by the best interest 
of the parish, and to endeavor to induce them to withdraw their oppo- 
sition to the removal. The committee reported to the vestry, on July 
27th, that a number of persons had been called on, and were strongly 
opposed to its being removed, some of them intimating that in the 
event of its removal they would leave the parish. According to the 
minutes of the vestry it was stated that Mr. Evans wished to make a 
proposition in regard to the music, whereupon the subject was post- 
poned for the purpose of giving him an opportunity to make his propo- 
sition in form. The vestry met July 29, 1859, and the proposition was 
presented to the vestry in writing, signed by John L. Kimberly, Charles 
W. Evans, Carlos Cobb, Jabez B. Bull, John Pease and A. P. Thomp- 
son, stating that a general participation by the congregation in the 
singing of the psalms and hymns would be a result most desirable, 
and in the then state of feeling in the parish that it would be better to 
try such an experiment rather than resort to any extreme measure, and 
that, as a conciliatory measure, the organ, for the time being, should 
remain in its then location, and some suitable person should be 
engaged as leader, who, together with the organist, should conduct 
and lead the music. It was proposed that if the vestry agreed to the 
proposition, that the signers would agree to defray the expenses 
attending thereon, not exceeding $200, up to Easter, i860. The 
vestry accepted the proposition. On April 9, i86o, the vestry returned 
thanks to Horace F. Kenyon and John G. Woehnert for their voluntary 
aid and assistance in singing in the choir for the past six months 

i860. 

At the annual election, April 9, i860, R. H. Heywood and Lester 
Brace were elected wardens, and William H. Walker, John T. Lacy, 



■M*.- .Ji,i;»»,i-iW.>^.'Wiui!',-»,>"»uwiii,',> 




THE REVEREND DOCTOR SHELTON. 
From a photograph taken about the early 'do's. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 89 

Walter Joy, A. Porter Thompson, Charles W. Evans, Edward M. 
Atwater, Erastus B. Seymour and Dr. Cornelius C. Wyckoff, vestrymen. 
John T. Lacy was reappointed clerk, and DeWitt C. Weed treasurer. 
The rate of tax on the pews was fixed at eleven per cent, on their 
valuation. 

1861. 

In March, i86i, the vestry sold to Thomas McGuire the stone 
quarry owned by the parish, near Hulberton, Orleans County, on the 
Erie Canal, on condition that he deliver in Buffalo thirty-six and a half 
cords of stone by September, 1861. 

At the annual election, April i, t86i, R. H. Heywood and Lester 
Brace were elected wardens, and Walter Joy, John S. Ganson, Erastus 
B. Seymour, Carlos Cobb, William H. Walker, Edward M. Atwater, 
Asher P. Nichols and Charles W. Evans, vestrymen ; John B. Eaton 
was appointed clerk, and DeWitt C. Weed treasurer. The Rev. Mr. 
Lynn assisted the Rev. Dr. Shelton in i86i. 

1862. 

At the annual election, April 21, 1862, R. H. Heywood and Lester 
Brace were elected wardens, and Erastus B. Seymour, Charles W. 
Evans, Asher P. Nichols, William H. Walker, Walter Joy, John S. 
Ganson, Edward M. Atwater and Seth H. Grosvenor, vestrymen. John 
B. Eaton was appointed clerk, and DeWitt C. Weed treasurer. 

September 26, 1862, John B. Eaton having resigned as clerk, John 
B. Seymour was appointed in his place. At the same time |i,ooo was 
appropriated by the vestry to enable the Rev. Dr. Shelton to appoint the 
Rev. Dr. Eigenbrodt of New York as his assistant. 

December i, 1862, Dr. Shelton stated to the vestry that the Rev. 
Dr. Eigenbrodt having declined, he nominated the Rev. Dr. Thomas C. 
Pitkin as his assistant, and said that his health was such that he must 
for the present entirely relinquish all parochial labor, and that it was 



go History of St. Paul's Church. 

necessary he should have an assistant, and that he had every confidence 
in the ability and excellence of character of Dr. Pitkin. The vestry 
cordially accepted the nomination and voted $2,000 per annum as the 
compensation of Dr. Pitkin, and appointed a committee to obtain sub- 
scriptions from the congregation to aid in paying the same. 

1863.* 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 6, 1863, Lester Brace 
and Charles W. Evans were elected wardens, and Erastus B. Seymour, 
Asher P. Nichols, DeWitt C. Weed', Samuel G. Cornell, William H. 
Walker, Walter Joy, Seth H. Grosvenor and Lauren C. Woodruff, ves- 
trymen •; Mr. Evans was elected Warden in place of R. H. Heywood, 
in consequence of Mr. Heywood's necessarily frequent absence from 
the city ; John B. Seymour was appointed clerk, and DeWitt C. Weed 
treasurer. 

At the vestry meeting, April 9th, the Rev. Dr. Pitkin signified his 
acceptance of his appointment as assistant minister. 

May 22, 1863, the vestry was called together to adopt resolutions 
on the death of Edward S. Warren. Dr. Shelton remarked that the 
parish had lost one of its most liberal supporters, and he himself one 

* During the trying years of the Civil War St. Paul's parish did its share of the 
work for the relief of our soldiers. 

Societies were formed in many of the Episcopal churches for sending supplies 
through the Sanitary Commission. The Presbyterian and other churches usually sent 
through the " Christian Commission." 

Mrs. Elizabeth Staats Seymour, of St. Paul's, was for a long time local president 
of the Sanitary Commission, and was the life of the work in Buffalo. 

Mrs. John Pease, Mrs. Frank Demarest, Miss Harriet Hayes (now Mrs. 
Charles H. Smith, wife of the rector of St. James's) and other women of St. Paul's 
parish worked at the Aid Rooms of the Sanitary Commission in cutting out garments 
to be given to various parish societies to make up for the soldiers. The work also 
consisted in receiving donations, giving out work, packing boxes and barrels, and 
sending them to the army, and in assisting disabled soldiers. A Soldiers' Home was 
also established temporarily in Buffalo during the latter part of the War. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 91 

of his warmest personal friends. The vestry commemorated his mem- 
ory in that " he loved everything associated with the parish and its pros- 
perity, always its staunch supporter and for many years an active and 
useful member of the vestry. In the erection of the church edifice he 
was a zealous and constant participant, and he looked forward with 
a swelling heart to the joyous day when, all her towers completed and 
every pinnacle set, the whole pile would command the tribute of love 
from every parishioner and the admiration of every churchman; but 
that pleasure was denied him — his sun of life went down before that 
happy consummation." 

Edward Stevens Warren was born at Middlebury, Vermont, May 16, 
1814, and graduated at Middlebury College in 1833 ; he came to Buf- 
falo early in 1834, and was admitted to the bar in 1837. In 1839 he 
married Agnes L., second daughter of Sheldon Thompson. He died 
after a very brief illness. May 20, 1863. He was one of the vestry of 
St. Paul's in 1842, and again from 1850 to 1853. 

At a meeting of the vestry, September 7, 1863, the Rev. Dr. Shelton 
again adverted to his ill-health, and said that on the nth of September 
he would be sixty-five, and had been the rector for thirty-four years. 
He said he was distressed to be compelled to say that he felt the hand on 
him which was ere long to take him from the responsibilities and duties 
as from the distresses and pains of life. He was unable to go on ; his 
work was essentially finished. Henceforth, he must look for some one 
to fill his place, and named the Rev. Dr. Pitkin as being acceptable to 
himself and probably to the parish, and he had no doubt he would be 
willing to assume the duties of assistant rector. The vestry accord- 
ingly invited the Rev. Thomas Clapp Pitkin to accept the assistant 
rectorship of the parish, at an annual salary of $2,000, and the further 
sum of $500 for rent of a parsonage, to commence September i, 1863. 
Fourteen hundred and fifty dollars were subscribed by members of 
the congregation towards paying Rev. Dr. Pitkin's salary. 

It was reported to the vestry that the city had placed a gas light on 
Pearl Street, in front of the main entrance of the church. 



92 History of St. Paul's Church. 

At a meeting of the vestry, September 14, 1863, the Rev. Dr. 
Pitkin accepted the assistant rectorship of the parish. 

November 23, 1863, a committee, consisting of L. C. Woodruff, S. G. 
Cornell and C. W. Evans, was appointed to investigate the propriety of 
removing the organ. December 21, 1863, Messrs. Woodruff and Cornell, 
from the committee relative to the organ, made their report to the vestry 
stating that they had conversed with many of the congregation in order 
to ascertain the general sentiments of the parish, had taken the opinion 
of musical circles, and had procured an estimate of the expense with a 
proposition from competent parties to do the work ; that they believed 
the tones of the organ would be greatly improved and brought out in full 
volume were it placed in the gallery. They regarded its then position 
as injurious to the instrument and inconvenient of access for repairs. 
They believed that a great majority of the congregation desired the re- 
moval of the organ to the gallery, and their wishes should be respected ; 
and they therefore recommended its early removal to that position. 

Mr. Evans, from the same committee, made a minority report stat- 
ing that he was unable to agree with the majority of the committee ; 
that the organ was placed in the then position by universal consent in 
185 1, and no objections were made to its being there for five years 
afterwards ; that the question of its removal had been more or less 
agitated for six years, causing considerable feeling, that the vestry 
should not exercise any right it might have to remove it unless it could 
be shown that the removal was beneficial to the parish, not only from a 
pecuniary point of view but more especially in the proper administra- 
tion of the church services. Many recent writers on the subject 
assume that the position of a church organ should be where our organ 
then was. If the music is under the control of the rector, it should be 
in such a position that he can readily control it ; he could not so readily 
control it in the gallery. In its present position it faces the congrega- 
tion, and it being very natural to turn to the point from whence sound 
proceeds, there is no occasion for the people to turn from the chancel 
as we often see them do in those congregations where the organ is 



History of St. Paul's Church. 93 

in the gallery — a practice, though natural, yet very un-churchlike and 
which no doubt would become common if our music were generally 
located in the gallery. Many recently erected church edifices have 
their organs in the vicinity of the chancel. Both reports were accepted 
by the vestry, and ordered to be recorded in the minutes. The 
resolution was offered that it was expedient to remove the organ from 
its then location, and it was passed by a majority of two. A resolution 
was then offered that the organ be removed to the gallery or organ 
loft, provided that the recess where it then was should be properly 
closed, and the new pews be placed in their proper position, the whole 
to be done without expense to the parish. The resolution was passed, 
Mr. Evans alone voting in the negative. 

The vestry then appointed a committee to superintend the removal. 

The vestry met December 25, 1863, and passed resolutions on the 
occasion of the very sudden death of Walter Joy, who was one of the 
vestry in 1839, 1840, 1841 and 1842, and again from 1858 to 1863. 
He was born in 1810, and came to Buffalo with his father, Thaddeus 
Joy, in 1824. 

The committee reported to the vestry that fifty-one members of 
the congregation had paid $911 toward the expense of removing and 
fitting up the organ in the gallery. Forty dollars additional was sub- 
sequently received from other members. 

1864. 

The treasurer made his annual report at Easter, 1864, showing the 
receipt of $4,620.35 for pew rent, and $1,167.50 subscribed and paid 
towards the salary of the Rev. Dr. Pitkin. He estimated the 
expenses for the year ending Easter, 1865, to be $7,010. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, March 28, 1864, Lester 
Brace and Charles W. Evans were elected wardens, and Lauren C. 
Woodruff, Asher P. Nichols, William H. Walker, Samuel G. Cornell, 
Dr. Thomas F. Rochester, James W. Brown, Edwin Hurlbert and 



94 History of St. Paul's Church. 

George E. Hayes, vestrymen ; John B. Seymour was appointed clerk 
and Dewitt C. Weed treasurer. The rate of tax was fixed at thirteen 
per cent, on the valuation of the pews. One thousand dollars was 
appropriated to pay for the church music. 

The Rev. Dr. Shelton presided at all of the meetings of the vestry, 
prior to and including the meeting of March 30, 1864. 

The vestry met May 14, 1864, and passed resolutions on the occa- 
sion of the sudden death of Seth H. Grosvenor. 

In the resolutions it was stated that "in the faithfulness with which 
our departed friend discharged his duties as a member of the parish, 
as a vestryman and a communicant of the church, in his substantial 
worth and integrity of Christian character, in his readiness to promote 
all good works, and in his genial kindliness of disposition and the 
Christian couttesy of all his intercourse in society, we recognize an 
example worthy of imitation." 

Mr. Grosvenor was one of the vestry in 1862 and 1863, and was 
always a prominent member of the parish. He died very suddenly 
at his residence in Buffalo, May 13, 1864, aged 52 years. 

His wife, who, before her marriage, was Miss Jane Wey, was a 
niece of Mrs. Shelton, the wife of the rector ; she survives him, together 
with one son and three daughters, the eldest of whom is Mrs. William 
H. Glenny, Jr. The family have always been prominent members of 
St. Paul's, and most active and efficient in parish work. 

July 29, 1864, the vestry returned thanks to the Rev. William A. 
Matson for the voluntary and efficient aid given by him in the con- 
struction of the sounding board over the pulpit. 

The vestry met August 24, 1864. Dr. Shelton stated that his 
health had been greatly improved by his journey during the summer ; 
that he had been invited to visit Europe, and that he would be happy 
to accept, provided it was agreeable to the vestry. Whereupon, the 
vestry resolved that they should accord the leave of absence, and con- 
gratulated the rector upon the happy auspices under which the pro- 
posed journey was to be taken ; that they wished him a happy voyage, 



History of St. Paul's Church. 95 

and would pray for his safe return, with restored health, to the parish 
which held him in most affectionate regard.* 

The vestry met December 20, 1864, and adopted resolutions on the 
occasion of the death of Stephen Walker, one of the oldest members of 
the parish, a vestryman for twenty years, and for more than a quarter of 
a century superintendent of the Sunday School. The vestry resolved 
to place on record its high estimate of his moral and religious charac- 
ter, his honesty and faithfulness, his modest, cheerful piety, his practi- 
cal and Christian zeal, his unswerving devotion to the church, and his 
energy and practical perseverance in all good works. They recognized 
in the life and labors of the deceased an instance of the practical and 
efficient aid that can be afforded by the laymen of the church in 
furthering the cause of religion and sound Christian morals, and 
they recommended his example to imitation in the parish. They 
extended to the family of the deceased their heart-felt sympathy in 
the great loss they had sustained, and, while directing them to Him 
who can alone give consolation in their sorrow, they affectionately 
reminded them of the good name which he left behind as their most 
precious legacy. 

Stephen Walker died December 16, 1864, in the 71st year of his 
age. In an obituary notice published in one of the Buffalo papers it 



* Dr. Shelton sailed for the old world September 3, 1864, and September 21st, 
at the United States Legation in Paris, he united in marriage his kinsman Henry 
Shelton Sanford, United States Minister to Belgium, and Gertrude Ellen, daughter 
of John DuPuy, Esq., of Philadelphia. Mr. and Mrs. Sanford afterwards — in 
1870 — presented the first brass eagle lectern to St. Paul's Church. 

Leaving Paris, Dr. Shelton traveled through Italy, and in January, 1865, he 
visited the Nile; in March and April, he traveled through the Holy Land, making 
the entire route from Bairout to Joppa (Jaffa) on horseback. 

On his return to Buffalo, nearly every family in the parish found itself the 
recipient of some memento of the rector's travels — a circle of olive wood from the 
Mount, with the word "Jerusalem" in Hebrew characters, or a piece of polished 
marble marked " Pesten " — something to remind them of the scenes through which 
he had passed. 



96 History of St. Paul's Church. 

was stated that " Mr. Walker was brought up in the Society of Friends, 
and it was not until after his marriage that he became attached to the 
church. His intellect was of a very superior order, and he became 
thoroughly conversant with her hi.story and polity, and was able at all 
times to vindicate her claims. Removing to Utica, he was made a ves- 
tryman of Trinity Church, and Superintendent of the Sunday School. 
In 1832, Mr. Walker removed to Buffalo, and immediately becoming a 
member of St. Paul's parish, he remained in it until his death." Mr. 
Walker was superintendent of St. Paul's Sunday School from 1833, and 
was a member of the Vestry from 1837 to 1851, a period of fifteen years. 
Mrs. Walker, the wife of Stephen Walker, died February 8, 1868. 
They were the parents of the late Charles R. Walker, and of William H. 
Walker, now, and for many years past, one of the Wardens of St. Paul's 
and foremost in furthering the prosperity of the parish. 

1865. 

The vestry met April 6, 1865, and adopted resolutions on the occa- 
sion of the death of the Rt. Rev. William Heathcote De Lancey, Bishop 
of the Diocese of Western New York, as follows : 

" Whereas, it has pleased Almighty God in His wise providence, to 
take out of this world the soul of our beloved Diocesan, the Rt. Rev. 
William Heathcote De Lancey, D. D., LL. D., D. C. L., therefore : 

Resolved, That while we bow humbly to the Divine Will in this re- 
moval, we desire to place on record our appreciation of the character 
and example of the deceased as a Christian man and Bishop ; in his 
zeal, his singleness of purpose, his devotion to his work, his eminent 
discretion, his courtesy in all his intercourse with the clergy and the 
laity ; and our sense of the great loss sustained by the church, not 
only in this diocese, but throughout our land. 

Resolved, That to his wisdom in policy, prudence as well as energy 
in action, and single devotion to the church over which he presided. 




THE RIGHT REVERENO WILLIAM HEATHCOTE DeLANCEV, D. D., LL. D., D. C. L. (Oxon.). 

First Bishop of Western New York, 1S3Q-1865. Born, 1797 ; died, 1865. 



From the engraving by A H, Ritchie, 
published in 185,4. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 97 

we are mainly indebted, with the Divine blessing, for the unity, the 
harmony, the compact strength, and the intelligent churchmanship, 
which pre-eminently distinguish the Diocese of Western New York. 

Resolved, That in token of respect, and as a mark of sorrow, St. 
Paul's Church shall be draped in mourning, and that Messrs. Evans, 
Cornell and Weed be appointed a committee to attend the funeral." 

William Heathcote De Lancey, D. D., LL. D., D. C. L. (Oxon.), 
the first bishop of the Diocese of Western New York, was born at 
Mamaroneck, Westchester County, New York, October 8, 1797. He 
was graduated at Yale College in 1817, studied theology under the 
direction of Bishop Hobart, and received deacon's orders in 1819. 
Ordained to the priesthood in Trinity Church, New York, in 1822, he 
soon after became personal assistant to the venerable Bishop White of 
Philadelphia, in the three churches of which that prelate was rector. 
Upon the reorganization of the University of Pennsylvania in 1828, he 
was chosen provost of that institution, in which office he remained for 
five years, and then resumed the office of assistant minister of St. 
Peter's Church. In 1838 the Diocese of New York, comprising the 
whole State, was divided ; the eastern portion retaining the old name, 
and at the primary convention of the new Diocese, that of Western New 
York, held at Geneva, N. Y., November i, 1838, Dr. De Lancey was 
chosen its first bishop, and he was consecrated May 9, 1839, at Auburn, 
N. Y. He removed to Geneva, the seat of the Diocesan College, now 
called Hobart College, -which was chiefly indebted to his efficient efforts 
for its support. He also instituted a system of diocesan missions, by 
which a corps of laborers, unusually large in proportion to the population 
and wealth of the diocese, have been sustained without incurring debt. 

In an article contributed to the Utica Observer by the Rev. W. A. 
Matson, he says that : " Bishop De Lancey, as a scholar, a theologian, 
a profound thinker, an eloquent preacher, and an executive officer, had 
no superior on the bench of bishops of the American church. He 
won the clergy to him, not less by the admiration all felt for his wis- 
dom and talents, than for his affectionate and fatherly manner. Every 



98 History of St. Paul's Church. 

clergyman in the diocese felt that the bishop was his best friend. 
. . . . Under his care and supervision, the Diocese of Western 
New York acquired the title of ' The Model Diocese.' " 

Bishop De Lancey died at Geneva, N. Y., April 5, 1865, and was 
succeeded in the diocese by Bishop Coxe, who had been consecrated 
January 4, 1865, and had been assistant bishop of the diocese until 
Bishop De Lancey's death. 

The Right Rev. Arthur Cleveland Coxe, D. D., S. T. D., LL. D., 
Second Bishop of Western New York, was born in Morris County, 
N. J., May 10, 1818. In 1820 his parents removed to New York, 
where his boyhood and youth were passed. He was graduated with 
distinction, at the age of 20, from the University of the city of New 
York. He had already, at that time, become an author and a con- 
tributor to periodical literature. He was an adherent of the Epis- 
copal Church from childhood, under the influence of maternal rela- 
tives, and, after taking his first degree, he turned himself wholly to the 
service of the church. He was graduated in theology at the General 
Theological Seminary in St. Paul's Chapel, in 1841 ; was ordered 
Deacon, June 27, 1841, by Bishop B. T. Onderdonk, and ordained 
Priest, September 25, 1842, in St. j'ohn's Church, Hartford, Conn., by 
Bishop Brownell. He first took charge of St. Ann's Church, at Mor- 
risania, N. Y., where he remained until 1842, when he removed to Con- 
necticut, and was rector of St. John's Church, Hartford, until 1854 In 
1 85 1 he made an extensive European tour. He was rector of Grace 
Church, Baltimore, from 1854 to 1863; and of Calvary Church, New 
York city, from 1863 to 1865. In 1856 he was elected to the Episco- 
pate of Texas, but declined. He received the degree of D. D. from 
St. James' College, Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1856 ; that of S. T. D. 
from Trinity College, Hartford, in 1868, and that of LL. D from 
Kenyon College, Gambler, Ohio, in 1868. He was consecrated to the 
Episcopate in Trinity Church, Geneva, N. Y., January 4. 1865, by Bishops 
De Lancey of Western New York, Hopkins of Vermont, McCoscry 
of Michigan, Potter of New York, Odenheimer of New Jersey, and T'al- 




THE RIGHT REVEREND ARTHUR CLEVELAND COXE, D. D., S. T. D., LL. D. 
Second Bishop of Western New York, 1865-1896. Born, 1818 ; died, iSy6. 



From a photograph taken by Le Jeune 
Paris, in 1869, 



History of St. Paul's Church. 99 

bot of Indiana. Upon the death of Bishop De Lancey, in April, 1865, 
he became the second Bishop of the Diocese of Western New York. In 
1868-9 the diocese was divided, by setting off the counties east of 
Seneca Lake, as far as Herkimer County, and that territory was made 
the Diocese of Central New York. 

Bishop Coxe has the gift of eloquence to a remarkable degree, and 
an intense earnestness which carries conviction, and he usually preaches 
without notes. 

Notwithstanding his devoted labors in his different pastorates, and 
the engrossing duties of his Episcopal office, his life has been full of 
literary activity, and many valuable and scholarly books and pamphlets 
on ecclesiastical and kindred topics have appeared from time to time 
from his pen, and have been widely read, not only in America but in 
many European countries. 

As the " poet of devotion and the Church " he has won an 
acknowledged place. Especially appreciated are his " Christian 
Ballads," first published in 1845, and which since then have passed 
through many editions both here and abroad. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 17, 1865, the Rev. 
Dr. Pitkin presided as assistant rector, and Lester Brace and Charles W. 
Evans were elected wardens, and L. C. Woodruff, A. P. Nichols, William 
H. Walker, S. G. Cornell, G. S. Hazard, Dr. Thomas F. Rochester, 
Edwin Hurlbert and James W. Brown, vestrymen. At a subsequent 
meeting of the vestry, on April 20th, John B. Seymour was appointed 
clerk, and DeWitt C. Weed treasurer. It was resolved that a tax of 
twenty per cent, be levied on the pews to pay the parish expenses for 
the coming year. The vestry gave as the reason for the advance, that 
although the finances had been managed with great skill and rare fidelity, 
yet still the deficiency in the revenue existed in consequence of the 
largely increased expenses of the parish. It was at first thought that 
the effort would be made to raise the amount by subscription, but to 
that method very grave objections existed. If all would subscribe in 



loo History of St. Paul's Church. 

proportion to their ability there would be no difficulty, but the vestry 
found by experience that a large number of persons refused to con- 
tribute in that way, saying at the same time that they wished the tax 
put on the pews, and the vestry had decided to do so, believing that 
the fairness and equity of it would be acknowledged by all, and that 
the increased assessment would be cheerfully met by the congrega- 
tion. 

The treasurer made his annual report for the year ending at Easter, 
1865, showing the receipts for pew taxes $5,165.42; contributions to 
pay the assistant rector, $2,295 ; paid the rector and assistant rector 
$3,854.63 ; music, $1,096.19 ; other disbursements, $1,248.73. He 
estimated the parish expenses for the year ending Easter, 1866, to be 
$8,277.05, and if the tax was fixed at thirteen per cent, on the valuation 
of the pews, the deficiency would be $3,120.63. The vestry, however, 
directed the tax to be twenty per cent, on the $44,625.50 of the pews 
sold, and to rent the $13, 737. 50 of unsold pews, making a total valuation 
of the pews to be $58,363. The special fund from sales of pews and 
contributions amounted to $3,859.30. It was expended for the follow- 
ing purposes: Altering seats and doors, $761.54 ; cutting new doors, 
$231.95 ; painting, $109.26 ; making curtains, $264.35 ! three furnaces, 
$850 ; three stoves, $215.75 ; repairing roof of church, $710.75 ; 
making and repairing sewers, $149.76 ; other items, $354.91, and the 
balance, $311.03, was used for parish expenses. The item of $231.95 
for cutting new doors was for an alteration in the original plan, there 
being no doorways from the main vestibule to the entrance on Erie 
Street, or to the north aisle Pearl Street entrance, and to make these 
communications, the large doorways were cut out of the solid stone 
wall ; this was done in the year 1864.* 



* It will be noticed on examination of the original ground plan of the church that 
there were doorways at the west end of each of the side aisles. These doorways led 
from separate vestibules, the one at the end of the south aisle from the Erie Street 
vestibule, and that at the end of the north aisle from the smaller Pearl Street vestibule. 
The space, which was afterwards partitioned off and made into the main vestibule, 



History of St. Paul's Church. loi 

At a meeting of the vestry, July 25, 1865, the Rev. Dr. Pitkin, 
assistant rector, in the chair, it was ordered to be entered on the 
minutes that $20,104 had been subscribed by the churchmen of Buffalo 
to pay for the residence of the Bishop of Western New York — of which 
$6,750 had been subscribed by the parishioners of St. Paul's Church, 
$5,450 by Trinity, $4,733 by St. John's, $1,500 by Grace Church, $800 
by Ascension; $581 by St. Luke's, and $290 by St. James' Church, and 
that the committee had purchased the residence of Henry W. Rogers, 
on the south-west corner of Delaware Avenue and Tracy Street in 
Buffalo, for $20,000. 

At a meeting of the vestry, on December 5, 1865, the Rev. Dr. 
Shelton, having returned from Europe, presided, and $100 was voted 
to dress the church with evergreens at Christmas. 

1866. 

March 27, 1866, the vestry designated pews 53 and 55 charged 
and a double pew in the chapel was set apart instead for the family 
of Bishop Coxe. 



was at first filled with pews to within o. few feet of the main or west entrance of the 
church, and the two vestibules mentioned above were entirely separate from this 
space. The main doorway, or west entrance, originally opened directly opposite the 
main aisle. It was this doorway of which Mr. Jacob A. Barker of the building com- 
mittee writes to Mr. Upjohn in August, 1854, asking if outer doors cannot be arranged 
there. He says : ' ' Our people have almost abandoned the church in the winter, in 
consequence of the seeming impossibility of warming it, and this porch looks directly 
into the eye of the winter winds." Afterwards a west gallery was built, and in 1864 
the organ was removed to it, the pews under this gallery were removed, a glass parti- 
tion was placed across, and thus a large main vestibule was formed ; the doorways at 
the ends of the two aisles were walled up and made into deeply recessed niches, and 
doorways were cut through the solid stone walls, from the Erie Street entrance and 
from the smaller Pearl Street entrance, into the main vestibule. The old doorways at 
the western end, opening into the north and south aisles, were plainly visible after the 
fire of 1888, and show distinctly in the illustration given in this volume of the interior 
of the ruins of the west end of the church. 



102 History of St. Paul's Church. 

The treasurer reported that $1,815 was due and unpaid for pew 
taxes. The vestry invited Bishop Coxe to make St. Paul's Church the 
Cathedral Church of the Diocese of Western New York. 

The treasurer made his annual report, that $8,252.18 had been 
received for pew rents and other items, and $1,869.91 had been 
paid to the rector and the assistant rector, $1,125.67 for church 
music, $300 for the sexton, and $1,879.39 for insurance, taxes, inter- 
est and other itero.s, leaving a balance of $77.71 on hand. He 
estimated the expenses for the year ending Easter, 1867, to be 
$7,420, including $2,000 for the rector, with the rectory, and $2,500 
for the assistant rector. Three hundred and fifty dollars additional 
had been subscribed to pay for the bishop's residence by mem- 
bers of St. Paul's Church, and also $690 towards furnishing the 
same. 

At the annual election, Easter Monday, April 2, 1866, the Rev. 
Dr. Shelton presiding as the rector, Lester Brace and Charles W. 
Evans were elected wardens, and Lauren C. Woodruff, Asher P. 
Nichols, Edwin Hurlbert, Samuel G. Cornell, James Sweeney, James 
W. Brown, William H. Walker and Dr. Thomas F. Rochester, vestry- 
men. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry on April 4th, John B. 
Seymour was appointed clerk, and DeWitt C. Weed treasurer. 

A communication was received from Bishop Coxe accepting St. 
Paul's Church as the Cathedral Church of the Diocese. 

The vestry assessed a tax of eighteen per cent, on the valuation of 
the pews to pay the parish expenses for the coming year. 

The vestry met April 25, 1866, Rev. Dr. Shelton presided, and 
Bishop Coxe was present by invitation to advise with the vestry relative 
to making St. Paul's the Cathedral Church. The bishop addressed the 
vestry and stated that he was aware that he had not acquired any legal 
rights by the vote of the vestry and that whatever use he made of the 
church should be at all times subject to the wishes of the rector with 
whom he should in all instances wish to confer. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 103 

The vestry appointed a committee, consisting of the Rev. Dr. 
Shelton, A. P. Nichols and S. G. Cornell, to propose a plan to carry 
out the design of making St. Paul's Church, at the same time, a parish 
church and the Cathedral Church of the Diocese. 

The vestry met October 11, 1866. Rev. Dr. Shelton reported that 
$16,065 li^d been subscribed to complete the church edifice, to which 
was to be added $465 then in bank, making $16,530, and that he 
thought $3,000 more could be depended on to complete the church 
edifice in all its parts. Whereupon, the vestry appointed Samuel G. 
Cornell, Charles W. Evans, Edwin Hurlbert, James W. Brown and 
DeWitt C. Weed the building committee to complete the church 
edifice.* 



* October 13, 1866. — It was resolved to do the work by contract, if possible. 

December 21, 1866. — Mr. Upjohn writes to Dr. Shelton : — " I have sent by express 
the plans for the furniture of the chancel of St. Paul's Church, also the plan of the 
Episcopal chair. ... I have concluded to dispense with the crockets — the beads 
on each angle of the spire (as shown on some of the drawings), and to leave off the 
alternate rows of windows in the spire. It will then be quite rich enough to accord 
with the severity of the tower and church." 

March 6, 1867, Mr. Upjohn writes: — "Please take care that you do not get 
your work done under sub-contract. The building of spires should be done, if possi- 
ble, by men who have good knowledge of such work, who can cut a stone well, and 
lay it well of their own knowledge. I speak thus that you may avoid trouble. The 
building of a spire is too lofty a matter to be undertaken by any one who is not prac- 
tically a mason and stone-cutter." 

March g, 1867 (minutes) — The plan estimated on by Brown & Valentine shows 
the spire as designed to be 120 feet in height from the square of the tower. 

May 18, 1867 (minutes). — '' The vestry is now ready to contract for the building 
of the two spires, to complete the chimney tops, crosses, finials, etc. , of the church 
edifice, also to point the work as it progresses." 

September 2, 1867. — The Committee contracted with Mr. Garibaldi for the paint- 
ing and decoration of the church edifice. It was decided that the interior walls 
should be finished in plaster. 

The church was closed from August 18, 1867, until November 17, 1S67. — From 
Minutes of Building Committee, letters, etc. 



104 History of St. Paul's Church. 

1867. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 22, 1867, the Rev. 
Dr. Shelton presiding, Lester Brace and Charles W. Evans were 
elected wardens, and S. G. Cornell, L. C. Woodruff, William H. Walker, 
Dr. Thomas F. Rochester, Asher P. Nichols, John T. Lacy, James 
Sweeney and James W. Brown, vestrymen. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry John B. Seymour was 
appointed clerk and DeWitt C Weed treasurer, and Messrs. Cornell, 
Evans, Brown and Weed were chosen the building committee. They 
reported that they had a proposition from Mr. Green of Medina to 
complete the church edifice for $17,000. They estimated $2,000 for 
cleaning and painting the inside of the church ; extension of the 
organ loft, $800 ; Mr. Upjohn's commissions, $1,000 ; superintendent's 
salary $900 ; in all, $21,700. The vestry levied twenty per cent, tax 
on the valuation of the pews to pay the parish expenses for the coming 
year. The treasurer made his annual report, showing receipts for pew 
taxes and other items of $8,109.61, all of which was disbursed for the 
parish expenses, and $1,685.35 due to sundry persons, and $1,710.79 
due to the parish for uncollected pew taxes. He estimated the expenses 
for the coming year at $7,595, of which $4,500 was for the salary of the 
rector and assistant rector. 

Amount of pews sold $44,875.50 and $13,487.50 available ; total, 

158,363- 

At a meeting of the vestry, October 3, 1 867, Rev. Dr. Shelton presiding, 
a letter from the Rev. Dr. Pitkin was read, stating that he had accepted 
an invitation to the rectorship of St. Paul's Church, Detroit, and tender- 
ing his resignation as assistant rector of St. Paul's Church in Buffalo. 
The resignation was accepted, and suitable resolutions were adopted 
on the occasion. The Rev. Dr. Pitkin died in Detroit, in May, 1887. 

Dr. Thomas F. Rochester and James W. Brown resigned as mem- 
bers of the vestry. Asher P. Nichols resigned as a member of the 
vestry on February 3, 1868. 



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History of St. Paul's Church. 105 

1868. 

At a meeting of the vestry, March 25, 1868, $1,600 was appropri- 
ated for the expenses of the music for the coming year, and the thanks 
of the vestry was voted to Messrs. Hobart Weed and Henry Bull for 
the efficient and most acceptable manner in which they had conducted 
the music during the past year, and the hope was expressed that they 
enter upon the next year with the full determination of making the 
reputation of St. Paul's Church choir the first in the diocese. 

At the annual meeting on Easter Monday, April 13, 1868, the Rev. 
Dr. Shelton presiding, Lester Brace and Charles W. Evans were 
elected wardens, and L. C. Woodruff, William H. Walker, S. G. 
Cornell, John T. Lacy, James Sweeney, George S. Hazard, John 
Pease and Henry C. Squire, vestrymen. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry on April 17th, John B. 
Seymour was appointed clerk, and DeWitt C. Weed treasurer. The 
vestry levied a, tax of twenty per cent, on the valuation of the pews 
for th? ensuing year. Rev. E)r. Shelton stated that he had made an 
arrangement with the Rev. J. K. Stone, president of Kenyon College, 
Ohio, to act as his assistant from June ist to September i, 1868. He 
acted as such only for a short time. 

The treasurer made his annual report, showing the receipts and dis- 
bursements to have been $9,234.31. 

At a meeting of the vestry, July 31, 1868, it was resolved that the 
selection by the Rev. Dr. Shelton of the Rev. Percy Brown as his 
assistant be approved of, and that the sum of $2,500 be placed at his 
disposal for the payment of the salary of his assistant. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry the Rev. Dr. Shelton 
stated that he had received a letter from the Rev. Percy Brown stating 
his inability to accept the position of assistant minister. 

The vestry presented to Mrs. Shelton the old Bible heretofore 
used in the church services. The treasurer was authorized to pay for 
the new books purchased for the chancel. 



io6 History of St. Paul's Church. 

1869. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, March 29, 1869, Rev. 
Dr. Shelton presiding, Lester Brace and Charles W. Evans were 
elected wardens, and L. C. Woodruff, S. G. Cornell, William H. 
Walker, James Sweeney, A. Porter Thompson, John T. Lacy, John 
Pease and George S. Hazard, vestrymen. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry on April 2, 1869, John B. 
Seymour was appointed clerk, and DeWitt C. Weed treasurer. 

On April 2, 1869, the vestry levied a tax of twenty per cent, on the 
valuation of the pews for the parish expenses for the coming year. 

The treasurer reported that the receipts for parish purposes were 
$8,959.40 for the past year, and that the uncollected pew taxes and 
rents were $2,340.63, and that the estimated expenses of the parish for 
the ensuing year were $8,010.88, including $2,000 salary to the rector 
and $2,000 to his assistant. 

The treasurer reported subscriptions and other receipts for the 
building fund to be $17,742.07, and the disbursements $17,519.59, of 
which $2,826.65 was for the chancel improvements ; decorating the 
inside walls of the church, $2,494 ; extending the organ gallery, 
$1,068.09 ; new carpets, $1,051.10. 

The vestry approved of the selection by the Rev. Dr. Shelton of 
the Rev. Charles L. Hutchins as his assistant, and appropriated $3,000 
to be placed at the disposal of the rector to pay the salary of the 
assistant, and the treasurer was authorized to pay the expenses of the 
removal of Mr. Hutchins and family to Buffalo. 



1870. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 18, 1870, the Rev. 
Dr. Shelton presiding, Charles W. Evans was elected senior warden, 
and Samuel G. Cornell junior warden, and L. C. Woodruff, William 




ST. PAUL'S FROM SOUTH DIVISION STREET. 
Just before the completion of the main spire by the addition of the finial and cross. 
The cross was put in place August 6, 1870. (See pages 108, 314 to .■^i3.) 



Enlarg^ed from a stert-oscopic phot(p{,'raph 
taken b>' C. L. Ponil. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 107 

H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson, James Sweeney, Cyrus Clarke, John T. 
Lacy, John Pease and John L. Kimberly, Jr., vestrymen. 

Charles W. Evans was elected senior warden in place of Lester 
Brace, on account of Mr. Brace's advanced age and infirm health. Mr. 
Brace died the next year, aged eighty-one. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry on April 25th, John B. Sey- 
mour was appointed clerk, and DeWitt C. Weed treasurer ; Charles W. 
Evans, DeWitt C. Weed, and Cyrus Clarke were appointed the building 
committie.* 

The vestry levied a tax of twenty per cent, on the valuation of the 
pews to pay the parish expenses for the coming year. The vestry desig- 
nated Hobart Weed, Claude Hamilton, Frederick Barton, Henry Bull 
and James Pease to aid in assigning seats in church to strangers. 

The treasurer reported the receipts and disbursements for parish 
expenses were $8,819.63, and that $1,959.78 was due for pew taxes and 
rents, of which $900 had been due for some years. 

Loring Peirce, formerly the sexton of the parish, and for many 
years the conductor of the funerals of the parishioners, died May 25, 
1870. His respectful sympathy for surviving friends, and particularly 
with young mothers bereaved of their infant children, was very grate- 
ful. He attended to the burial of the dead for more than forty years, 
and was a much respected citizen. f 



* One of the Buffalo daily papers speaks as follows of the work on the church 
edifice at this time : 

" The general superintendence of the work now going on is in the hands 
of Edwin Hurlbert ; the cutting and laying of the stone is in charge of William S. 
Cass, and John Locke has the supervision of the mason work. Messrs. Hurlbert 
and Locke are well known in this city. Mr. Cass has had great experience in English 
cathedrals and churches, superintending in 1835 the rehanging of Big Tom, of Lin- 
coln ; and he has built Gothic stone churches at Haynton and at Easton, in Lincoln- 
shire. . . . The building of the church has not been done by contract, but by 
day labor." 

f In the remarks made by Dr. Shelton at the funeral of Loring Peirce, he said : 
" During nearly half a century he has continued his useful offices to the 



(o8 History of St. Paul's Church. 

On June 5, 1870, at the Whitsuntide Sunday School festival, the 
Rev. Mr. Hutchins stated that the children of the Sunday School had 
contributed $100 for a cross to be placed on the spire of the church, 
when completed. 

The Buffalo Express, of August i, 1870, has the following in regard 
to St. Paul's spire : 

" All that now remains to complete the spire of St. Paul's Cathedral, 
is one more stone — the finial — and the cross which is to surmount 
it ; then the scaffolding will be removed, unveiling one of the most 
elegant models of architecture to be found in this or any other 
country. Saturday we again made the toilsome ascent, and from the 
topmost platform enjoyed a most delightful bird's-eye view of the city, 
the surrounding country, the lake and Niagara River. The few who 
are, or have been permitted to make the ascent, may consider themselves 
peculiarly fortunate, as probably no other occasion will ever present 
itself where the city may be viewed from so elevated a point. When the 
scaffolding is removed a fine observation may be made from the top- 
most windows, but away to a great height above them tapers the slender 

dead. . . . Early and late, untiringly, and with no regard to his own ease or 
comfort. ... In the beginning of the town the burying place was where the 
center of the city now is. This ground — which is now a vacant square — was filled 
with the graves of the first settlers and early inhabitants of the village. But in 1832 
there was a demand made for a burial place more remote, and the lot on Delaware 
Street was selected. This, it soon became manifest, was also too near the city. 
Then a lot farther out was selected as a general burying place ; then another adjoin- 
ing was chosen, and lastly Forest Lawn was adopted as the burying place of all 
Protestants. There is not a foot of either of these grounds with which he has not 
been familiar. In one or another of them he has laid the bodies of those who laid 
the foundation of our city. . . In his early life he was the only person here 

engaged in this sad duty of caring for the dead. ... In all the periods of the 
visitations of that dreadful scourge, the cholera, he was ever in the midst of it ; . . 
by night and by day he was ever in the thickest of the pestilence, as well with the 
poor and defenseless as with the rich ; all alike received his care and attention." . . 




GENERAL VIEW OF BUFFALO IX 1870. 
Looking north from the scaffolding on the main spire of St. Paul's. (See page 108.) 



Enlarged from a stereoscopic photot,-raph 
taken by C. L. Pond. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 109 

spire, its smooth octagonal surface giving neither foot-hold nor finger- 
hold to the adventurous. From the ground level to the top of the finial 
will be exactly 255 feet ; the copper cross which will terminate the spire 
is to be 3 feet 8 inches, making the entire height 258 feet 8 inches. The 
builder of the celebrated spire of Trinity Church, New York, while on a 
recent visit to this city, asserted that its height is no greater than that 
of St. Paul's, the former structure not having been carried up to the full 
height called for by the plans. If this be as affirmed, our spire is second 
only in the United States to that of the cathedral in St. Louis." 

The Buffalo Commercial of Monday, August 8, 1870, has the follow- 
ing account of the final placing of the cross on the finished spire : 

" The work upon the spire of St. Paul's Cathedral, so long in pro- 
gress, was completed on Saturday afternoon, August 6th, and the tower 
now stands 'a thing of beauty.' The gilded cross by which the stone 
finial is surmounted is of copper, thrice gilt, 3 feet 8 inches by 2 feet 5 
inches, and was made by Henry Goldsmith of Grand Street, New York, 
at a cost to the church of $145. The cross was set in its place by the 
Rev. Charles L. Hutchins, assistant minister of St. Paul's ' in the Name 
of the Ever-Blessed Trinity — the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.' 

" The work of removing the scaffolding has already been com- 
menced, and within a short time the magnificent spire will stand out, 
unencumbered, in all its beautiful proportions. Work upon the smaller 
spire at the easterly extremity of the church will not, we understand, 
be proceeded with at this time." 

The sermon preached by Dr. Shelton on Sunday, August 7, 1870, 
was replete with historical data. The following extracts from it give 
a short resume of the building of the church : " A twenty-years' 
labor has been finished, and I may be permitted to congratulate you, 
my friends, and parishioners, upon the essential completion of our 
grand and graceful church. The cross, which surmounts the very 
elegant spire, has at length been placed in its position, surmounting 



no History of St. Paul's Church. 

the structure of which it is its last ornament Who 

shall recount the efforts which have been put forth to bring this church 
to its present condition ? It was begun by the young men of the con- 
gregation in 1847, who subscribed a small sum each. This sum was 
but an earnest of a better day, and, small as it was, it had the effect of 
calling the attention of the parish to the subject, and in 1849 a resolve 
was made to remove the time-honored and long-used edifice and com- 
mence another. The effort then made was to obtain some $50,000, 
being assured by the architect that that sum would complete the 
edifice. It did not accomplish what had been proposed. Accord- 
ingly, in 185 1, a new subscription was begun. This also did not 
answer the full demand, and again in 1854 another effort was made. 
This also was not equal to the requirement. Again in 1866, and in 
1867, and lastly in 1869, a subscription was presented, and I may add, 
all these were promptly and readily responded to. Six times it has 

been my duty to make the same claim The full amount 

of all that has been paid is, as near as I can estimate, $156,000, and be- 
yond this there has been made a loan of $5,000. So that the total 

cost has been about f 161, 000 Some gifts as testimonials 

of good will have been given, but the great mass of this large sum has 
been given by those who now occupy the seats before me, or by those 
who have laid aside their mortal cares, and have been gathered to 

their fathers The effort which has been made by this 

congregation, extending as it has over a period of twenty-three years, 
has been a great if not a gigantic one. It has called perpetually for 
exertion, self-denial, and continued open-handed and open-hearted 
liberality." * 

187 I. 

At a meeting of the vestry, February 6, 187 1, the following preamble 
and resolutions were adopted : Whereas, the Hon. Henry Shelton 
Sanford and his wife have presented to the parish, through the rector, 

* See appendix for subscription lists. 




ST. PAUL'S FROM MAIN STKliEF, IN 1870, 
Alter the completion of the main spire, Autrust 6, 1070, and before the work upon the smaller 



spire had been begun. 'See pag-es iqj. 314 to 318 



From a photoeraph by C. W. Bigjen. 



History of St. Paul's Church. in 

a most beautiful and highly burnished brass eagle lectern, it is resolved 
that the thanks of the vestry and parish be tendered to Mr. and Mrs. 
Sanford for their valuable gift.* 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April lo, 1871, Rev. 
Dr. Shelton presiding, Charles W. Evans and L. C. Woodruff were 
elected wardens, and Cyrus Clarke, John T. Lacy. Howard H. Baker, 
Mark B. Moore, George Beals, George H. Smith, Henry T. Gillett 
and Dr. C. C. Wyckoff, vestrymen. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry on April 17, 187 1, John B. 
Seymour was appointed clerk, and George Beals treasurer. 

Mr. Weed declined a reelection as treasurer, and the vestry, in 
accepting his resignation, tendered him their thanks for his faithful 
services and for the ability with which he had managed the finances. 
The vestry levied a tax of twenty per cent, on the pews to pay the 
parish expenses for the ensuing year. 

The treasurer reported that the parish receipts for the past year 
were $10,722.67, which included $1,000 contributed by nine members 
of the congregation to aid in paying the parish expenses. 

On May 30th L. C. Woodruff and Charles W. Evans were appointed 
a building committee to complete the small tower on Church Street, 
also the stone crosses, finials, etc.f 

At a meeting of the vestry, September 21, 187 1, George Beals 
resigned as treasurer, and James W. Sanford was chosen in his place. 

At a meeting of the vestry, December 11, 1871, the rector sub- 
mitted the following memorial on the occasion of the death of Lester 
Brace, for many years one of the vestry. " He was eighty- one years of 
age, and had lived in the parish longer than any male member of it, 
was confirmed at Black Rock by Bishop Hobart in 1828, and had been 
a consistent Christian from that time. He was a warden of the parish 

* This lectern was destroyed at the burning of the church, May 10, 1888. 

f The finial of this tower was placed in position October 2, 1871, and the numer- 
ous stone crosses, etc., were finished in May, 1873, thus practically completing the 
edifice. 



1 1 2 History of St. Paul 's Church. 

for fifteen years, and the correctness of his life ever commanded the 
approval of the congregation. He was in his public life honest and 
just ; in his family, affectionate, careful and prudent; in his daily walks, 
an attentive and zealous reader of the Holy Scriptures and devotional 
books. He has left an example of such Christian conduct as may well 
be imitated. His last years were filled with grief for the loss of his 
entire family, — his excellent wife and children, within a short period 
of each other, died, and left him alone, under God, to the care of his 
affectionate grandchildren. It is well to be recorded of him that he 
bore his losses with a Christian spirit, and looked anxiously forward 
to his release from a world of sorrow to one of everlasting happiness." 

The vestry adopted the memorial, and bore testimony of his merits 
as a man and his faith as a Christian. 

Mrs. Sevilla Hayden was the daughter of Lester Brace, and died in 
July, 1870 ; she was one of the most efficient parishioners of St. Paul's, 
and devoted to the interests of the parish. She was the widow of the 
late Albert Hayden, who died on the overland route to California 
in 1849. 

1872. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April i, 1872, the Rev. 
Dr. Shelton presiding, Charles W. Evans and William H. Walker were 
elected wardens, and L. C. Woodruff, S. G. Cornell, John Pease, Cyrus 
Clarke, Howard H. Baker, George S. Hazard, George F. Lee and 
George Beals, vestrymen. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry on April loth, John B. Sey- 
mour was appointed clerk, and James W. Sanford treasurer. The 
vestry levied a tax of twenty per cent, on the valuation of the pews, to 
pay the parish expenses for the coming year. 

The clerk was directed to execute a note to the Rev. Dr. Shelton 
for $1,850, with interest from April ist, for the arrears of salary due 
him as rector. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 113 

The Rev. Charles L. Hutchins having resigned as the assistant rec- 
tor of the parish, the resignation taking effect on April ist, and having 
expressed his best wishes for the individual good and prosperity of the 
parish, the vestry reciprocated his kind words, and wished him abund- 
ant success in any field of labor to which he might be called. The sum 
of $25 was appropriated to pay the traveling expenses of the Rev. 
Charles S. Hale to Buffalo, as the assistant minister of the parish. 

The treasurer made his annual report, showing $7,960.04 received 
for pew taxes and rents, and $7,55303 paid for parish expenses, and 
$1,850 due to the Rev. Dr. Shelton ; unpaid pew rents and taxes 
$1,385.71. Estimated expenses for the coming year $7,145, including 
$2,000 for the rector's salary and $1,500 for the assistant rector. 

It was understood that the assistant rector, who was unmarried, 
should board with the rector. 

The rectory was mortgaged for $7,500 to the Erie County Savings 
Bank, and $1,161.70 was collected in church on Easter Sunday, March 
31st, to pay other debts due by the parish. Said debts being in addi- 
tion to the $1,850 due to the rector. 

Eliza, wife of John Pease, died in October, 1872, at the age of fifty- 
four. She was the eldest daughter of the late James L. Barton, and 
Sarah Maria Barton, his wife. Mrs. Pease was one of the representative 
women of St. Paul's Church. In the obituary notice of her it is stated 
that "for nearly forty years she was a devoted member of the parish, 
and during all that time none were more prominent or active in good 
works as well inside the church as out of it. In every walk of life 
she was an excellent and exemplary woman. In her family, in the 
church, in the Sunday School and in society, she was always active, 
useful and influential for good ; she worked without ostentation, and 
seemed to be content with the consciousness of doing her duty." In 
the obituary notice of Mrs. Sarah Maria Barton, the mother of Mrs. 
Pease, who died in December, 185 1, at the age of fifty-three, it was 
stated that " she had been a most valued and useful member of the 
church for more than twenty-five years, and a resident of Black Rock 



114 History of St. Paul's Church. 

and Buffalo for more than thirty-one years. Possessed of untiring 
industry and systematic frugality, which never descended into illiber- 
ality, her hand and heart were always open to the call of the necessi- 
tous, and her house was the abode of hospitality and kindness. She 
was the mother of eleven children, seven of whom survived her." 

At a meeting of the vestry, November 13, 1872, Hobart Weed, 
from the music committee, reported that the organ, which had been in 
use for twenty-one years, was in bad condition and a new one was 
required. The rector was authorized to appoint a committee to raise 
sufficient funds by subscription, and by the sale of the old organ, to 
purchase a new one in place of the same. 

The vestry resolved that the salary of the rector be increased to 
$3,500, out of which he was to pay the salary of the assistant minister. 

1873- 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 14, 1873, Rev. 
Dr. Shelton presiding, Charles W. Evans, and S. G. Cornell were 
elected wardens, and L. C. Woodruff, Cyrus Clarke, William H. 
Walker, George S. Hazard, John Pease, George F. Lee, Howard H. 
Baker and George Beals, vestrymen. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry on April 21st, John B. Sey- 
mour was appointed clerk, and James W. Sanford treasurer. The 
vestry levied a tax of twenty per cent, on the valuation of the pews to 
pay the parish expenses for the ensuing year. 

The vestry returned their thanks to Hobart Weed and Dr. Daboll for 
their services on the music committee, and $1,700 was appropriated to 
pay for the music for the coming year. William H. Walker and Howard 
H. Baker, from the organ committee, reported that they had obtained 
subscriptions from forty-five members of the congregation amounting to 
$6,555, and that a contract had been made with E. and G. G. Hook & 
Hastings of Boston, Mass., for a new organ, to cost $7,500, they to take 




THE REVEREND WILLIAM SHELTOX, D. D., in his seventy-second year. 

Born, September n. lygS ; Rector of St. Paul's Church, September ii, 1S29, to 

January 11, 1S81 ; Honorary Rector until his death, ('October it, 1883, 



From a photograph taken by 
\\". J. Haker early in 1870. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 115 

the old organ at $1,000, as part pay, the new organ to be in place by 
September i, 1873. The vestry returned thanks to Rodney Kendrick 
for the very perfect and accurate ground plan of the church, presented 
by him. 

The treasurer made his annual report, showing the receipts and 
disbursements to have been $8,759.69 for the past year, $982 due to 
the Rev. Dr. Shelton on last year's salary, and $2,828.50 due for 
pew rents and taxes. Estimated expenses for the coming year $7,600. 
The vestry returned thanks to James W. Sanford for the able and satis- 
factory manner in which he conducted the arduous duties of treasurer 
of the parish. 

September nth, Charles W. Evans, from the committee appointed in 
1 87 1 to complete the small tower on Church Street, also the stone 
crosses, finials, etc., reported that a contract was made with William 
S. Cass to complete the same for $1,179, ''"d 'hat the work had been 
completed, in May, 1873, and had been paid for by thirteen members 
of the congregation. 

The senior warden reported that he had contracted to have the 
church edifice thoroughly cleaned by August 25, 1873, for the sum of 
$350, to be paid for by subscriptions. 

In 1873, Ralph Williams died very suddenly. He was one of the 
oldest colored citizens of Buffalo, and had been the faithful and 
efficient sexton of St. Paul's for twenty years. He was attending to 
his duties at the church when seized with sudden illness, and died in 
the carriage in which he was being taken to his home. 

1874. 

At a meeting of the vestry, February 14, 1874, resolutions were 
adopted on the occasion of the death of George F. Lee, expressing 
the sorrow of the vestry at the death of their friend and associate, and 
their desire to place on record their grateful remembrance of his faith- 
ful and efficient services as a member of the vestry. 



ii6 History of St. Paul's Church. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 13, 1874, the Rev. 
Dr. Shelton presiding, Charles W. Evans and William H. Walker 
were elected wardens, and L. C. Woodruff, George S. Hazard, Mark B. 
Moore, Howard H. Baker, George Beals, DeWitt C. Weed and Cyrus 
Clarke, vestrymen. 

At a subsequent meeting of the vestry John B. Seymour was 
appointed clerk, and James W. Sanford treasurer. 

The vestry levied a tax of twenty per cent, on the valuation of the 
pews, to pay the parish expenses for the coming year, and also resolved 
that the salary of the rector be $4,000 per annum, and that he pay the 
assistant minister out of the said sum. The sum of $i,8oo was appro- 
priated to pay for the church music for the coming year. 

The treasurer reported that George Beals had donated the coal bill 
due by the parish to him since February 20, 1871, amounting to $208. 
The treasurer also reported that $1,850 was due to the rector for his 
salary to Easter, 1871, and $1,077.33 for the same at Easter, 1874, and 
that $2,790.98 was due to the parish for rents and taxes on the pews. 

On March 8, 1874, Millard Fillmore, ex-President of the United 
States, died at his residence on Niagara Square, Buffalo, aged 74 years. 

On March 12th the body was removed from the residence to 
St. Paul's Church, where, in the vestibule of the church, which was 
heavily draped with mourning, the remains lay in state from 10 A. M. 
until I P. M. A detachment of Company " D," Buffalo City Guard, 
acted as a guard of honor ; they were relieved later by a detachment 
of the ist U. S. Infantry. 

The doors were thrown open to the public, and a continuous stream 
of people, entering by the Erie-street entrance and passing out on 
Pearl Street, viewed the body. At one o'clock the bells of St. Paul's 
rang out a solemn funeral peal, and shortly after two o'clock the 
funeral services were begun, the Rev. William Shelton, D. D., deliver- 
ing the funeral sermon. The church was crowded to its utmost 
capacity, and the streets about the church were thronged by many 
thousands of people, who were unable to obtain admission. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 117 

The funeral was one of the most solemn and impressive ever held 
in thi church. 

1875- 

At the annual election, March 29, 1875, Rev. Dr. Shelton presiding, 
Charles W. Evans and William H. Walker were elected wardens, and 
L. C. Woodruff, Cyrus Clarke, John Pease, George Beals, M. B. Moore, 
H. H. Baker, George S. Hazard and James Sweeney, vestrymen.* 

At a subsequent meeting John B. Seymour was appointed clerk, and 
James W. Sanford treasurer. April 23, 1875, the vestry authorized St. 
Paul's Guildf to purchase the lot on Spruce Street, near Genesee Street, 
on which to erect the German mission church and school, the expendi- 
ture not to exceed $2,000. June 4, 1875, it was reported to the vestry 
that the lot on Spruce Street had been purchased for $1,800, $400 paid 
in cash, and the bond and mortgage of St. Paul's Church given for 
$1,400, and the building for the German mission thereon had been 
contracted for at $1,500. It was formally opened for divine worship 
by the bishop on Sunday, August i, 1875. 

September 4, 1875, a committee was appointed to confer with Mr. 
Kip and request him to pay certain funds held by him for a former 
mission to the present German mission church. 

* At Easter, 1875, the Rev. Charles S. Hale resigned as assistant minister of St. 
Paul's, and became the first rector of the new church of St. Mary's-on-the-Hill, on the 
corner of Prospect Avenue and Vermont Street, which was opened for the first time 
for divine service on Easter Sunday afternoon, March 28, 1875. The church was 
built mainly through the efforts and generosity of Mr. De Witt C. Weed, then one of 
the vestry of St. Paul's. The Rev. Mr. Hale was married to Mrs. Louisa Weed 
Stevens, only sister of Mr. Weed, in July, 1875. St. Paul's was without a regular 
assistant until November, 1875, when the Rev. S. Humphreys Gurteen accepted that 
position. The Rev. Dr. Hobart of Geneva and the Rev. Mr. Hughes of New York 
had supplied the pulpit and assisted Dr. Shelton through the summer months, the 
Rev. Mr. Hughes becoming rector of St. John's Church, Buffalo, in November, 1875. 

Mr. Gurteen had been assistant minister at Trinity Church, Geneva, N. Y. He 
was ordained priest by Bishop Coxe in St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, in December, 1875. 

f For historical sketch of St. Paul's Guild see appendix. 



Ii8 History of St. Paul's Church. 

December 13, 1875, f^he treasurer of the organ fund reported sub- 
scriptions from forty-nine persons, amounting to $7,125, to purchase 
the new organ for the church edifice. 

August 30, 1875, John S. Ganson died in the 73d year of his age. 
Coming from Batavia to Buffalo in 1850, he was well known as a banker, 
being president and principal stockholder of the New York and Erie 
Bank up to the time of his death. He was a prominent member of 
St. Paul's parish, and a vestryman from 1854 to 1859 and again in 1861 
and 1862. He was the father of Mrs. James Sweeney and of Mrs. 
William B. Depew. 

1876. 

February 9, 1876, the vestry was called to devise ways and means 
to pay off the debt incurred in refitting the Sunday-School room in the 
basement of the church, which had been done under the supervision 
of the assistant minister, the Rev. S. H. Gurteen. The subject was, 
after some discussion, referred to the wardens. February 17, 1876, the 
subject was again discussed but no action was taken. March 8, 1876, 
it was stated that a fund had been raised some time ago for the pur- 
pose of erecting a Sunday School building, which fund was deposited 
in the Erie County Savings Bank to the credit of the wardens. It was 
therefore resolved that the vestry borrow $600 of the said funds, to be 
repaid in annual installments of $50 each, with annual interest thereon, 
to be repaid to the wardens from the receipts from the receiving vault 
for the dead, in the basement of the church, which receipts had been 
heretofore applied for Sunday School purposes. 

Elizabeth Staats Seymour died in March, 1876, aged sixty years. 
She was married in 1840 to Horatio Seymour, Jr., who died in 1872. 
From 1869 to 1876 she lost, in succession, her mother, her two sons, 
and her husband. Her uncle Jeremiah Staats, the last of the family, 
never married, and died May 4, 1887, at the advanced age of ninety- 
one. In her obituary notice, it is stated that Mrs. Seymour was a born 
philanthropist, and a womanly woman always. She courted neither 




ST. PAUL'S AXD GENERAL VIEW OF THE CITY. 

Looking southeast from the tower of the unfinished City Hail in 1075. St. John's Church and 

W'ashing-ton Street Baptist Church in distance. 



Enlarged from a stereoscopic photojrraph 
taken Lpy C, L. I'ond 



History of St. Paul's Church. 119 

luxury nor repose ; rest was something impossible to her while she felt 
that her assistance was needed, and she was always ready to attend to 
her parish duties. She had been a parishioner of St. Paul's for forty 
years. Her funeral was largely attended from the church. She 
bequeathed $500 to the parish for a memorial window in the Sunday- 
School building. 

April 10, 1876, the vestry accepted the proposition of St. Paul's 
Church Guild to take charge of the church edifice, and to attend to 
the duties of the sexton, in keeping the same in proper order. 

At the annual meeting April 17, 1876, the same wardens were 
elected, and L. C. Woodruff, Cyrus Clarke, John Pease, M. B. Moore, 
G. S. Hazard, H. H. Baker, D. C. Godwin and A. R. Davidson, vestry- 
men, John B. Seymour clerk, and J. W. Sanford treasurer. 

The vestry subsequently appropriated $1,800 for the music for the 
coming year. 

A history of the parish of St. Paul's necessarily presupposes more 
or less mention of the parishioners, and, of course, those most mentioned 
would be those who administered its temporal affairs. It must not be 
supposed, however, that they alone gave tone to the parish life or 
alone guided its best interests. The most excellent and good Christian 
women of the parish were the ones who did the most, and who really 
gave tone, not only to the parish life, but to the social life of the 
parishioners, and yet their services and works were rarely written in 
the parish records ; but their good works in the Ladies' Society 
and particularly in the Sunday School, were of the greatest benefit 
to the parish, and especially so to the younger members. Their good 
influences lasted from generation to generation. In social life the 
women of the parish made social intercourse not only a pleasure, but 
useful and beneficial to its participants. The parish was conservative 
in all church observances and in daily life. The good principles which 
governed it were those inculcated by Dr. Shelton. He taught all 
the parishioners, particularly the younger ones, that the prayer book, 
next to the Bible, was the best of all books, that the sacraments were 



I20 History of St. Paul's Church. 

not to be lightly regarded, but faithfully observed. He sought so to 
instill precept on precept as to give life and nourishment to the inner 
life, and his sermons were mostly of that character ; he was rarely 
eloquent in them, but sought to instruct the people by calm reasoning 
rather than by eloquence. He was so honest and straightforward, not 
only in his church life, but in his daily walks, that his people learned 
to place full reliance on him, and to be governed by his good counsels. 
His congregation during fifty years of his ministry in St. Paul's was 
composed of all sorts and conditions of men, but such was his power 
of adaptation that he reconciled all adverse tendencies, and, as it were, 
so cultivated their inner nature as to conduce not only to their own 
good but to the best interests of the parish. He said in one of his 
sermons that a good churchman is good in all things ; that is, good 
churchmanship gives a right judgment in all things. He taught that 
a neglect and disuse of religious duties would tend to the decay of the 
spiritual life, and an entire neglect and' disuse end in barbarism. He 
himself was a manly, straightforward and consistent churchman, and, 
by his conversation and attentions to the daily duties of life, taught 
his congregation to be the same. His rich and full voice, so often 
heard in all the church services and in the reading of the Scripture 
lessons, will long be remembered. 

December 14, 1876, the vestry adopted resolutions relative to the 
death of DeWitt C. Weed, for many years treasurer of the parish and 
one of the vestry. It was resolved that he was always among the fore- 
most in his devotion to the interests of the parish, and a constant and 
large contributor to its support, and that his Christian character, his 
devout and regular attendance upon Divine worship, his unaffected 
piety, his probity and sterling worth, will always be remembered, and 
his example will remain a precious legacy to his family, to his friends 
and all who knew him. 

DeWitt C. Weed died November 16, 1876. He was born in Buffalo 
September 16, 1824, and was the eldest son of the late Thaddeus and 
Louisa Chapin Weed. His father, Thaddeus Weed, was an old and 



History of St. Paul's Church. 121 

valued citizen of Buffalo, at one time the principal hardware merchant 
of the city, the Weed Hardware Store on the north-west corner of 
Main and Swan streets being still prominent. His mother was a 
daughter of Dr. Cyrenius Chapin, one of the pioneers of Buffalo, and 
one of its brave defenders at its burning by the British in 181 3. 

The family have been connected with St. Paul's parish almost since 
its foundation. 

DeWitt C. Weed was from early youth an active member of St. 
Paul's ; in 1847 and after, one of the "junior vestry, "and prominent in 
working for the building of the new church. He was on the first 
building committee in 1849, and on that of 1867 and 1870 ; a member 
of the vestry in 1856, 1857, 1863 and 1874, and treasurer of the parish 
from 1858 to 1870, resigning in 1871. He was, to all intents and pur- 
poses, the founder of the church of St. Mary's- on-the- Hill, which was 
not far from his home on Connecticut Street. 

DeWitt C. Weed married, June 2, 1853, Miss Lucy Kimberley, 
second daughter of John L. Kimberley. Mrs. Weed survives him, 
also two daughters and a son. 

1877. 

Edwin Hurlbert died in January, 1877, He was a vestryman in 
St. Paul's in 1865 and 1866, and was one of the building committee in 
the construction of the spire on the main tower. His intelligent super- 
vision and almost constant attention to the details of the architect's 
plans resulted in the graceful and well-proportioned spire of our 
beautiful church edifice. 

February 24, 1877, the vestry met, the Rev. Dr. Shelton in the 
chair. It was stated that the object of the meeting was for the pur- 
pose of considering the propriety of electing the assistant, the Rev. S. 
H. Gurteen as assistant rector of St. Paul's Church. Permission was 
given the Rev. Mr. Gurteen to extend the organ loft four feet forward 
and to place a chancel organ over the vestry room. 



122 History of St. Paul's Church. 

March 6, 1877, the vestry passed the resolution that the Rev. S. H. 
Gurteen be elected the assistant rector of the parish and that his 
salary be $2,500 per annum, and that the salary of the Rev. Dr. Shel- 
ton as the rector be $1,000 per annum. 

March 14, 1877, it was reported to the vestry that Mr. Kip declined 
to give up the funds in his hands, contributed for a former mission to 
the present German mission. 

April 2, 1877, at the annual election, Rev. Dr. Shelton presiding, 
C. W. Evans and W. H. Walker were elected wardens, and Cyrus 
Clarke, L. C. Woodruff, John Pease, G. S. Hazard, M. B. Moore, H. H. 
Baker, Dr. A. R. Davidson and A. P. Thompson, vestrymen ; April 
i6th, J. B. Seymour was appointed clerk, and J. W. Sanford treasurer. 

September 7, 1877, George B. Dudley was elected clerk of the 
vestry in place of John B. Seymour, deceased. The vestry passed 
resolutions relative to the death of John B. Seymour, late clerk of 
the vestry, and placed on record their appreciation of the faithful 
manner in which he had discharged the duties of his office, and bore 
testimony to his many excellent qualities, and tendered to his widow 
and family the assurances of their deep sympathy in their irreparable 
loss. The vestry agreed that the parish should pay $280 per annum 
for the support of the Episcopate. 

1878. 

March 28, 1878, the rector called the attention of the vestry to a 
call that the Rev. S. H. Gurteen, the assistant rector, had received from 
Emmanuel Church in Boston, Mass. 

March 30, 1878, the vestry requested the Legislature of the State 
of New York to pass an act in regard to the powers of an associate 
rector of St. Paul's Church, and also passed a resolution that the 
official relations of the Rev. Mr. Gurteen be the same and declared to 
be associate rector, and that his salary be $4,000 per annum from and 
after April i, 1878, and that he be requested to organize a full choral 



History of St. Paul's Church. 123 

service for St. Paul's Church to be used for each Sunday evening ser- 
vice, and authorized to make such alterations in the chancel as he may 
deem necessary for that purpose. 

At the annual election, April 22, 1878, the Rev. Dr. Shelton 
presiding, Charles W. Evans and William H. Walker were elected 
wardens, and Cyrus Clarke, L. C. Woodruff, John Pease, G. S. Hazard, 
Mark B. Moore, Howard H. Baker, Dr. A. R. Davidson and A. Porter 
Thompson, vestrymen. George B. Dudley was appointed clerk, and 
James W. Sanford treasurer. 

1879. 

Elijah Ford, formerly one of the vestry, died in March, 1879, at 
the age of seventy-four. He took great interest in the construction of 
the church edifice, and his legal advice and services were of much 
value to the vestry, and were freely given in addition to his liberal 
pecuniary contributions. 

April 14, 1879, at the annual election. Rev. Dr. Shelton pre- 
siding, C. W. Evans and W. H. Walker were elected wardens, and 
John Pease, Dr. A. R. Davidson, L. C. Woodruff, G. S. Hazard, A. P. 
Thompson, M. B. Moore and Cyrus Clarke, vestrymen ;* William Y. 
Warren was appointed clerk, and J. W. Sanford treasurer. 

May 12, 1879, the estimated receipts of the parish being much less 
than the proposed expenditures, the vestry fixed the salary of the rector 
at $1,000 and the associate rector at $2,500 for the year, from April i, 
1879, to April I, 1880, and for the music appropriated $1,500 per 
annum ; but it was subsequently agreed that the salary of the associate 
rector be fixed at $3,000, if satisfactory to him, instead of the $4,000 
as was appropriated on March 30, 1878. 



* This election resulted in a tie for the position of eighth vestryman between 
Messrs. Howard H. Baker and Sheldon T. Viele. By mutual agreement, a new 
election was not held to vote off this tie, and the vestry consequently continued 
throughout the year with seven vestrymen instead of eight. 



124 History of St. Paul's Church. 

July 10, 1879, t'^s vestry resolved, that as on the nth of September, 
1S79, the Rev. Dr. Shelton would have completed the 50th year of 
his services as rector, it was fitting that such an unusual event in 
the annals of the church in the United States should be marked by 
some suitable action on the part of the parish ; a committee was 
appointed to take such steps as were suitable to the proper observance 
of the anniversary. A communication was received from the Rev. S. 
H. Gurteen declining to accept a less salary than $4,000 per annum. 
The vestry resolved that a mortgage of $1,500 be executed on the 
rectory, in order to pay Mr. Gurteen the $4,000 per annum, and Mr. 
Gurteen agreed on his part to accept $2,500 for the year from April i, 
1879, to April I, 1880. 

In a communication from Mr. George Alfred Stringer, to the 
"Church Kalendar," it is stated that the "fiftieth anniversary of the 
Rev. Dr. Shelton's pastorate was a memorable occasion. Among the 
dignitaries of the church present were the Rt. Rev. A. Cleveland Coxe, 
Bishop of the Diocese ; the Rt. Rev. John C. Talbot, Bishop of Indiana ; 
the Rt. Rev. Dr. Fuller, Lord Bishop of Niagara, Ont., and others. 
It was on this occasion that Dr. Shelton withdrew from the active 
pastorate of the church. During the week that followed several not- 
able gatherings were held, all commemorative of his half century of 
service in St. Paul's parish. At a ministers' meeting, composed of 
thirty Buffalo clergymen of different denominations, formal con- 
gratulations addressed to Dr. Shelton were adopted. A reception 
was held at the rectory, September 15 th, at which the Guild of St. 
Paul's Church presented Dr. Shelton with a large portrait of himself, 
painted by Mr. Sellstedt, Dr. A. R. Davidson making the presentation 
address. 

. . . . "On this occasion the Rev. Dr. Shelton preached a 
sermon, in the course of which he said : — ' Our good predecessors 
reared this parish when opulence, as it is now seen, had no existence 
here. The costly vehicles which now fill our streets, the palatial houses 
of our merchants, were then unknown. They lived, if not in houses 




THE R?:\'EREXD DOCTOR SIIELT(.)X, IN HIS Sodi \"EAR. 

Presented by Sl. Paul's Guild to Dr. Shelton in 1879, on the Fiftieth Anniversary 

:.>f his Rectorate ; bequeathed by him to St. Paul's, and 

now in the Pari sli House. (See page 124. ) 



From the Painting by L, <i Sellstedt, N. A., 1877 



History of St. Paul's Church. 125 

of hewn logs of the forest, yet in habitations which would now be 
eschewed. And as late as my own day the natives of the forest had 
their houses upon the borders of the village, and some of them, with 
their chiefs and great men, were often seen in our streets.' — Great 
must have been the contrast to the venerable rector, as he stood on 
that proud day in the pulpit of the beautiful church, whose building 
was a large part of his life-work, and looked down upon the large and 
attentive congregation. Great was the contrast and great was his 
gratitude, as he looked back to the slender beginning, when he 
preached his first sermon in the old frame church of St. Paul's to the 
forty-five families who then constituted the parish. His name and 
work are indissolubly connected with the entire history of the city of 
Buffalo." Dr. Shelton was that year chosen a delegate to the General 
Convention. 

December 30, 1879, it was reported to the vestry that Mr. Henry 
Kip had paid over the funds in his hands to be applied to the payment 
of the mortgage debt on the German Mission Church, and the thanks 
of the vestry were thereupon tendered to Mr. Kip. 



1880. 

The majority of the vestries of 1877, 1878 and 1879 were in favor 
of the measures advocated by the Rev. S. H. Gurteen, the assistant 
minister, but it was not fully known what all those measures really 
were. One of them, however, was quite revolutionary in its character, 
which was to have an associate rector — two rectors instead of 
one, two heads of the parish instead of one — and on March 30, 
1878, the vestry actually passed the measure, and, to make it 
legal and binding, procured an act to be passed by the Legislature of 
the State of New York in 1878 ratifying and confirming the same. 
Mr. Walker, the junior warden, took legal advice on the subject 
and found that such an act could be set aside by the Court. 



126 History of St. Paul's Church. 

There was a quiet but strong opposition in the congregation to 
Mr. Gurteen and his adherents, and at the annual election of 
wardens and vestrymen on Easter Monday, March 29, 1880, quite 
a large number of the voters assembled in the church edifice. Dr. 
Shelton, as the rector, presided at the meeting, and appointed tellers 
to receive and count the votes. The result of the election was a 
complete triumph of the conservative element in the congregation, 
and effectually silenced those opposed to Dr. Shelton. There were 135 
votes cast, much larger in number than ever before. The average 
majority was about 90, and the following persons were elected : Charles 
W. Evans and William H. Walker, wardens ; John Pease, A. Porter 
Thompson, Albert J. Barnard, Dr. A. R. Davidson, Henry R. Rowland, 
George A. Stringer, Howard H. Baker and Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, 
vestrymen. William Y. Warren was appointed clerk, and James W. 
Sanford treasurer. 

At a meeting of the vestry, April 3, 1880, the resolutions formerly 
passed constituting the Rev; S. H. Gurteen an assistant rector and 
associate rector, were revoked, rescinded and annulled, and it was 
resolved that all connection of the Rev. S. H. Gurteen with St. Paul's 
Church and parish "be and the same is wholly terminated and ended." 

May 6, 1880, William Y. Warren having resigned as clerk of the 
vestry, Theodore F. Welch was appointed to that office. 

The Rev. Dr. Shelton recommended the Rev. Charles L. Hutchins to 
be the associate minister of the parish, and the vestry approved of his 
nomination. June 29, 1880, the Rev. Mr, Gurteen addressed a commu- 
nication to the vestry, stating that he had accepted a call to Trinity 
Church, Toledo, Ohio, and resigned his office as associate rector of 
St. Paul's Church, from and after September i, i88o. This communi- 
cation was laid on the table. The Rev. Mr. Hutchins declined the 
position of associate minister. The Rev. J. W. Craig was invited to 
the position for three months, but illness prevented his acceptance. 

July 29, 1880, the Rev. Mr. Douglass of Trinity Church, New York, 
was invited to be the assistant minister of St. Paul's Church, but 



History of St. Paul's Church. 127 

declined. September 9, 1880, the Rev. Dr. Shelton stated to the vestry 
that he had before determined to do away with the intoning of the 
prayers in the church services, but that he had found that the children 
had become very much attached to the service as it was, and in view of 
all the circumstances he deemed it wise not to make any changes against 
the wishes of a great many, as would be the case. He said he would 
have no objection to the chanting of the Creed, the Psalms, the Glorias 
and the Amen, but he thought the intoning of the prayers might be 
dispensed with. However, under the circumstances, he would with- 
draw all opposition from that time to the service as now conducted in 
that respect. 

It was resolved by the vestry that the interests of the church and 
the interests of the Sunday-School required the efficient maintenance 
of a full choral service. v 

1881. 

January 11, 1881, the Rev. Dr. Shelton called the vestry together 
and communicated to them his resignation as the rector of the parish, 
in the following letter read by him : 

Buffalo, January 11, 1881. 

I have asked you as a vestry to meet me this evening that I might resign the posi- 
tion I have so long held as rector of St. Paul's Church. 

I do this from a sense of duty, considering that my day of usefulness, from age 
and infirmities, is essentially passed away. I wish to add that I consider you have 
borne with me in my great age longer than others would have done in this selfish and 
sordid age. But you will understand that I have not lost my interest in the parish 
nor with the individuals composing it. You will also bear in mind that I have no 
distrust, neither is there any wart of the affectionate regard which I have so long had 
for every one of you. It is simply because I am sure that I promote the best interests, 
the peace and happiness as well as prosperity of the congregation by the act I now 
perform. But it is quite impossible for me to free myself from a situation of such 
grave importance without grief and distress. 

My parish, which I now relinquish, has been to me my only care and the ceaseless 
object of interest for more than fifty-one years. It has always been a prosperous, 



128 History of St. Paul's Church. 

united and happy body of Christians. My many defects and infirmities have been 
borne with a uniform and Icindly forbearance, and it has been at all times generous, 
kind and considerate. 

I need not say that I have steadily inculcated the great and grand doctrines of the 
Christian religion according to the Catholic or universal teachings of the Church as 
expressed in her creeds, in her liturgy and in her history. Private opinion has had no 
weight. 

The changing opinions and views, both of doctrines and practice of others, have 
not been followed, because I have believed the Church to be supreme and infinitely 
above all novelties, both in practice and in doctrine. 

You have ever heard this great and fundamental truth, that God made and fash- 
ioned and gave authority, as well as all truth which is necessary to salvation, to the 
Church, as He did to the movements of the heavenly bodies, which He first formed and 
then put in motion and gave them laws which were to last as long as they had being. 

I need not say that I have cherished these views sacredly, believing in them not- 
withstanding \j^ denials, the errors, the confusion of the religious world, all of which 
would come to an end if these views were adopted. I do not desire to express my 
great humility, which is felt when I look upon the errors and mistakes of a long life 
now soon to end. But I wish to say that your indulgence, and that of those who have 
gone before you, have had much to do with the prosperity and harmony of the church, 
both in the past and the present. 

I must trust that God will pardon what has been done so imperfectly, considering 
that He has intrusted so many and great and sacred duties to earthen vessels. 

Without intending to go more minutely into all that can be said, I respectfully 
subscribe myself as your old and long-tried friend. 

WILLIAM SHELTON. 

The reading of the letter called forth many strong and earnest 
expressions of love and affection to the Doctor, and the following 
resolutions were unanimously adopted : 

Whereas, The Rev. William Shelton, D, D., has, in consequence of advandiiig 
years and the infirmities of age, presented to the vestry his resignation of the rector- 
ship of St. Paul's Church ; therefore, 

Resolved, That we receive this announcement with profound sorrow, but we 
recognize in it the same devotion to the church and to the parish which has always 
characterized the action of our revered pastor and friend. 

Resolved, That in accepting this resignation we do so with the earnest hope and 
wish that Dr. Shelton, as honorary rector of the parish, will remain with us so long 




THE RE\'HREi\D DOCTOR SHELTON IN THE CHANCEL OF ST. PAUL'S. 
February, i3Si, in his 3.;d year. 

From a photograpli b> I{ McMichael. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 129 

as life shall last. That he will continue to occupy the rectory endeared to him, to his 
family and to ourselves, by so many sacred associations — that he will go in and out 
among us, dispensing the holy offices of religion as health and strength may permit. 

Resolved, That we wish to express, however feebly and imperfectly, our apprecia- 
tion of the great ability, the noble and generous conduct, aud, above all, the Christian 
faith and earnestness, as well as the marvelous fidelity to the poor, the sick, and 
the afflicted, which for more than fifty years have been exemplified by the Rev. Dr. 
Shelton in this parish. Whenever any effort was to be made involving self-sacrifice, 
he has always led the way with a courage and liberality which have ensured success. 
By the vestry and the congregation these qualities and these sacrifices can never be 
forgotten. They will remain the chiefest treasures we possess, and they will leave an 
impression upon this parish which will not be effaced. 

Resolved, That the clerk of the vestry and other proper officers of St. Paul's 
parish be and are hereby instructed to execute to the Rev. Dr. Shelton a life lease of 
the rectory. 

Resolved, That no clergyman shall be called to the rectorship of this parish with- 
out the free and hearty concurrence and consent of the Rev. Dr. Shelton. 

The following letter was addressed to the Rev. Dr. Shelton by 
the Bishop of Western New York : 

See-House, Buffalo, January 12, 1881. 
My Dear Dr. Shelton : — 

On reaching home this morning I learned of your resignation, and read the inter- 
esting correspondence in " The Express." 

It is a correspondence highly creditable to all concerned. On your part, you 
retire, prompted only by your own anxieties for the welfare of your beloved St. Paul's, 
in view of abated physical strength ; but every word of your letter is vigorous proof 
of an intellect unimpaired, and rings with the characteristic tone of your life-long 
testimony for Christ and His Church. I thank you for such a letter ; it will be read 
throughout the land, by churchmen generally, with feelings of honorable pride in a 
rectorship extended through half a century, and laid down with such dignity, while yet 
there is promise of years of remaining usefulness among those who have grown up 
under your pastoral care. 

And on the part of your people, what a testimony to your fidelity and to their 
appreciation of your life and character ! I was pleased with their tribute to your spirit 
of devotion to the IVIaster. That you are still to be with them ; still to be seen in 
your place a pastor and priest ; still to reside in the rectory, going in and out among 
a whole community that delight to do you honor : all this deprives the event of the 
pang inseparable from such changes as involve seeing the face of a friend no more. 



130 History of St. Paul's Church. 

And I thank God, in these days of fickle fashions and caprices, that to St. Paul's 
parish will ever belong the credit of such a protracted record. More than fifty years, 
and only one rector ! Six-and-thirty periods like this would reach back to the days of 
the Apostles. May every blessing attend the residue of your ministry and your life. 
Accept my assurance that I count it an honor to subscribe myself. 

Rev. and dear sir, your friend and diocesan. 

To Rev. Db. Sheltc, Etc. A CLEVELAND COXE. 

The following editorial appeared in the Buffalo Courier of January 

12, 1881 : 

THE RETIRACY OF DR. SH ELTON. 

" Rev. Wm. Shelton, D. D., the veteran rector of St. Paul's, retires from his charge 
after having officiated in the same pulpit for fifty-one; years ; and the love and esteem 
of his parishioners and all others who know him follow him into retiracy. His 
advanced age entitles him to the rest he has for some years sought. As a minister of 
the gospel and a man, he has met his obligations faithfully and well. A man of great 
physical and mental stamina ; strong willed, independent and aggressive ; broad and 
liberal in his views, he has always been known alike for his fearlessness and honesty 
and his devotion to his church. He has fought the battle of life with rare courage — 
but few men have ever been better equipped for it ; and he lays down his armor like 
a true soldier, conscious that he has never dishonored his cause. In the history of 
the city he has been a grand old landmark, which, once removed, can never be 
replaced ; but he is with us still, in good health, and in the full possession of his 
faculties ; and that he may be spared to us these many years, is our sincerest wish." 

April 12, 1881, at a meeting of the vestry, it was stated that the 
parish owed a floating debt. It was resolved that $1,200 be paid to 
the Rev. Dr. Ingersoll for his officiating in the church services for the 
past year. The wardens reported that the Rev. Mr. Gurteen had sued 
the parish for $625 for past services, but it was contended that nothing 
was due him, and the suit was not prosecuted. 

April 18, 1881, at the annual election, Charles W. Evans and William 
H. Walker were elected wardens, and John Pease, A. Porter Thompson, 
A. J. Barnard, Dr. A. R. Davidson, George A. Stringer, Henry R. 
Rowland, Howard H. Baker and Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, vestrymen ; 
Theodore F. Welch was appointed clerk, and James W. Sanford 
treasurer. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



131 



June 25, 1881, the committee appointed in 1878 to ascertain the then 
indebtedness of the parish and to obtain subscriptions for the payment 
therefor, reported to the vestry that there was due at Easter, 1878 : 



To the Rev. Dr. Shelton, for arrears of salary, 
To the mortgage on the parsonage, .... 
Other indebtedness, ... 



• $5, 237.95 
. 4,700.00 
. 2,488.27 

$12,426.22 



The committee reported that subscriptions had been made to pay 
the same, as follows : 



Rev. Dr. Shelton 


$5,000.00 


Cyrus Clarke Vandeventer 


$100.00 


William H. Walker, . . 


1,000.00 


M. Powers Fillmore, . . 100.00 


Charles W. Evans, . . . 


500.00 


G. A. Hibbard, . . . 


100.00 


A. Porter Thompson, . . . 


500.00 


Wm. Meadows, . 






100.00 


G. S. Hazard 


500.00 


F. W. Scott, . . 






100.00 


S. G. Cornell, . . 


500.00 


Esther M. Squier, 






100.00 


L. C. Woodruff 


500.00 


G. A. Stringer, . 






100.00 


J. L. Kimberly 


250.00 


Mrs. G. F. Lee, . 






75-00 


George N. Burwell 


200.00 


Frank Kimberly, . 






50.00 


George E. Hayes, 


200.00 


Gertrude S. Talcott, 






50.00 


Mrs. G. H. Bryant, . . . 


200.00 


Agnes Squier, 






50.00 


In memory of Carlos Cobb, by 




I. R. Brayton, . 






50.00 


his daughter, 


200.00 


John Pease, 






50.CO 


LEEtitia P. Viele, . 


200.00 


A. R. Davidson, 






50.00 


Agnes Warren, 


150.00 


James Sweeney, . 






50.00 


The Misses Kimberly, . . 


150.00 


J. C. Nagel, . . 






50.00 


Andrew Brown, . . . 


125.00 


H. R. Howland, 






50.00 


Cyrus Clarke 


100.00 


E. L. Kimberly, . 






25.00 


J. F. Demarest, . . . 


100.00 


E. S. Warren, . 






25.00 


William H. Glenny, Jr., 


100.00 


Daniel Penfield, . 






25.00 


George Meacham 


100.00 


C. G. Curtiss, . . 






25.00 


M. B. Moore, . . . 


100.00 


C. M. Howe, . . 






25.00 


G. A. Scroggs, . . . 


100.00 


0. B. Howe, . . 






25.00 


T. Guilford Smith 


100.00 


Howard H. Baker, 






25.00 


H. R. Hopkins 


100.00 


Mrs. J. L. Talcott, 






25.00 


Sheldon T. Viele, . . 


100.00 


Henry Bull, . . 






25.00 


William K. Allen, . . . 


100.00 


Mrs. J. G. Guenther 


, 




25.00 



132 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



Mary E. Walker, . 


$25.00 


Stephen Walker, . 




16. 25 


Edward Dows, . . . 


20.00 


Mrs. Brent, 




5.00 


M. S. Burns, . 


15.00 


T. D. Sheridan, . . 




5.00 


C. K. Remington, . . . 


15.88 


William Johnson, 




5.00 


S. L. Porter, 


15.00 


Miss H. M. Abel, . 




5-00 


Sanford C. McKnight, 


10.00 


Mary A. Coit, 




5.00 


William Savage, . 


10.00 


W. Y. Warren, . . 




3.00 


Mrs. B. F. Smith, . 


10.00 


J. M. Haight, 
Total, . . 




3-75 




$12 


,808.88 


Collection, Easter, 1878, . . 








119.93 




1881, on 


above indebtedness, . . 


Total collected, up to June 25, 


$12 


,928.81 



The committee reported that they had paid all of the above indebt- 
edness of $12,426.22, and several small items, and in addition had paid 
$490 on the principal of the new $1,500 mortgage, which had been 
placed by the vestry on the rectory since the organization of the 
committee, leaving a present indebtedness on the said mortgage of 
$1,010. 

Mrs. Eliza Hamilton, widow of Henry Hamilton, and one of the 
oldest residents of Buffalo, died in October, 1881, in the seventy- 
seventh year of her age. Henry Hamilton was one of the vestry, and 
also one of the wardens of St. Paul's, and died in September, 1852, 
aged fifty-five. Benjamin B. Hamilton of Buffalo, and Claude Hamilton 
of San Francisco, and Caroline, widow of the late Frank E. Coit, sur- 
vived their mother. Mrs. Hamilton was a parishioner of St. Paul's for 
nearly sixty years. 

October 29, 1881, the vestry resolved to tender a call to the Rev. 
Chauncy C. Williams of Augusta, Georgia, to be the rector of St. 
Paul's Church, at a salary of $4,000 and an allowance of $500 for the 
expenses of his removal to Buffalo. 

December 3, 1881, the vestry agreed to have a platform placed in 
part of the chancel, and to extend the chancel floor so as to accommo- 
date the surpliced choir. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 133 

1882. 

January 7, 1882, the committee reported that the Rev. Mr. WilUams 
had visited the parish, and that he had been generally liked, but had 
declined the call for the reason that his wife's health rendered it 
necessary to remain in a warm climate. 

In the latter part of January, 1882, the vestry called the Rev. John 
W. Brown, D. D., the then rector of Trinity Church in Cleveland, Ohio, 
to the rectorship of St. Paul's, Buffalo. He had visited Buffalo and 
preached in St. Paul's on Sunday, January 30, 1881, and was very 
acceptable to the congregation, but his people in Cleveland were very 
unwilling to have him leave that city. Under certain circumstances, 
as improved parish accommodations, he concluded to remain with 
them, but subsequently these improvements were not made. 

At a meeting of the vestry, February 1 1, 1882, the committee having 
in charge the selection of a new rector, reported that they had visited 
Detroit, and were pleased with the Rev. Dr. Worthington of that city. 
He accepted their invitation to visit St. Paul's in Buffalo, and officiated 
and preached one Sunday, but gave no encouragement that he would 
accept a call, as influential members of his own congregation wished 
him to remain in Detroit. He was afterwards elected Bishop of the 
Diocese of Nebraska. 

Mr. Wm. H. Walker of the Finance Committee stated to the vestry 
that, including the mortgage on the rectory, the parish would be in 
debt at Easter, 1882, only in about the sum of $1,400, and that $600 
was already pledged towards paying this sum, provided the entire 
amount were raised by Easter. 

February, 1882, $500 — bequest for a memorial window in the 
Sunday School — was paid to the vestry, by the executor of Mrs. 
Elizabeth Staats Seymour. 

Some years previous to her making the bequest, a Sunday-School 
building separate from the church was contemplated, and a consider- 



134 History of St. Paul's Church. 

able sum was provided for it ; but the project was finally abandoned 
and the money was used in fitting up the basement room under 
the church as a chapel and Sunday-School room. On the receipt 
of Mrs. Seymour's bequest, which was paid by her executor in February, 
1882, the room was much enlarged at an expense of more than $2,500, 
and made to communicate by a stairway with the interior of the church ; 
an additional window was cut in the northerly end of the stone founda- 
tion on Erie Street, and in it was placed the memorial window to the 
deceased sons of Mrs. Seymour. The window not only beautified the 
chapel and Sunday School, but was also very useful for light and 
ventilation. The vestry passed a resolution on February 11, 1882, 
of its desire to put on record its appreciation of the gift from one 
who was for many years an honored and beloved member of the 
parish. 

The Rev. Dr. Courtland Whitehead of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 
having received an informal call to the rectorship, visited and offici- 
ated at St. Paul's Church on Sunday, February 27, 1882. His ser- 
mon was very acceptable to the congregation, but, after giving the 
subject mature deliberation, he declined the position. He was after- 
wards elected Bishop of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and removed to 
that city. 

Dr. George E. Hayes, formerly one of the vestry, and a liberal 
contributor to the building of the church edifice, died in April, 1882, 
at the age of seventy-eight. He was one of the oldest members of St. 
Paul's Church, having come to Buffalo in 1829. He was twice 
married, his last wife surviving him. Harriet, his daughter by his first 
wife, married the Rev. Charles H. Smith, Rector of St. James' Church, 
Buffalo. 

At the meeting of the vestry, April i, 1882, held at the resi- 
dence of William H. Walker, on Pearl Street, a communication 
was received from Mr. Charles G. Curtiss, making a memorial gift 
in memory of his deceased wife, the late Amelia Lent Curtiss, 
of a polished brass Litany desk. The vestry accepted it with 



History of St. Paul's Church. 135 

thanks, and directed it to be placed in its appropriate place near 
the chancel.* 

At the same meeting of the vestry, on April i, 1882, Mr. Walker 
stated that the revenue of the parish was very nearly $6,000, and that 
the committee having in charge the selection of a rector, had again 
visited Cleveland for the purpose of consulting the Rev. Dr. Brown. 
After a full consultation with him the result was that he expressed his 
willingness to accept a call to the rectorship of St. Paul's parish ; that 
thereupon they tendered him a call, on March 31, 1882, his salary to 
be $6,000 per year, and that he had accepted the call. The vestry 
unanimously confirmed the action of Messrs. William H. Walker and 
Albert J. Barnard, composing the said committee. 

The Rev. John W. Brown, D. D., was born in Baltimore, Md., July 
7, 1837. The following short biography of him was published in one 
of the Buffalo papers : 

" His father was a prominent citizen of the ' Monumental City,' and was for many 
years identified with its public interests, Dr, Brown received his early education in 
the schools of his native city, and afterwards pursued his studies at Dickinson Semi- 
nary, Williamsport, Pa. He graduated from this institution after completing the 
scientific course, having prepared himself for the profession of civil engineer, which 
calling he followed for several years. His inclinations, however, prompted him to 
return to the seminary and take up a course of Divinity. He first entered the Metho- 
dist ministry, where he remained for a short time, until his convictions led him to take 
orders in the Episcopal Church, which were given him by the late Bishop Whitting- 
ham of Maryland. His first parish was St. Ann's, Middletown, Del., where he 
was advanced to the priesthood. Thereafter, he was successively rector of parishes in 
Philadelphia, Detroit and Cleveland. He accepted a call to the rectorship of St. 
Paul's Church, Buffalo, in May, 1882, where his eloquence has since drawn large and 
devout congregations. Dr. Brown has always shown strong musical inclinations, and 
commenced his education in that art under Prof. Stoddart of Baltimore. Since that 
time he has continued his studies in this direction, devoting himself, however, more 
especially to church music. He was one of the founders of the Detroit Vocal Society, 
and afterwards president of the Cleveland Vocal Society, which, under his administra- 
tion, held its first May Festival about five years ago." 



* This memorial was destroyed with the church, May 10, 18 



136 History of St. Paul's Church. 

The Rev. Dr. Brown entered on the duties of his office, as 
rector of St. Paul's, on the fourth Sunday after Easter, May 7, 1882. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 10, 1882, William 
H. Walker presiding, the following persons were elected : Charles 
W. Evans and William H. Walker, wardens, and Messrs. John Pease, 
A. Porter Thompson, Howard H. Baker, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, Dr. 
A. R. Davidson, Henry R. Howland, George A. Stringer and Albert J. 
Barnard, vestrymen. 

At a subsequent meeting on April 2 2d, Theodore F. Welch was 
appointed clerk, and J. W. Sanford treasurer. The wardens reported 
that they had executed a life lease of the rectory, on Pearl Street to 
the Rev. Dr. Shelton. The vestry approved of their action. The 
treasurer reported that the sum of $286 had been received during the 
past year from the use of the receiving vault in the basement of the 
church, for the burial of the dead. William H. Walker, one of the 
wardens, reported to the vestry that no indebtedness of any kind 
existed on the church property, which had not been the case for a 
period of more than twenty-five years. 

At a meeting of the vestry, held at the residence of the Rev. Dr. 
Brown, the rector. No. 686 on the west side of Main Street, south of 
and near Tupper Street, on June 3, 1882, the finance committee 
reported that the estimated receipts for the year ending Easter, 1883, 
were : From pew rents, $7,500 ; parish fund collections on Sundays, 
$400 ; probable receipts from the receiving vault for the dead in the 
church basement, $700 — in all, $8, 600 ; and that the estimated expen- 
ditures were : The rector's .salary, $6,000 ; music, $2,500 ; sexton, 
$475 ; fuel, $275 ; insurance, $375 ; water and gas bills, $250 ; taxes, 
$200; incidental and other items, $710 — in all, $10,785 ; leaving a 
deficiency of $2,185, which would have to be provided for by con- 
tributions. 

The Rev. Dr. Brown, the rector, called the attention of the vestry 
to the necessity that as soon as possible the parish should have a 
suitable rectory. A committee, consisting of Messrs. Walker, Barnard 




THE REVEREND JOHN 
Rector of St. Paul's, May 7, 



\V. BROWN, 
882. to June I, 



D. D. 



From a crayon drawing; made in 1888, by 
Mrs. I'erscli von Ehrenbcrg. Now at the 
Parish House. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 137 

and Hopkins, reported favorably, but after considerable delay the 
further consideration of the plan was indefinitely postponed and, early 
in 1883, the Rev. Dr. Brown purchased for himself the residence, No. 
568, on the east side of Delaware Avenue, north of and near Allen 
Street, and removed to it in May, 1883. 

June 3, 1882, it was resolved that the rector be requested to convey 
to the Rev. Dr. Ingersoll and the Rev. Mr. Bielby the thanks of 
the vestry for their services in St. Paul's Church during the vacancy in 
the rectorship, and also to convey to the Rev. Mr. Jones their thanks 
for his services. 

At a meeting of the vestry on September 13, 1882, it was unani- 
mously resolved that the following minutes be recorded, and that a 
copy be sent to the Rev. Dr. Shelton : 

" The death of Mrs. Lucretia Stanley Shelton, the estimable wife 
of the honorary rector of this parish, who for more than half a 
century was its beloved pastor, merits from the vestry an especial 
recognition that she has been associated with St. Paul's parish from 
its beginning, and has ever been known as one of its most valu- 
able and devoted members. In her most exemplary life she fully 
illustrated and confirmed the power and reality of our holy 
religion ; her devotion to duty in all the ways of the Church, 
her gentleness, her unceasing benevolence, her generous hospitality, 
her forgetfulness of self for the welfare of others, with the other 
notable traits which adorned her Christian character, offered us an 
example most worthy to be followed. With this tribute of high 
esteem to the memory of one departed, we send our loving sympathy 
to the Rev. Dr. Shelton in his sore bereavement, and do assure 
him of our continued regard and affection, praying that divine 
strength and consolation may be granted to him during the closing 
years of his most useful and honored life." 

Lucretia Stanley was born in Geneva, N. Y., July 21, 1798. She 
first, married Stephen K. Grosvenor of Buffalo, N. Y. She was 



138 History of St. Paul's Church. 

married to the Rev. William Shelton, D. D., April 7, 1845. Mrs. 
Shelton died at the Rectory on Pearl Street, Buffalo, after a long and 
painful illness, September 6, 1882. 

1883. 

February 8, 1883, the vestry adopted suitable resolutions on the 
occasion of the sudden death of the Rev. Edward Ingersoll, D. D., for 
many years the rector of Trinity Church, Buffalo, and who served St. 
Paul's Church as minister in charge for more than two years during 
the vacancy in the rectorship. He died very suddenly, at eight o'clock 
in the evening of February 6th, in the parlor of the Church Home on 
Rhode Island Street, where he was a frequent visitor. 

The resolutions of St. Paul's vestry were as follows: 

" The Rev. Edward Ingersoll, D. D., now called to his rest, having 
served this parish as minister in charge for more than two years, dur- 
ing the vacancy of the rectorship, we hereby place on our records the 
following minute as a tribute to his memory : — 

" In the death of the Rev. Dr. Ingersoll, the Church suffers the loss 
of one of her most excellent and devoted priests, who was remarked 
for the loveliness of his Christian character by all who knew him. He 
was truly a man of God. 

"In his associations with St. Paul's Church we recall his kindly inter- 
est in her welfare and the quiet dignity of his presence among us. He 
was ever ready to discharge all the duties of his sacred office with sin- 
cerest fidelity, and his ministrations were most acceptable. He also 
endeared himself to the members of the parish by his long and 
intimate friendship with the beloved honorary rector, the Rev. Dr. 
Shelton." 

Dr. Ingersoll was born in New Haven, Connecticut, November 26, 
1810 ; graduated from Yale College in 1831, and received the degree 
of D. D. from Hobart College in 1856. He came to Trinity Church, 



PLAN OF ST. PAUL'S, 
And names of pew holders in 1883, 



Compiled from drawings, photo- 
irraohs. and records by G. H. B. 




History of St. Paul's Church. 139 

Buffalo, in 1844, succeeding in the rectorship the Rev. Dr. Hawkes, 
who was afterwards Bishop of Missouri. Dr. Ingersoll was rector of 
Trinity Church for a period of thirty years. Upon his retiracy from 
Trinity Church in 1874 he was for about two years in charge of St. 
Peter's Church, Niagara Falls ; returning to Buffalo, he was elected 
rector emeritus of Trinity Church, and for some three years prior to his 
death he acted as chaplain of the Church Home. He was married at 
New Haven in 1836, to Catharine F. Seymour, daughter of Gordon 
Seymour. Mrs. Ingersoll died many years ago, but several sons sur- 
vived Dr. Ingersoll. 

Samuel G. Cornell died February 5, 1883. He was for many years 
connected with St. Paul's parish, and he was a member of the vestry 
from 1855 to 1857, again from 1863 until 1869, and in 1872 ; junior 
warden in 1870 and 1873, and one of the building committee of 1867 
for the completion of the church edifice. He was also a trustee and a 
liberal supporter of Hobart College, Geneva, and was in many direc- 
tions a representative man. 

Mr. Cornell was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., July 28, 1808, and came 
to Buffalo in 1852. He was one of the founders and president of the 
Cornell Lead Company, which had, for many years, its manufactory on 
the north east corner of Virginia Street and Delaware Avenue ; he 
resigned from the company in 1878, and lived for a time in New York 
City. Returning to Buffalo, he died February 5, 1883, at the home of 
his son, Mr. S. Douglas Cornell. In 1838, Mr. Cornell married Sarah, 
daughter of Major David B. Douglas, U. S. A., and grand-daughter of 
Andrew EUicott of West Point, the first surveyor-general of the United 
States. Mrs. Cornell died in 1877. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, March 26, 1883, the Rev. 
John W. Brown, D. D., rector, presiding, the following persons were 
elected : Charles W. Evans and William H. Walker, wardens ; John 
Pease, A. Porter Thompson, Howard H. Baker, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, 
Dr. A. R. Davidson, Henry R. Howland, George A. Stringer and Albert 
J. Barnard, vestrymen. 



I40 History of St. Paul's Church. 

March 31, 1S83, T. F. Welch was appointed clerk, and J. W. 
Sanford treasurer. Hobart Weed, Edward C. Walker and Henry R. 
Hopkins were appointed the music committee. The treasurer's annual 
report and the report of the finance committee showed that all the 
obligations of the parish had been met, and that there was no debt of 
any kind. A tax of twenty per cent, was levied on the sold pews to 
defray the parish expenses for the ensuing year. 

Russell H. Heywood, for many years the senior warden of St. Paul's 
Church, and a prominent resident of Buffalo, died at his residence near 
Sandusky, Ohio, in July, 1883, in the eighty-sixth year of his age. He 
was born near Worcester, Mass., September 20, 1797, and subsequently 
moved to Paris Hill, Oneida County, N. Y.,'and there married Sarah 
Wicks in 1824. He there first became identified with the Episcopal 
Church, and soon after removed to Buffalo and became an active mem- 
ber of St. Paul's Church. He was elected vestryman, afterwards junior 
warden, and subsequently senior warden. In 1829, he erected a 
spacious residence, with extensive grounds, near what is now the corner 
of Seneca and Wells streets, and resided there for some fifty years, 
until his removal to Ohio. His wife, Sarah, died in 1840, leaving him 
three sons and two daughters ; but his daughter Sarah, the wife 
of President Folwell, of the University of Minnesota, was the only 
one of the five children who survived him. Mr. Heywood married his 
second wife, Harriet King, in 1846. She was the sister-in-law of the 
Rev. Dr. Hale, pres'ident of Hobart College, Geneva, N. Y., and 
died some two years previous to the death of her husband. Mr. 
Heywood was one of the largest contributors to the erection of the 
new church edifice of St. Paul's. His contributions exceeded $7,000, 
and to him we are indebted for the beautiful black walnut which so 
enriches the interior of the edifice. In the obituary nptice of him it is 
stated that he was a large and cheerful giver in public and private 
charity. At Venice, Ohio, he erected a most beautiful little church, 
as a memorial to his deceased children and their mother. This church 
he gave to the Diocese of Ohio. It was also stated that he pursued his 



History of St. Paul's Church. 141 

business with ardor, but was never a slave to it. He possessed the 
rare ability to leave his business when he went to his house to be the 
friend and companion of his children. The gain of a fortune never 
greatly elated him, and the loss of one never for a moment ruffled his 
composed and resolute mind. His funeral took place from St. Paul's 
Church, Buffalo, on July 23, 1883, on which day the vestry adopted 
suitable resolutions as a memorial of his many services to the parish. 



H Brief Sl?etcb of St. Paul's Cburcb, Buffalo, iu 1883. 

From the " Church /Calendar" of July 14, i88j,* 

" The organization of the parish of St Paul's Church toolc place at the house of 
Elias Ransom, in the then village of Buffalo, February 10, 1817. The Rev. Samuel 
Johnston, a missionary of the church for all the country west of the Genesee River, 
officiated on the occasion. The certificate of incorporation was signed by him and 
by George Badger and Jacob A. Barker. 

Messrs. Erastus Granger and Isaac Q. Leake were the first wardens, and Messrs. 
Samuel Tupper, Sheldon Thompson, Elias Ransom, John G. Camp, Henry M. Camp- 
bell, John S. Lamed, Jonas Harrison and Dr. Josiah Trowbridge were the first 
vestrymen. 

The church edifice, a handsome frame building, was built in the Gothic style in 
1 8 19, on the lot given to the parish by the Holland Land Company, bounded by 
Main, Erie, Pearl and Church streets, and cost $5,000. It was enlarged in 1828, at 
an expense of $2,500. The enlarged building was 78 feet in length, 44 feet in width, 
and 24 feet in height to the square, and the height of the tower was 40 feet from the 
square. The Holland Land Company also gave to the parish, in 1826, one hundred 
acres of land near the lower village of Black Rock, which was sold by the vestry in 
1844, and the proceeds of the sale applied to the purchase of the lot on Pearl 
Street, on which St. Paul's rectory was built in 1846, at a cost of $8,000. 

The first settled missionary pastor of the parish was the Rev. William A. Clark, 
in 1819 and 1820. He was succeeded by the Rev. Deodatus Bibcock from 1820 to 
1824, and the Rev. Addison Searle, from 1824 to 1828. The Rev. Reverard 
Kearney, in 1828, was followed by the Rev. William Shelton, who preached his first 
sermon, as rector, in the church on September 13, 1829. He was the first rector of 
the parish who received no support from the missionary fund, and faithfully served 
in St. Paul's for more than fifty years. 

* This article was written for the Kalendar by the late Charles W. Evans. 



142 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Under his auspices the present stone church edifice was erected, in 1851. It is 
situated on the lot bounded by Erie, Church and Pearl streets. The lot is triangular 
in shape, the apex towards Main Street, and the edifice is cruciform, with the excep- 
tion of there being no south transept. Such is the beauty of the design, having an 
entrance from each of the three streets, that, seen from any point, the part presented 
to the view appears to be the front. 

The greatest length of the edifice is 175 feet, and the greatest width 94 feet. It 
is divided as follows ; Nave, interior, length 84 feet, width 59 feet ; transept, length 
49 feet, width 28 feet ; chancel, length 28 feet, width 24 feet ; vestry-room, length 
14 feet, width 12 feet. The tower, at the junction of Erie and Pearl streets, is of the 
following dimensions : Exterior length 40 feet ; width, 39 feet ; and the interior is 13 
feet square. The entire height from the base line to the spire cross is about 274 feet, 
being but little, if any, less than that of Trinity Church, New York. 

The church possesses a fine chime of ten bells, in the large tower, and a single bell 
in the small tower, costing in all about $5,000. The spire is octagon, and there are 
large louver windows in the belfry, eighteen feet high to the apex of the arches. 
The smaller tower, on Church Street, is of the following dimensions : Base, 16 feet 
square ; height of the tower section, 76 feet ; and of the spire, 32 feet. 

The walls of the chancel end are 43 feet, from the base line to the top of the 
cornice, and to the apex, 67 feet ; on the Erie Street front 41 feet, and on Pearl 
Street 40 feet. The nave is 53 feet high on both sides, and to the extreme of the 
apex, 72 feet. The chancel window is a Gothic lancet-triplet, 28 feet wide and 39 
feet to the apex of the arch, and is filled with fine, stained glass. The roof is 
an open timbered one of beautiful design, supported by two rows of large Gothic 
columns. The windows are all of the lancet form, filled with stained glass. In the 
basement is a Sunday-School room, also used as a chapel, with the entrance from 
Pearl Street ; and in another part is a receiving vault for the dead. The exterior 
of the wall is laid with Medina red stone, and the interior with limestone and 
rubble work. The walls in some places are thickly overgrown with luxuriant, creep- 
ing ivy. 

The interior walls are decorated with genuine fresco work, the design being 
burnt in on wet plaster, a method of work very uncommon, as yet, in the United 
States. The sittings accommodate about 1,200 persons, and the furniture through- 
out is of solid black walnut. The chancel stalls are massive and richly carved, 
with Gothic canopies and finials. The reredos, also of carved walnut, is beautifully 
decorated in gold and colors. St. Paul's is regarded as the Cathedral Church of 
the diocese, and contains the bishop's chair, which faces the nave at the entrance to 
the chancel ; it is similar to the stalls in design and workmanship, although on a 
larger scale. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 143 

Among the different gifts to the church is a beautiful eagle lectern, of polished 
wrought brass and a memorial Litany desk, also of brass. The church has two fine 
organs, made by Hook & Hastings of Boston ; the larger one, in the organ loft at the 
west end of the nave, is used for the chorus choir at the morning service ; and the 
smaller one, in the chancel, furnishes the music for the surpliced choir at the afternoon 
service. The organ loft will accommodate a full orchestra and a chorus of sixty 
voices, and the beautiful rendering of the music, especially at the high festivals of 
the church, is well known. 

The foundation was commenced September 3, 1849. The corner-stone was laid 
by Bishop De Lancey, June 12, 1850, and the edifice was consecrated by him, October 
22, 1851, but was not fully completed until about the year 1873. 

It has cost something over $160,000, but this sum represents only a part of what 
the cost of such an edifice would be at the present time. 

The whole work may be justly considered as a fitting monument to the untiring 
perseverance, zeal and industry of the Rev. Dr. Shelton, the rector, who witnessed 
the laying of the first foundation stone, the laying of the last stone on the tall spire of 
the main tower and the erection of the gilded cross thereon. The style of the archi- 
tecture is early English Gothic ; the architect was the late Richard Upjohn, Sr. The 
structure has justly been called " Upjohn's Masterpiece," and is considered one of the 
finest specimens of Gothic architecture in the United States, the spire of the main 
tower being especially remarkable for its grace and symmetry. 

Dr. Shelton resigned the rectorship of St. Paul's, and was made honorary rector, 
January 11, 1881 ; he was succeeded by the Rev. John W. Brown, D. D., who was 
elected by the vestry April i, 1882, and assumed the duties of his office May 7, 
1882. St. Paul's parish is entirely free from debt." 



At a special meeting of the vestry, at the residence of William H. 
Walker, on October 11, 1883, in the absence of the rector, Charles W. 
Evans, senior warden, took the chair, and stated that the meeting had 
been called for the purpose of taking suitable action on the occasion of 
the death of the honorary rector, the Rev. Dr. Shelton, who died in 
Bridgeport, Conn., on Thursday, October 11, 1883, quietly amid the 
scenes of his earliest childhood, and surrounded by a few of his 
nearest relatives, in the old homestead in which he was born, over 
eighty- five years ago. The following preamble and resolutions were 



144 History of St. Paul's Church. 

offered, and, on motion, unanimously adopted. They were prepared 
by Mr. Stringer, one of the vestry : 

Whereas, By the decease of the Rev. William Shelton, D. D., honorary rector of 
St. Paul's Church, we, in the Providence of God, are deprived of one who for more 
than fifty years was the rector of this parish, and who was ever foremost in promoting 
its welfare, 

The rector, wardens and vestry not only sharing the common grief, but lament- 
ing their own peculiar loss, desire to record their high estimate of his life ; and do, 
therefore, 

Resolve, First, that in the death of our revered and life long friend, the Rev. Wil- 
liam Shelton, D. D., we mourn a character of high Christian excellence, of exalted 
nobleness and purity, of sterling honor, of self-sacrificing generosity, of unflinching 
courage, of singular affectionateness, and of a rare and tender constancy. 

Springing naturally from such a character was his preeminent fearlessness in preach- 
ing and advocating the principles of the Church, in whose doctrines, worship, polity, 
and apostolical constitution he most thoroughly believed, so that we can most truly 
say that his trumpet gave no uncertain sound. 

So evident was his spirit of habitual and earnest prayerfulness to those who were 
blessed with his intimate friendship that it seemed to them that he always felt the 
presence of God at all times and in all places. 

The loving and gentle elements were so closely woven with his bolder and stronger 
traits that while he upheld and strengthened with his counsel he never failed to sympa- 
thize with his heart. 

His life was given to the parish of St, Paul's, and the strong cords of affection 
which united him to it were interwoven with the very fibers of his being, and for its 
welfare he was willing to sacrifice his all. 

He was always first in the alleviation of suffering, always the most sympathizing 
of friends, and people in every walk of life looked upon him with veneration. 

In the character thus fully rounded and well balanced there was a native grandeur 
and strength of manhood, self -consecrated to God, which gave us the noble life of a 
man true and faithful to the end. 

Resolved, Therefore, secondly, that we tender to the immediate relatives of the 
late Dr. Shelton the assurance of our profound and affectionate sympathy ; that a copy 
of these resolutions be transmitted to them, and that they be recorded on the register 
of the parish, and also be published in the city and church papers. 

The remains of the late rector were brought from Bridgeport to 
Buffalo, being met at Batavia by a committee of the vestry, who 



History of St. Paul's Church. 145 

escorted them to the old rectory on Pearl Street, on October 12th, 
while the bells of St. Paul's were tolled. 

The remains lay in state in the chancel of the church from 10 until 
4 o'clock on Saturday, October 13th. During the six hours nearly 
3,000 people looked upon his face ; the largest attendance was at 
noon, but during the entire time the average was about 400 an hour 
— a fact that tells more eloquently than words of the love and esteem 
in which the venerable rector was held by his own people and the citi- 
zens at large. 

About half past nine o'clock Dr. H. R. Hopkins, Dr. A. R. David- 
son, Messrs. J. V. Carr, M. S. Burns, H. R. Howland, S. G. Walker 
and H. H. Baker bore the casket from the rectory on Pearl Street to 
the chancel of the church, where it was deposited on the bier. Clothed 
in full ecclesiastical robes of white, the face wearing a calm and life- 
like expression, the remains lay in a massive casket of English oak, 
highly polished but without ornamentation, the handles of polished 
brass. The heavy cover, beveled into the shape of a cross, and bearing 
a polished brass plate with this inscription : 

REV. WILLIAM SHELTON, D. D. 

FOR 52 YEARS 
RECTOR OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, 

Born September 11, 1798, 
Died October 11, 1883, 

was removed and placed at one side, affording a full-length view of 
the body. 

The following members of the Guild composed the guard of honor 
in charge of the remains while lying in state: From 10 to 12 — 
Messrs. A. Porter Thompson, Samuel G. Walker, Millard S. Burns, 
Thomas G. Perkins, James Sweeney and John V. Carr. From 12 to 
2 — Messrs. George J. Sicard, Sheldon T. Viele, O. H. P. Champlin, 
William Y. Warren and Dr. M. D. Mann. From 2 to 4 — Messrs. 
Howard H. Baker, Stephen Walker, D. C. Godwin and Dr. G. Hunter 
Bartlett. 



146 History of St. Paul's Church. 

At quarter past 4 o'clock the remains were borne from the church 
to the rectory by the following gentlemen : Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, 
D. C. Godwin, S. G. Walker, Howard H. Baker, Henry R. Howland, 
G. Hunter Bartlett and Stephen Walker. 

The following is from a communication published in the " Kalen- 
dar," contributed by Mr. G. A. Stringer : 

From 10 A. M. to 4 P. M. of Saturday, October 13th, the remains lay in state in 
the church, upon a purple bier, upon which loving hands had strewn palms and flowers, 
symbolical of victory over sin and death, and of the life and glory of the resurrection. 
The form of the venerable clergyman, majestic even in death, was clothed in ecclesi- 
astical robes, his countenance tranquil with "the depicted triumph of the soul after 
victory." During this time a guard of honor was in attendance, and the body was 
viewed by over three thousand people. 

Dr. Shelton loved the poor ; he sought, pitied and comforted them, and while he 
taught them he relieved their material wants. Widespread were his acts of mercy, 
and by no means limited to those within the pale of his own communion. His ear 
was ever open to the story of suffering, and, like his blessed Master, he went about 
doing good. In the beautiful words of his successor, the Rev. Dr. Brown, beloved 
by him, beloved by us his care and charge: " Had you seen yesterday the throng of 
mourners who passed through the aisles of the church, to have one last look on the 
serene, upturned face, as he lay so still and calm in his chancel, you would have noted 
the scant garment, the home-spun dress, the care-worn face, which spoke of a loving 
gratitude to him as benefactor and friend." 

On Sunday afternoon, October 14th, at half past two, the bells sent forth a sor- 
rowful peal, and the casket of solid English oak, the top of which was beveled into 
the form of a cross, was carried from the rectory. The Rev. Dr. Brown, with nine 
of the Episcopal clergy of the city and vicinity, awaited it at the entrance of the 
church, with the surpliced choir of fifty-two boys and twelve men. Preceded by 
these the melancholy procession entered the house of God, while from the great organ 
came the mournful strains of Beethoven's "Funeral March." The faithful physicians 
of the reverend deceased followed the clergy, then came the wardens, then the casket, 
borne by the members of the vestry, and last of all came the mourners. As the 
solemn words, " I am the resurrection and the life, saith the Lord," fell upon the 
ears of the hushed and waiting throng, the sacred burden was borne through the 
central aisle and deposited upon the bier in front of the altar rails. The services 
were most impressively rendered, the Rev, Archdeacon McMurray of Niagara, Ont., 
the life-long friend of the Rev. Dr. Shelton, reading the lesson. The sermon of the 



History of St. Paul's Church. 147 

Rev. Dr. Brown, from the text, " Herein is that saying true, One soweth and an- 
other reapeth," was an eloquent tribute to the memory of his venerable predecessor. 

After the singing of the inspired words, " I know that my Redeemer liveth, and 
that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth," the services at the church closed 
with the hymns " Nearer, my God, to Thee " and " The Strife is O'er." Then, pre- 
ceded by the clergy and chorus choir, the casket was borne through the church. The 
door reached, the surpliced choir and the clergy formed a long line on either side of 
the steps, and waited with bowed heads while the sons of the church carried from it 
the lifeless form of him who was for half a century its faithful rector. 

The last sad rites were performed over the open grave, at Forest Lawn Cemetery, 
in which peaceful spot all that was mortal of the Rev. Dr. Shelton was laid by the 
side of his beloved wife, Mrs. Lucretia Stanley Shelton, who passed away the 6th of 
September, 1882. 

Sadly those who loved the departed in life looked upon the fresh mound, covered 

with white flowers, and then, with heavy hearts, turned silently away. 

" Far out of sight, while sorrows still enfold us, 
Lies the fair country where our hearts abide ; 
And of its bliss is naught more wondrous told us, 
Then these few words, 'I shall be satisfied.' " 

The following extracts are from the close of the sermon preached 
by the rector, the Rev. John W. Brown, t). D., at the funeral of Dr. 
Shelton : 

"Duty was not a word of sentiment with the aged priest, but an im- 
perative command, and in the vigor of his manhood was the inspiration to action and 
zealous work for the Master. In defence it made him as adamant. For progress it 
was synonymous with endurance. The early struggles of the parish, of which he him- 
self has spoken in his semi-centennial sermon, tell us of this invincibility of purpose 

to work out the design of his life in the fear of God The energy and 

positiveness which characterized the outer life, in relation to the well-being of this 
parish, found also its synonym in the faith once delivered to the Saints, which he up- 
held in such undoubted constancy as against the ephemeral opinions of the day and 
the skeptical tendencies of the age. It required a strong faith to plant the Church in 
this village in its untutored childhood ; and it required as strong a faith to uphold the 
truth as it is in Christ, amid cultured and educated infidelity. On the faith of the 
Church, and in the Church, he built his own character, and sought to form the charac- 
ters committed to his priestly and pastoral care. The pastorate of half a century with- 
out this would not have left to-day, when death ends it, this which we now so richly 
enjoy. And I am bold to avow, with the thought of human infirmity which belongs 
to us all, that to this, the prominent trait in the character of our sleeping father, we 



148 History of St. Paul's Church. 

owe more than to aught else the inheritance of his success. Strong in this he was 
strong in God, and never faltered in his trust in the Lord God Almighty. 

" But I would speak yet more intimately of our dear father. Underneath the vig- 
orous grasp of a strong friendship was all the tenderness of a womanly sympathy — 
and none felt more the touch of human sorrow than he. He reminded me of the 
strong tree whose mighty trunk held itself erect against every beating storm in winter, 
only to shelter the tender-budded fruit to bless mankind when its leaves would fall in 
autumn. His benevolence was no garland of praise with him. His very sternness 
seemed to rebuke thanksgiving, and served to cover in the sweet budding benevolence 
of his large heart of charity. Oh, friends, you know not what secret streams of loving, 
tender sympathy flowed out from the spirit under this rock character, which carried 
refreshment to the weary and relief to the poor ! .... So would I speak of his 
simplicity — which as a child spake honest words, and knew no guile ; of his simple 
faith, which trusted as strongly as it believed ; of his humility, which would sit at the 
feet of a teacher to learn heavenly wisdom. I knew him somewhat as no one else 
could know him in these pastoral relations — and to-day the faces of the patient In- 
gersoU and the believing Shelton come to me in an holy remembrance, as I recall them 
in that heavenly Communion which preceded the translation of the former almost from 
the sick-bed of the latter. Thus I knew him, and when sore-smitten with illness, and 
death seemed near approaching, he found inexpressible joy in that holy Sacrament, and 
peacefully awaited the coming of the messenger. 

' ' The warrior has hung his implements of warfare on the walls of his house, and 
life's battle is over. He has fought the good fight, and we enter on the glories of his 

victories The traveler has ended his journey, and has laid him down to 

rest, for he has finished his course Let us catch the refrain from that 

splendid life, and seek to have its tones of right and duty make an holy harmony with- 
in our souls. " . . 

Dr. Shelton's will was duly admitted to probate by the Surro- 
gate of Erie County, N. Y. His personal estate was inventoried at 
$52,000, and his real estate was valued at $30,000. It is remarkable 
that he should have accumulated such a large estate,* considering that 
his salary from St. Paul's Church was never a large one, and that he 
was a liberal giver to many church objects, and often loaned sums of 
money, quite large in the aggregate, but which were not repaid. He 
was by no means close in his household expenses, and entertained 
much company, particularly the clergy. While he was liberal, he was 
* See note at foot of page 82. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 149 

never extravagant. He said in his will that he humbly gave hearty 
and grateful acknowledgments to the great Almighty Author of his 
being, who, most unexpectedly and without effort or seeking of his 
own, and, as it were, by a miracle of His providence, bestowed upon 
him the property he possessed. He bequeathed to his wife f4,ooo, 
which was included in his estate, but which he had received 
from her in an annuity belonging to her. He also bequeathed to Miss 
Elizabeth McKee, the faithful, trusty and much regarded person, who 
for more than thirty years had been the conscientious and invalu- 
able housekeeper of his wife and himself, $7,000, and says he did 
this in testimony of his thorough respect for her irreproachable 
conduct and character, for her invaluable and skillful services during 
the period of so many years. He bequeathed to one of his nieces and 
to the widow of one of his brothers, the homestead and parsonage in 
the town of Bridgeport, Conn., which was used by his father, and in 
which his father lived for forty years, and the land adjoining, being 
some nineteen acres. It was to this old-fashioned homestead that 
Dr. Shelton made a pilgrimage nearly every summer. There he was 
born, and on it he expended large sums of money. He left Buffalo 
for this place, the last time, July 23, 1883, and died there October 11, 
1883. Dr. Shelton bequeathed large sums to his kinsmen, to col- 
leges,* to church institutions and to personal friends. He bequeathed 
$4,000 to his own beloved St. Paul's Church, to be used by the vestry 
at its own discretion, and $2,000, the interest of which was to be used in 
ringing and chiming the bells. In his will he says he appoints his two 
long honored and trusted friends, Charles W. Evans and William H. 
Walker, executors of his last will and testament, and left them $1,000 
in trust to erect in St. Paul's Church a memorial to his good wife. 

* It may be of interest to state that Dr. Shelton received his Doctorate degree from 
Hobart College in 1838 ; in 1843 he was elected a Trustee of Hobart College, and 
continued to act in that office until the time of his death. In 1S25. while temporarily 
located at Red Hook, N. Y., he received the honorary degree of Master of Arts from 
Columbia College, New York City. He was graduated from the General Theolog- 
ical Seminary in the class of 1823. 



150 History of St. Paul's Church. 

They determined to pay the amount towards the proposed new altar. 
He also left them $1,000 for a suitable monument over the 
graves of himself and wife. In 1887, the executors erected over each 
grave substantial horizontal tombs with suitable inscriptions — over his 
grave, commemorating his birth and death, and the duration of his 
rectorship of St. Paul's ; and over her's, the day of her birth, July 21, 
1798, and of her death, September 6, 1882. They also erected a tomb- 
stone over the grave of Daniel Wadsworth Lewis, born in 1766, and 
died in 1837. He was the uncle of Mrs. Shelton, and the guardian of 
her younger years, and was a prominent and consistent churchman in 
Western New York, and occasionally read the church service for 
Dr. Shelton. The three graves are in the lot in Forest Lawn Cemetery 
in Buffalo, originally purchased by Dr. Shelton. 

The executors made their final accounting of Dr. Shelton's estate 
to the Surrogate of Erie County in Buffalo, N. Y., in October, 1886, 
and he decreed their commissions to be nearly $800, which sum 
was paid to them out of the assets of the estate ; they, however, con- 
tributed more than that amount to the memorial window in the chancel 
and to other parish purposes. 

November 10, 1883, the vestry placed the former rectory on Pearl 
Street, in charge of the Rev. Dr. Brown and the wardens. 

The following extracts are from the sermon preached in St. Paul's 
Cathedral on All Saints' Day, November i, 1883, to commemorate the 
life and services of the Rev. William Shelton, D. D., by the Rt. Rev. 
A. Cleveland Coxe, D. D., Bishop of Western New York. It is taken 
from the memorial volume printed in 1883 :* 

. . "There was something in his nature wholly unostentatious and at war 

with display, yet he valued the good will of his neighbors and prized very justly their 

esteem. His downright common sense accepted the maxim — 

" An honest man's the noblest work of God.'* — 

and that is what he aimed to be. He was accused of a certain roughness of demeanor ; 

enemies might even call it rudeness ; his friends credited it, with reason, to his manly 

* The memorial volume above referred to, was compiled, with most affectionate care, by Mr. 
George Alfred Stringer, one of the vestry, under the direction of the vestry, in 1883. It coniains, 
in addition to Bishop Coxe's sermon, extracts from which are given above, the full text of Dr. 



History of St. Paul 's Churcli. 1 5 1 

frankness, his sincere outspoken truthfulness, his utter lack of artifices and of the 
finesse that conceals the real motives of the moment. By friends he was often com- 
pared with the great Dr. Johnson in this respect, nor was the comparison wholly fan- 
ciful. Of that grand old man of letters he was a great admirer ; he fully sympathized 
with his habits of thought, and he made many of Dr. Johnson's maxims his own. 
And his natural instincts resembled those of that conscientious moralist, of whom it 
has been said so truly : ' Men have cut him up and turned him inside out, but in him 
is found no lie.' Just such another, in this particular, was our venerated Shelton. 
If at times he uttered some rough word, he was prompt to take it back, and in mak- 
ing amends he was most noble. I have seen the tear start in his eye when I have 
ventured to say, 'Doctor, you have hurt that young brother's feelings.' All who 
knew him intimately know well how he could overcome even his strongest prejudices 
when once convinced that they were not just. His prejudices were, it is true, charac- 
teristic and very strong. Like Dr. Johnson, he was ' a good hater ; ' but when he was 
warned not to hate men, but only their vices and meanness, he would warmly respond : 
' Oh, God forbid ! I would not do any man an injury for all the world.' Softened 
by time and suffering, these kindly elements grew riper and more marked as he drew 
near the heavenly gates, till at last he seemed to be ' in perfect charity with the 
world,' to forgive and forget if he had been injured, and to be deeply sorry if he had 
misjudged. Such were his infirmities then, but they were nobler than some men's polite- 
ness. He never fawned before a man's face and then stabbed him in the back. But, 
as it is said that the world can better put up with a flattering rogue than with ' a 
plain, blunt man,' I have often thought that these peculiarities furnish a test of his 
real greatness. They could not have been tolerated unless more than balanced by 
conspicuous merits. They were such as would have been fatal to the success in life 
of almost any other man. There is something grand in the character which, in spite 
of them, attracted such friendships, commanded such universal respect, and which for 
fifty years retained the strong unwavering attachment and devotion of his parishioners. 
To their credit, they rightly estimated the man who gave his life to their holiest 
interests. And they knew the other side. His dignified features, his noble form and 
bearing, his somewhat stern expression melting away very often into a smile of extra- 
ordinary sweetness and even childlike simplicity, were all associated with something 
that belonged to Homer's heroes — his 'Kings of Men.' . . . This honorable 
integrity was rendered yet more conspicuous by his large-hearted beneficence. I 
never supposed him to be a wealthy man, and yet I was often amazed when accident 
revealed to me his private acts of munificence, some of them hardly to be expected 

Brown^s fine sermon preached at the funeral, resolutions of the vestry, St. Paul's Guild, the stand- 
ing committee of the diocese, and the Deanery of Buffalo, and much valuable and interesting 
information concerning ttie life and work of the late rector. 



152 History of St. PauVs Church. 

even from the most affluent. In this he was memorably an example to his flock. To 
the poor he was a father indeed. Down into the foul cellar and up the creaking stair- 
way he went ' seeking goodly pearls' — seeking to save souls ; and this he did, caring 
also for the bodies and for all the wants of the poor. ' In bestowing he was princely." 
Once or twice I remonstrated with him on his almost indiscriminate bounty. Then he 
said something like this : ' God has been good to me ; I never sought to be rich, nor 
practiced arts of gain, but somehow there has come to me more than I ever dreamed 
of possessing ; I ought to give accordingly.' . . . His competency was the 
source, to him, of quiet comfort, such as any good man may enjoy without vulgar 
pride of purse. He congratulated himself that he was not likely to become dependent. 
' I can go,' he said, 'to my old home in Connecticut if I find myself no longer useful, 
and end my days there in peace.' But he clung to life with a strong desire to be 
useful to the last. And so he was, for to the last day of his residence in Buffalo he 
ministered to the poor, and baptized their babes, and gave them bread. . . . 

," You gray-haired men, who knew him longest and best, feel, at this moment, that 
he is with you, and will be ever enshrined in your hearts till they cease to beat. You 
that are younger and have shared his later anxieties and toils, have proved through all 
these last scenes of tender and filial duty how truly he lives in your warmest affec- 
tions. Your children that gazed upon his face in the coffin, and that saw thou- 
sands crowding for a last look at the man of God, that solemn day of his burial, 
can never forget him ; and they, to their children, will tell of the old pastor who taught 
them the creed, so that yet another fifty years shall find his name almost as fresh 
as it is to-day. The man of God is with us still, not only because this noble church is 
his monument ; not only because, when the passing stranger looks up to the cross upon 
that heaven- pointing spire, he will be told who built it — but because he has built 
living stones into the temple of his Master ; because these are his enduring record ; 
because on these tablets of the heart he has written the name of his Redeemer, and so 
immortalized his own." 

1884. 

January 11, 1884, the finance committee reported that the parish 
had borrowed $2,000 to meet the expenses of fitting up the Sunday- 
School room in the basement of the church. March 8, 1884, the com- 
mittee reported that the cost of fitting up and enlarging the Sunday- 
School room, including carpets, new seats and other furniture, had 
been $2,617.96. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 153 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 14, 1884, Charles 
W. Evans and William H. Walker were elected wardens, and John 
Pease, A. Porter Thompson, James R. Smith, Henry R. Hopkins, 
A. R. Davidson, Robert P. Wilson, George A. Stringer and Albert J. 
Barnard, vestrymen ; and at a meeting of the vestry on May 2, 1884, 
T. F. Welch was appointed clerk, and J. W. Sanford treasurer, and 
the usual tax of twenty per cent, was levied on the pews. 

July 5, 1884, the vestry placed the rectory on Pearl Street in the 
possession of St. Paul's Church Guild, to be known as the Guild 
House, the vestry to resume possession whenever they might deem it in 
the interest of the parish to do so. It was understood that the family 
of the sexton might still live in the portion then occupied by them. 

John L. Kimberly died December 21, 1884, in the eighty-sixth year 
of his age. He was connected with Sheldon Thompson in business, 
and with him was one of the earliest parishioners of St. Paul's Church. 
Mr. Kimberly was born in Derby, Conn., January 20, 1799, and came 
to Black Rock in 1817, and in 1826 married Miss Eliza A. Hawley of 
that place, whom he survived some twenty-one years. Mr. Kimberly 
lived within the limits of what is now the City of Buffalo nearly seventy- 
five years. He was a life-long and attached friend of the late Dr. 
Shelton, and during the building of the church edifice was a vestry- 
man and one of the building committee, and a liberal contributor to its 
erection. His sons and daughters were all parishioners, and were all 
useful and efificient in parish work. One of his daughters, Miss Lucy 
Kimberly, married the late DeWitt C. Weed, and his youngest daughter. 
Miss Edith Kimberly, became Mrs. William H. Walker. 



1885. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 6, 1885, the Rev. 
Dr. Brown, the rector, presiding, Charles W. Evans and William H. 
Walker were elected wardens, and John Pease, A. Porter Thompson, 



154 History of St. Paul's Church. 

James R. Smith, A. R. Davidson, Henry R. Hopkins, George A. 
Stringer, Robert P. Wilson and Albert J. Barnard, vestrymen ; and on 
May I, 1885, the vestry appointed G. F. Hunter Bartlett clerk, and 
James W. Sanford treasurer. The bequest of $1,000, by the late 
James D. Sheppard to St. Paul's Church, was accepted by the vestry, 
the income to be used for charitable purposes, under the direction of 
the rector, wardens and vestrymen. The thanks of the vestry were 
tendered to Theodore F. Welch for his able and faithful services for 
the past five years as clerk of the vestry. The thanks of the vestry were 
also extended to Mr. Tucker, then about to leave the city, for his effi- 
cient and long-continued services in ringing the bells for the past 
twenty-five years. The treasurer reported that $35 1 had been received 
for the past year from the use of the receiving vault, and the money 
was appropriated for the use of the Sunday School. July 10, 1885, Mr. 
Walker, from the committee, reported that the $1,000, bequeathed by 
the late James D. Sheppard, and froo, accrued interest on it, had been 
deposited in the Merchants' Bank to the credit of the treasurer of the 
parish, at four per cent, interest. 

September 12, 1885, Charles W. Evans, as one of the executors, 
reported that the $4,000 and $2,000 bequests of the late William 
Shelton to St. Paul's Church, had been deposited in the Merchants' 
Bank in Buffalo, at four per cent, interest. December i8th, the 
vestry resolved that the memorial window to the late Dr. Shelton be 
placed in the chancel, and that the rector and wardens be a com- 
mittee to have the work accomplished. The memorial windows were 
thereupon ordered by the committee, and the entire cost of them 
was paid by the voluntary contributions of the many friends of the 
late rector. 

The rector reported that he had appointed Henry R. Howland 
superintendent, and William A. Joyce assistant superintendent of the 
Sunday School, and Dr. M. D. Mann to conduct the Bible class. 

During the year 1885 the Common Council of the City of Buffalo 
ordered that no more interments of the dead should be made in any 



3 




History of St. Paul's Church. 155 

of the receiving vaults attached to any church in the city, as they 
were injurious to the health of the living ; consequently, the receiving 
vault of St. Paul's was no longer used for the dead. 



1886. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 26, 1886, Rev. Dr. 
Brown, rector, presiding, Charles VV. Evans and William H. Walker 
were elected wardens, and John Pease, A. Porter Thompson, James R. 
Smith, A. R. Davidson, Henry R. Hopkins, George A. Stringer, Robert 
P. Wilson and Albert J. Barnard, vestrymen. 

May 14, 1886, the vestry reappointed G. Hunter Bartlett clerk, 
and James W. Sanford treasurer. The treasurer reported that the 
receipts for the year ending Easter, 1886, were $11,185; disburse- 
ments, f 1 1,100 ; receipts from the receiving vault, $133, appropriated 
to the use of the Sunday School. 

The vestry appropriated $2,000 from the bequest of the late 
Rev. Dr. Shelton, the said appropriation to be used for the pur- 
pose of repointing the church edifice, and for restoring the broken 
stone crosses and finials, and putting the water conductors from the 
roof in good order, the work to be done under the superintendence of 
the wardens. The whole of the said work was accordingly done, and 
was of much benefit to the preservation and improved appearance of 
the edifice, which is such a lasting monument to the beneficence of our 
former rector. It was proposed to sell the German Mission property 
on Spruce Street, and to invest the proceeds in establishing a Mission 
Church on Richmond Avenue ; but after mature consideration the 
plan was abandoned, and subsequently the services in the German 
Mission were fully resumed, under the name of St. Andrew's Mission 
Church, under the charge of the Rev. Mr. Brent, one of the assistant 
ministers of St. Paul's Church, occasionally assisted by the Rev. Dr. 
Brown and the Rev. Mr. Huske. 



156 History of St, Paul's Church. 



1887. 

At a meeting of the vestry on February 8, 1887, the rector stated 
that he had signed the form of oath required by the United States 
Custom House Department for the free entry of the new windows for 
the church, in memory of the Rev. Dr. Shelton, from Cox Sons, Buckley 
& Co., in England, and that the windows would soon be in Buffalo. 

Dr. Hopkins from the committee reported that he had secured sub- 
scriptions to the amount of f 1,100 to pay the salary of the Rev. Mr. 
Huske, as assistant minister and for other parish purposes. 

The three beautiful windows, to fill the lancet-triplet over the 
altar, in the chancel of St. Paul's, being the memorial to the late Rev. 
Dr. Shelton, were made by Cox Sons, Buckley & Co., of London, 
arrived in Buffalo in March, 1887, and were placed in position by 
Mr. Cox. They remained veiled until Easter Sunday, April 10, 1887, 
on which day the parishioners looked upon them with much pleasure. 

The window on the north represents the conversion of St. Paul on 
his journey to Damascus. A light is shining down from heaven upon 
the blindness of the apostle. At the base is the inscription, " Saul, 
Saul, why persecutest thou me?" and under this "In Memoriam." 

The centre window is the largest of the three, and depicts St. Paul 
standing on Mars Hill surrounded by the people of Athens, to whom 
he is preaching of Christ. At the base is written : " God that made 
the world, He is Lord of heaven and earth. He giveth to all life and 
breath," and underneath "William Shelton, D. D., Rector." 

The south window shows St. Paul at his trial before Festus. At its 
base is the inscription " Speak forth the words of truth and soberness," 
and under this "From 1828 to 1882." 

The two side windows in the chancel, facing Erie Street and the one 
looking out on Church Street are also new and beautiful. The artists 
have finely blended the colors and the rays which come through the 
glass will throw a soft light over theentire chancel which, when finished, 




THE FIRST SHELTON MEMORIAL WINDOWS AT ST. PAUL'S, 

The Reverend Doctor Brown in the Chancel, Easter Monday, 1887. 

These windows were unveiled at Easter, 18S7, and destroyed in the fire of i8>3. (See page 156.) 



From a composite plioto^raph liy E, !■" 
Hall and G. H. B. 



History of St. Paul's Church: 157 

will be one of the handsomest in the country. The floor will be of 
marble ; the walls are to be retinted and a new altar will take the place 
of the one now in use. 

At the annual election on Easter Monday, April 11, 1887, the Rev. 
Dr. Brown, rector, presiding, Charles W. Evans and William H. Walker 
were elected wardens, and John Pease, A. Porter Thompson, James R. 
Smith, A. R. Davidson, Henry R. Hopkins, George A. Stringer, Robert 
P. Wilson and Albert J. Barnard, vestrymen. At a subsequent meeting 
of the vestry G. Hunter Bartlett was re-appointed clerk, and James W. 
San ford treasurer. 

Margaret Louise Smith, wife of Judge James M. Smith, died in 
Edinburgh, Scotland, on July 24, r887, while traveling with her 
family. She was buried from the residence of her husband in Buffalo, 
August 18, 1887. For many years she was much engaged in parish 
duties in Trinity Church, and latterly in St. Paul's, and was an efficient 
manager in the Home for the Friendless, and also in the Church 
Home. At the Convention of the Diocese of Western New York in 
September, 1887, Bishop Coxe, in his annual address, referred to her 
decease in affectionate terms, and in conclusion said, " Long will 
she be remembered by her fellow Christians as one who nobly bore 
her part in every effort in Christian charity and beneficence, and who 
was endeared to the inner circle of her more intimate friends by those 
graces of true womanhood which shrink from publicity, and court only 
the hearts and homage of those whom God has made the immediate 
partakers of its love in the sphere of private duty." She was survived 
by her husband, her daughter, Mrs. Robert P. Wilson, and her soft, 
Philip S. Smith. 

On the October anniversaries of the death of the Rev. Dr. Shelton, 
it was customary for the Rev. Dr. Brown to call the attention of 
the congregation to memorials of him, sometimes by reading portions 
of his sermons preached many years before, but yet applicable to the 
present time, and also by instituting an annual October collection to 
contribute a fund for the future support of the parish, and also by 



158 History of St. Paitt's Church. 

collecting funds to make every window in the church a memorial, 
and by substituting memorial stone columns for the wooden ones. 
It was under the auspices of Dr. Brown that the very appropriate 
chancel windows were placed in position on Easter Sunday, 1887, 
commemorating the rectorship of Dr. Shelton from 1829 to 1883. 
The annual October collections for an endowment fund now amount 
to nearly $425, and the Shelton Memorial Society, composed of the 
younger women of the congregation, have raised a fund of more 
than $600. 

" The Altar and the Hearth " is the name of the St. Paul's parish 
paper, published mostly under the direction of the rector. The Octo- 
ber, 1887, number contains the annual report of the parish to the 
Diocesan Council, held in Buffalo in September, 1887, for the year 
ending September i, 1887, as follows : Families, 242 ; individuals not 
included in families, 75 ; communicants, 593 ; Sunday-School scholars, 
407 ; teachers, 47 ; number of scholars in the Sunday-School of St. 
Andrew's Chapel, the former German Mission, 150 ; teachers, 15 ; 
$20,963 were contributed for parish purposes, including $14,325 for 
current expenses, including salaries, and $3,000 for the memorial 
windows ; $1,130 for objects within the diocese, and $1,703 for 
objects exterior to the diocese ; in all, $23,797. Value of the church 
edifice and lot as estimated by the wardens, $200,000 ; Guild House 
and lot, $12,000; St. Andrew's Chapel, $4,000. Number of sittings 
in the church, 1,200. Daily services commenced September i, 1887. 

The following articles were published in the November (1887) 
number of the " Altar and Hearth," relative to the Sunday evening 
services in St. Paul's Church, Buffalo : 

" The evening service, to which attention is called in this paper, is intended for all 
sorts and conditions of men. Situated as the church is, in the heart of this large and 
growing city, with the street railways centering in such close proximity to it, with 
hundreds of people passing to and fro in full sight of it every Sunday evening, there 
is earnest hope of building up a people's service — free to all — a service which should 
attract by hearty, devout and beautiful music, and by the plain and earnest preaching 
of the Gospel of Christ, as the Church holds and teaches the same. Surely such a ser- 



History of St. Paul's Church. 159 

vice ought to be, under the direction of the Holy Spirit, a great power for good in 
this community ! St. Paul's parish will thus maintain four services every Sunday, and 
ample opportunity will be afforded to all to ' worship the Lord in the beauty of His 
holiness. ' 

"Zeal and devotion in church work must never be allowed to take the place of 
personal holiness. We can imagine a man or a woman thoroughly engrossed in 
Church work merely for its own sake — for the sake of seeing the Church grow and 
prosper in the community — taking = personal pride in the mere temporal advance- 
ment of the kingdom of Christ, without having the heart, the soul, the life conse- 
crated to Christ ; our Lord would have us first, and then our labors for His kingdom 
follow naturally. Self-consecration is the most important element in Church work. 
From personal holiness flow all the fruits of the Spirit. Celebrating, as we do at 
this time, the blessed Feast of All Saints, it becomes us to remember that they 
did most for Christ who were most in Christ. The closer our sacramental union 
with Christ, the more fruitful that union will be in earnest work for Christ and His 
kingdom. 

" Organized effort has been a mighty factor in the spread of Christ's kingdom in 
the world, and in enlarging the sphere of Church work. But isn't there to-day a 
danger of too many organizations ? Isn't it better to have a few good organizations, 
working on broad and liberal principles, than to have a vast number very limited in 
their fields and in their modes of operation ? Isn't there a danger, when there are so 
many organizations, of diverting the mind, nay, even the heart, from that one grand 
. organization which embraces them all — the Church ? It is only as the various mem- 
bers minister to the general welfare of the whole body that they are useful. If they 
live at the expense of the body without making any adequate return, they are worse 
than useless — they are positively harmful." 



/^^ 



lire. 1886. 




THE RUINS OF ST. PAUL'S FROM MAIN STREET. 
iSee pa^es 165 to 167,) 



From a photofjrai'h by E. F, Hall, taken on 
Uie day of the lire, May 10, i8B(<. 



Continuation of tbe 

Ibietor^ of St Ip^auUe Cburcb, 

Buffalo, m. 1^. 



1888 to 1903. 



WITH CHAPTERS ON : 

The Restored St. Paul's ; The Memorials ; The 
Ivy ; The Chimes of St. Paul's ; The Great 
Tower and Spire ; The Music, 1817-1903 ; Histor- 
ical Notes, 1817-1903; List of the Clergy, 1817- 
1903 ; List of the Vestry, 1817-1903 ; The Archi- 
tects OF St. Paul's ; Subscription Lists, Etc. 

BY 

ALICE M. EVANS BARTLETT 

AND 

G. HUNTER BARTLETT. 
1903. 



Continuation of tbe 

Ibistor^ ot St. ipaul's Cburcb, 

1888 to 1903. 



1888. 

At the annual parish election on Easter Monday, April 2, 1888, the 
following persons were chosen : Charles W. Evans and William H. 
Walker, wardens; John Pease, A. Porter Thompson, James R. Smith, 
Dr. A. R. Davidson, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, George Alfred Stringer, 
Robert P. Wilson and Albert J. Barnard, vestrymen. 

May I, 1888, G. Hunter Bartlett was re-elected clerk of the vestry, 
and James W. Sanford was re-elected treasurer of the parish. 

At the same meeting of the vestry, a letter, dated April 25, 1888, 
from the rector, the Rev. Dr. Brown, to the wardens and vestry, was 
read, in which he said : " I desire to make the first communication 
to you of the recent official action of St. Thomas's Church, New York 
City. The vestry of that parish on Monday evening accepted the 
resignation of their venerable rector and unanimously elected me to 
pe his successor. I accepted their invitation to assume the full charge 

163 



164 History of St. Paul's Church. 

on June ist next. This acceptance now compels my resignation of 
St. Paul's, which I now offer, to take effect on the above date. In 
resigning your parish and my work in Buffalo I need not assure you of 
the regret and pain which this separation causes me. My relations 
with you and the congregation have always been the most pleasant 
and harmonious, and I find that now when I must sever them that my 
attachment is even stronger than I supposed. I thank you for all your 
courtesy and friendship, and fervently pray that the good work shall 
still go on with God's blessing, and soon some one shall be found to 
succeed to what I have endeavored to found and develop in the Name 
and for the sake of Christ and the Church." .... 

In the resolutions of the vestry on the resignation of Dr. Brown it 
was said : " The Rev. Dr. Brown took charge of this parish six years 
ago, when the parish required great ability and great skill to strengthen 
and maintain it in the position it had so long held in the Diocese and 
in the Church. How well he has succeeded the present condition of 
the parish fully shows. During his administration the number of com- 
municants has largely increased, the services of the church have been 
multiplied, and its finances have been established on a solid basis, and 
in all respects the parish is in a state of harmony and of substantial 
prosperity. We also desire to place on record our appreciation of his 
great kindness to our former venerated rector, the Rev. Dr. Shelton, 
and of his generous fidelity to him and to his memory." . . . After 
offering the congratulations of the vestry to the rector on his call to St. 
Thomas's Church, the resolutions conclude : " That we tender to the 
Rev. Dr. Brown, and to his family, our most cordial wishes for their 
health and happiness in their new home.'' 

On motion, the rector appointed Messrs. W. H. Walker, Col. Bar- 
nard, A. P. Thompson, Dr. Hopkins and James R. Smith as a commit- 
tee to take action with reference to filling the vacancy in the office of 
rector of St. Paul's. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 165 



Ube Burntng of St. Paul's. 



" Our holy and our beautiful house, where our fathers praised Thee, is burned up 
with fire : And all our pleasant things are laid waste." 

— Isaiah, Ixiv., 11. 



On Thursday morning, May 10, 1888, Ascension Day, the church 
edifice was almost entirely destroyed by fire, the result of an explosion 
of natural gas used for heating the church. The explosion, which was 
caused by an unexpected increase in the pressure of gas in the main 
pipe, happened about nine o'clock in the morning — an hour or two later 
the church would have been filled with a crowd of worshippers at the 
Ascension Day service. At the same hour many natural gas meters 
were burst and several other fires broke out in different parts of the 
city, on account of the failure of the Natural Gas Company's appliances 
for regulating the pressure of the gas throughout the city. Almost 
immediately the large interior of the church was a mass of flame. 
The heavy black walnut doors on the Pearl Street and Erie Street sides 
of the church were blown from their fastenings and into the street by 
the force of the explosion, and volumes of smoke and flame poured 
forth. The fire department was early on the scene, but could do 
nothing to save the interior of the building. The firemen fought most 
bravely to save the main tower, pouring streams of water into it 
through the tall louvre windows. At noon the fire was under control, 
as far as the spire was concerned, and at twelve-thirty o'clock the 
chimes in the tower rang a triumphant peal, showing that they were 
not injured, and that the tower and spire were safe. Great throngs of 
people on all sides of the building watched the burning, and universal 
was the sorrow expressed at the loss to the city of the beautiful and 
historic church. The fire raged nearly the entire day, and was not 



1 66 History of St. Paul's Church. 

completely subdued until the roof had fallen in, and the interior and 
all that it contained had been entirely destroyed. The stone walls 
were left standing, but were greatly damaged in many places. The 
main tower, with the lofty and graceful stone spire, and the small 
tower were saved, but the " fire marks " on both towers still show 
how high and fierce were the flames. 

The following poem was printed in the Buffalo Express on the 
Sunday following the fire : 

ASCENSION DAY, 1888. 



{Suggested by the hymn rung from the belfry of 
St. PauPs at noontide.'] 

"Our Lord is risen from the dead ; " 
(O dauntless bells ! your message sweet 
Swells out through shuddering flame and heat 

And smoke that crowns your spire's head.) 

** Our Jesus is gone up on high^^' 
(Brave bells, your tongues their faith confess 
The nobler, stronger, in their stress, 

Like martyr spirits in their cry ) 

" The powers of hell are captive led," 
(What though within your ruined wal's 
An earthly temple fails and falls ? 

Its spirit rises from the dead.) 

' ' Dragged to the portals of the sky. " 
(O wounded bells ! Ascension Day ! 
Lift saddened hearts with you to pray 

And bring the eternal gates more nigh ) 

Buffalo, May loth. —Edith Eaton. 

The photographic reproductions, given in this volume, of the ruins 
of the church taken directly after the fire show better than any descrip- 



H 




History of St. Paul's Church. 167 

tion the complete destruction of the interior. The brass Altar Cross 
and the memorial Alms Basin (seepages 279, 291) were all that were 
saved of the beautiful appointments of the chancel ; the silver communion 
service — which dates back to the year 1825 — fortunately escaped 
injury, being in the safe at the Guild House. At the time of the fire, 
several of the choir boys and younger men of the parish, J. Clark 
Milsom and Robert Wilkinson, the sexton, especially, did good work, 
under the direction of Dr. Davidson and others, in removing the me- 
morials and other articles saved from the vestry room. It was impossible 
to enter the church after the fire broke out, but the closing of the door 
in the Erie Street porch leading to the tower-room, by H. S. HiUiard, 
immediately after the explosion, may have been a factor of some im- 
portance in the preservation of the main tower and spire. As will 
readily be seen, this doorway was a serious menace to the safety of the 
tower and chime. A simple precaution, and one worthy of consideration, 
would be to fit this opening — the only entrance to the tower — with a 
metal-clad, self-closing door, in place of the wooden one still in use. 

In the evening of the same day. May 10, 1888, a meeting of the 
vestry was held, and it was decided to take steps at once for the rebuild- 
ing of the church. A committee of seven was appointed to superintend 
the work. Colonel A. J. Barnard was elected as chairman of this com- 
mittee with power to appoint the other six members. He appointed 
Messrs. W. H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson, Dr. H. R. Hopkins, Robert 
P. Wilson, Geo. Alfred Stringer and James R. Smith. 

Dr. Davidson, Mr. Stringer and Dr. Hopkins were appointed a 
committee of three to consult with the rector, the Rev. Dr. Brown, in 
regard to a suitable place for holding the church services. It was 
decided to ask the congregation to continue paying their pew rents as 
usual while the church was being rebuilt. 

Mr. Walker stated that the Rev. John Huske would probably be 
willing and able to accept the invitation of the vestry to take charge 
of St. Paul's from June ist to September i, 1888, after the departure 
of Dr. Brown to his new parish in New York City. 



1 68 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Letters were then read from the Rev. Dr. Lobdell, offering the use 
of Trinity Church, frona Wm. Thurstone, warden, offering St. John's, 
and from the Rev. Dr. Hitchcock, placing Ascension Church at the use 
of St. Paul's. Judge George A. Lewis, on behalf of the trustees of the 
First Presbyterian Church, generously offered the use of that edifice. 
Letters of condolence and sympathy were received from ministers 
and people of all denominations, showing how much affection was felt 
by the people for the " mother church " of the city. 

Dr. Brown also stated that the Rev. Dr. Israel Aaron, Rabbi of the 
Temple Beth Zion, had called upon him, and most kindly and cordially 
offered the Temple for the free use of St. Paul's congregation, on 
Sundays, until the church should be rebuilt. 

In the correspondence between the authorities of the Temple and 
St. Paul's Vestry, the secretary of the Board of Trustees of the 
Temple writes : "In answer to that part of your communication with 
reference to remuneration, this Board has resolved that in the spirit in 
which the use of our Temple has been offered to your congregation it 
would be impossible for us to accept compensation under any consid- 
eration." 

The generous offer of the Rev. Rabbi and the Trustees of the 
Temple was accepted by St. Paul's committee as follows : 

^ ^ . "May 21, 1888. 

Rev. Dr. Israel Aaron. 

" Rev'd and Dear Sir, — The communication of Secretary Rosenau of the Board of 
Trustees of Temple Beth Zion, dated 17th inst., tendering the free use of your 
Temple for four months to the congregation of St. Paul's came duly to hand, and at 
an informal meeting of the vestry of the church and Rev. Dr. Brown, your very gen- 
erous and noble offer was accepted in the spirit in which it was made and with our 
most sincere and heartfelt thanks. The chairman of our committee. Dr. Davidson, 
being seriously ill, the writer and the other member of said committee, Dr. Hopkins, 
would be pleased to meet you and Mr. Keiser, at your residence, this Monday evening 
at half-past eight, or to-morrow evening at that hour. Kindly advise as to which even- 
ing will be most agreeable to you. 

" Yours very sincerely, 

"(Signed.) GEORGE A. STRINGER." 



-r ^ 



o 

7^ 






S P 






H 
W 




History of St. Paul's Church. 169 

The services, beginning on the Sunday after the fire, were accord- 
ingly held, until the completion of the new church, in the Temple Beth 
Zion* on Niagara Street, between Pearl and Franklin streets, where 
the new Masonic Temple now stands, the Rev. John Huske being the 
minister-in-charge after the departure of Dr; Brown for New York. 

At the first service in the Temple, May 1 3, 1 888, the Sunday following 
the fire, being the First Sunday after the Ascension, most of the parish- 
ioners were present, feeling their common calamity. The singular coin- 
cidence of the words in the regular Gospel for the day — " They shall 
put you out of the synagogues" — was noticed and commented on by 
all, with a feeling of thankfulness that the days when those words were 
literally true had passed away forever, and in their place had come 
a period in which disparity of religious views did not interfere with 
brotherly sympathy and help in time of trouble. This was especially 
referred to by the Rev. Dr. Brown, in his sermon. 

A special meeting of the vestry was held on Friday evening. May 25, 
1888, to take action relative to the death of Dr. Augustus R. Davidson. 

During the fire. Dr. Davidson had been foremost in directing the 
work of removing the few memorials and other articles which it was 
possible to save from the flames. Overexertion and exposure to wet 
and cold at this time brought on the attack of pneumonia which caused 
his untimely and deeply-mourned death. 

The following preamble and resolution were presented, and, on 
motion, unanimously adopted : 

" Whereas, Almighty God in His inscrutable Providence has taken from our 
midst our beloved friend and associate, Augustus R. Davidson, M. D. ; 

"Resolved, That while we submit in faith and hope to the will of our Heavenly 
Father in taking to the rest of Paradise our brother, we desire to place on record our 
appreciation of the noble nature of the deceased, who for the past eight years as a 
vestryman of this parish, and for many years a communicant of St. Paul's, and also 
for a long period an active and efficient member of the Council of St. Paul's Guild, and 
recently a sustaining power in St. Andrew's Mission, always performed with unswerv- 
ing devotion the duty of the hour. He was a most affectionate husband and father, a 

* See letter of the late Hon. Lewis F. Allen, page 366. 



I/O History of St. Paul's Church. 

tender and sympathetic physician, a loyal and a steadfast friend. ' Spirit nobler, 
gentler, braver, never shall behold the light.' With this expression of our love for him 
and our sense of loss in his death, we extend to his bereaved family, to the parish 
which he adorned, and to the community in which he held an honored place, this assur- 
ance of personal grief and heartfelt sympathy." .... 

Augustus Reginald Davidson, M. D., was born in Canada in 1845 ; 
his father was a clergyman of the Church of England. He came to 
Buffalo about the year 1870, and became proprietor of the former 
" Peabody Drug Store," on the corner of Main and Chippewa streets. 
In 1878, having graduated from the Medical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Buffalo, he began the practice of medicine, and made a 
specialty of chemistry, in which he was very proficient. He was, at 
the time of his death, one of the professors in the Medical Depart- 
ment of the Niagara University. Dr. Davidson was a member of the 
vestry of St. Paul's from the year 1876 until his death, May 25, 1888. 

On Sunday morning, May 27, 1888, the Rev. Dr. Brown preached 
his farewell sermon as rector of St. Paul's, at the Temple Beth Zion. 
His text was from II. Cor., xiii., 14 : " The grace of the Lord Jesus 
Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Ghost, 
be with you all. Amen." His parting words at the close of his ser- 
mon were marked with deep feeling, as he recalled the years during 
which he and his people had worked so happily together, and he 
assured them that wherever he might be his love and affection would 
ever be with them. 

October 2, 1888, at a meeting of the vestry, it was decided to obtain 
subscriptions for restoring the church edifice according to the plans of 
Robert W. Gibson of New York City, the architect of All Saints' 
Cathedral at Albany. 

Mr. Gibson came from Albany, and, after consulting with the 
committee, some changes were made in the plans, the proposed Church 
Street porch and the vestry-room being (at first) omitted. The plans. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 171 

with these changes, were again submitted to the builders, and the con- 
tracts were finally let at the following figures : 

Charles Berrick, mason work, ... . $19,741.00 

Wm. D Collingwood, cut stone, . . . . 26,969 00 

Jacob Reimann, carpenter work, . . . 28,492.00 

Kellogg, iron work, . ... . . . . . . 403.00 

Making a total of .... $75,605.00 

This does not include plastering, or the woodwork of the pews or 
of the chancel. Mr. Walker stated that $40,000 would be needed over 
and above the insurance to rebuild the church. Mr. Barnard said that 
if $50,000 could be raised it would be possible to carry out the original 
plans of the architect without omission or changes. 

On motion, it was decided to send out a circular, signed by the 
vestry, to the congregation, explaining all that had been done so far 
towards rebuilding, and calling for subscriptions, which was accord- 
ingly done. 

October 23, 1888, the finance committee reported to the vestry the 
several amounts received from insurance on the church property, 
amounting in all to $60,445. The insurance companies paid at differ- 
ent dates from May 19th to September 6, 1888. 

It was decided to add the building of the new vestry-room to the 
contract. On November 8, 1888, the building cortimittee decided to 
add the Church Street porch also. 



1889. 

February 10, 1889, a special meeting of the vestry was called to 
take action on the death of the senior warden, Charles W. Evans, 
which took place on February 8th. 



172 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Mr. Walker opened the meeting with a few appropriate remarks, 
and presented the following minute, which was then adopted : 

" The vestry of St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, desire to place on record their deep 
sense of the loss sustained by the vestry and by the church in the death of Charles W. 
Evans, who for many years has been the efficient and devoted senior warden of the 
parish. 

" True and loyal as Mr. Evans was in all the relations of life, he was pre-eminently 
so in relation to St. Paul's Church. Formerly the faithful clerk of the vestry, also the 
treasurer of the parish, afterwards a member of the vestry, and for nearly twenty-five 
years the senior warden, he discharged the duties of all these positions with rare fidelity. 
He was one of the most valued friends of the late Dr. Shelton, who knew him well, 
and had for him the highest regard. 

"His knowledge of the parish was unequaled, and by his efforts its records have 
been most carefully arranged and preserved. His benefactions to the church were 
constant and very liberal. 

" He was a wise counselor, and the parish and vestry will sadly miss and deeply 
mourn the departure of their associate and friend." 

Charles Worthington Evans, son of William and Margaret (Ran- 
dall) Evans, was born in the City of Baltimore, Maryland, March 13, 
181 2. His family and immediate connections were members of the 
Society of Friends, and he attended their meetings, but never formally 
joined them. As a young man, in Baltimore, he was in the Firemen's 
Insurance Company and the Merchants' Bank of Baltimore, and June 
28, 183s, he removed to Buffalo, where his father's family had been 
living since 1832, and soon after joined St. Paul's parish. 

During the fifty-three years of his business life in Buffalo, he was 
established on the Evans Ship Canal, which was constructed in 1833 by 
his father, William Evans, through part of outer lot No. 3 deeded by 
the Holland Land Company to Benjamin EUicott, brother of Joseph 
EUicott, who laid out Buffalo in 1804. On the death of Benjamin EUi- 
cott this property was set off to his sister, Letitia EUicott Evans, the 
mother of William Evans, and grandmother of Charles W. Evans. 
Mr. Evans was the oldest surviving elevator owner in the city, having 
operated the Evans elevator for more than forty-one years. He was 
also one of the oldest members of St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, having 



History of St. Paul's Church. 173 

been connected with the parish for more than forty-three years. He 
was associated with George C. Webster, DeWitt C. Weed and William 
• H. Walker in what was known for several years, from 1847, as the 
" Junior Vestry," and these four young men made the first concerted 
movement towards the building of the new church. 

Mr. Evans had been honored by his fellow parishioners with all the 
offices in the parish, and was one of the wardens for the twenty- five 
years preceding his death. He was clerk of the vestry from 1848 until 
April, 1854, when he was also appointed treasurer of the parish, 
and in May, 1854, he was also elected vestryman, which three 
offices he held until 1858. He was one of the vestry from 
i860 to 1862 ; he was junior warden from April, 1863, until 
1870, when he was elected senior warden, continuing in this office 
until his death in 1889. 

He was probably more familiar with all matters relating to the 
parish than any other person ; he was also a warm personal friend of 
the late Rev. Dr. Shelton, who made him, in connection with Mr. 
William H. Walker, one of the executors of his estate. During his 
long life Mr. Evans had entrusted to him for settlement many large 
estates, and he was continually being placed in positions of trust and 
responsibility. In 1857 he married Miss Mary Peacock of Mayville, 
Chautauqua County, daughter of John and Mercy M. Peacock, and 
niece of Judge William Peacock, in whose house at Mayville she had 
always lived as a daughter, her mother having died while she was still 
a very young child. 

Mr. Evans was a studious man, and all his life a lover of good 
books and of literary work. He wrote the " History of the Fox, Elli- 
cott, and Evans Families," published in 1882, and had for many years 
been collecting materials for and writing the " History of St. Paul's 
Church," which he left in manuscript, and which forms the first part of 
this volume, as mentioned in the Preface. Outside of his family, one 
of his chiefest objects of interest and affection was St. Paul's Church, 
with which he had been identified for so many years, and in which 



174 History of St. Paul's Church. 

he was almost always present at divine service on Sundays, sitting 
in the same pew which he had occupied from the time the church was 
built until it was destroyed by fire in 1888. He did not live to see the 
restoration of the present church edifice completed, his death occur- 
ring February 8, 1889. He was survived by his wife and two daugh- 
ters, Mrs. G. Hunter Bartlett and Miss Virginia Evans, now Mrs. 
Walter Devereux. 

The property of the First Presbyterian Church, opposite St. Paul's, 
was sold April 18, 1889, to the Erie County Savings Bank, the total 
cost to the bank being $188,500. The new " First Church " was built 
on The Circle. The old edifice was demolished, and the imposing new 
building of the bank which was erected on its site was completed in 

1893- 

This piece of land was " Lot 43," which had been deeded to the 
trustees of the First Presbyterian Society of the Town of Buffalo, by 
the Holland Land Company, December 12, 1820, and upon which, 
in 1823, the society built a small, frame lecture-room, which gave 
place to the brick "First Church," dedicated March 28, 1827. (Page 

3°-) 

In 1818, Joseph Ellicott, agent of the Holland Land Company, had 
informed the Rev. Mr. Clark, rector of St. Paul's, that the vestry 
might have their choice of lots 43 or 42 (the opposite lot across Church 
Street) on condition that they build their church on the lot chosen. 
The vestry promptly accepted this offer, and selected Lot 42. (See 
facsimile of Mr. Ellicott's letter of May 20, 1819, opposite page 14.) 
The corner stone of the original St. Paul's was laid June 24, 1819. 
The formal deed of Lot 42 from the Holland Land Company was 
given on June 14, 1820. (Pages 14, 19.) St. Paul's was consecrated 
February 25, 1821. (Page 20.) 

Ever since these early times, this part of Main Street has borne 
the popular designation of "The Churches." In 1897 it was officially 
renamed Shelton Square by the city authorities, in honor of Dr. Shel- 



History of St. Paul's Church. 175 

ton, a new street or square having been formed as described on 
page 219. (See illustrations opposite pages 16, 38, 46, 152, 254, 440.) 

At the annual election, Easter Monday, April 22, 1889, the follow- 
ing wardens and vestrymen were chosen : 

William H. Walker and A. Porter Thompson, wardens ; John Pease, 
James R. Smith, Henry R. Hopkins, George Alfred Stringer, Robert 
P. Wilson, Albert J. Barnard, James Sweeney, and Edmund Hayes, 
vestrymen. 

At a meeting of the vestry held May 9, 1889, G. Hunter Bartlett was 
re-elected clerk of the vestry, and James W. Sanford was re-elected 
treasurer of the parish. 

At the same meeting an explanation was ordered entered in the 
minutes in regard to the sum of $150 appearing in the Treasurer's 
Report as paid to the treasurer of Temple Beth Zion for rent. The 
authorities of the Temple Beth Zion gave the use of the Temple to 
St. Paul's free of all charges whatever, refusing compensation even for 
heating and lights. The building was sold to the Masonic bodies of 
the city, February i, 1889, and the $150 mentioned in the report was 
paid for the use of the Temple after February ist, and went into the 
Masonic treasury. 

On motion, it was resolved : " That the clerk of the vestry be directed 
to transmit to the Reverend Rabbi and to the trustees of the Temple 
Beth Zion the grateful thanks of the rector, wardens and vestry of St. 
Paul's Church for the hospitality extended to the congregation of St. 
Paul's during so many months. It is difficult for the vestry to ade- 
quately express their thanks for the bestowal of a hospitality so gen- 
erous and open-handed, which refused all compensation even for 
heating and lights, and hard to state in words their full appreciation of 
the spirit in which it was given." 

The finance committee reported that the sums subscribed and 
pledged by the members of the congregation for the rebuilding of the 
church amounted to more than $60,000. 



176 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



Subscription, IRebuil&ing St. iPaul's Cburcb, 1888. 



FROM THE ORIGINAL LIST. 



E. L. Stevenson, 
Wm. H. Walker, 
James M. Smith, 
Charles W. Evans, 
Mary Evans, 
A. P. Thompson, | 

Matilda C. Thompson, C 
S. Douglas Cornell, . 
James R. Smith, . 
Edmund Hayes, 
Geo. Alfred Stringer, 
H. R. Hopltins, . . 
Matthew D. Mann, . 
E. H. Hutchinson, . 
A. J. Barnard, i 
Clara S. Barnard, j 
Jane W. Grosvenor, 
Abby W. Grosvenor, 
Lucretia S. Grosvenor, 
William H. Glenny, i 
Jane G. Glenny, j 

James Sweeney, 
Robert P. Wilson, i 
Margaret L. Wilson, f 
Agnes L. Warren, . 
Laetitia P. Viele, 
Sarah E. Bryant, . . 
Geo. S. Field, 
Margaret C. Field, 
Elizabeth A. McKee, 
Edith K. Walker, . 
Susan E. Kimberly, 
Charlotte Kimberly, 



\- 



5,000.00 
5,000.00 


Mrs. Louisa M. Weed, 
Hobart Weed, 


• 


. $1,000.00 


J, 000. 00 


Geo. N. Burwell, . 




. 1,000.00 




Geraldine H. R. Richmond 


,' 


2,500.00 


John R. H. Richmond 








Lillian R. Richmond, 




• 1,000.00 


2,500.00 


Gerald H. Richmond, 






2,500.00 


Edward S. Richmond, 






2,000.00 


A. Cleveland Coxe, . 




500.00 


2,000.00 


Mary H. Lee, 




500.00 


1,000.00 


Agnes Squier, 




500.00 


1,000.00 


Ella F. Cook, . . . 




200.00 


1,000.00 


Jane G. Dann, . . 


, 


500.00 


1,000.00 


R. E, McWiUiams, 






1,000.00 


Mary R. McWiUiams, 
Charles G. Curtiss, . 


500.00 
500.00 




Lucy H. Weed, 
George T. Weed, 






1,500.00 




500.00 




Edward L. Kimberly, 




500. 00 


1,000.00 


T. W. Cushing, . 
Howard H. Baker, . 




250,00 
300.00 


1,000.00 


W. A. Joyce, . . . 




200.00 


1,000.00 


E. C. Walker, . . 
0. H. P. Champlin, 




200.00 
200 00 


1,000.00 


S. D. Caldwell, . . 




200.00 


1,000.00 


Edward Bennett, . . 




200.00 


1,000.00 


Lester Wheeler, . 




100.00 


1,000.00 


Bernard Bartow, . . 
P. P. Burtis, . . . 




50.00 

200.00 


1,000.00 


John L. Kimberly, Jr 


, 


200.00 


1,000.00 


J. Tillinghast, . . 




200.00 


1,000.00 


M. Powers Fillmore, 
John Huske, . . . 




500.00 
. . 100.00 



Mrs. J. C. Devereux, . 


. . $50.00 


Miss Catherine McVicker, 


100.00 


Dr. and Mrs. Frank W. Ab 


bott, 100 00 


Elizabeth A. Longnecker, 


. . 100.00 


Josephine Looney, . . 


. . 50.00 


Frances C. Dougherty, . 


. . 25.00 


C. A. Dougherty, . . 


. . 25.00 


Samuel G. Walker, . . 


. . 50.00 


Caroline E. Scroggs, 


200.00 


J. A. Lepper, . . . 


15-00 


Anna Hoxsie Cook, . . 


. . 200.00 


Chas. E. Williams, . . 


50.00 


Thomas G. Perkins, 


100.00 


Geo. M. Ogilvie, . . 


100.00 


John M. Ogilvie, . . 


. . 20.00 


J. H. Marling, 


. . 25.00 


Helen L. Spencer, i 
Harriet M. Spencer, | ' 




. . 25.00 


Philip S. Smith, . 


50.00 


John G. Luber, 


. . 50.00 


Henry Bristol, . . . 


200.00 


M. Caroline Persch, . . 


. . 100.00 


Edward L. Brady, . . 


50.00 


Mrs. Edward L. Brady, 


. . 50.00 


Thomas Lothrop, 


. . 50.00 


E. F. Meister, . . 


25.00 


Jessie A. McKenna, 


25.00 


Mary E. Walker, . . 


25.00 


T. H. Mendsen, . . . 


. . 100.00 


S. L. Porter, . . 


20.00 


S. E. Laird, . . . 


25.00 


J. C. Nagel, . . 


. . 200.00 


Lee H. Smith, i 
Corrie L. Smith, \ 




50.00 


Wm. B. Gallagher, . 


50.00 


Mary L. Gallagher, . . 


50.00 


Henry English, . . . 


100.00 


Fred T. Johnson, 


25.00 


Mrs. Chas. Mary, 


25.00 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



Mrs. Geo. E. Hayes 
Jas. R. Silliman, 
Urania Silliman, 
Thos. F. Lewis, . . 
W. B. Moore, . . 
Sanford C. McKnight, 
Susan Sanford, 
J. W. Sanford, 
Geo. F. McKnight, j 

Carrie G McKnight, J 
R. Ferguson, . . . 
Wm. Y. Warren, . . 
Clara B. Warren, . . 
Janet W. Rodney, 
E. S. Warren, . . 
Laetitia V. W. Hasbrouck, 
S. T. Smith, . . 
Sheldon T. Viele, 1 
Anna D. Viele, ) 
Sheldon Thompson, 
Fannie M. Thompson 
W. T. Miller, ) 

Catharine T. Miller, S 
Alice J. Thompson, 
Agnes W. Thompson, . 
AjUgustus A. Thompson 
Marian A. Thompson, 
Laetitia V. Thompson, 
E. W. Thompson, 
Clara B. Thompson, 
Albert S. Thompson, 
Matilda J. Thompson, 
Nath. J. Hall, . 
Charlotte T. Wright, 
Eliza Gorman, . . 
Mary Gorman, . . 
Matthew O'Neill, 
Mrs. Edwin Hurlbert, 
Maria L. Callender, . 



177 

f 2, 000. 00 
50.00 

25.00 
25.00 

400.00 



50 


00 


100. 00 


100.00 


50 


00 


100.00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


100.00 


50 


CO 


50 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 



25.00 



25.00 



25.00 
100.00 
25.00 
25.00 
500.00 
500.00 
150.00 



178 



History of St. Pauls Church. 



Matilda Hill, . . . 

Mrs. Streater and family, 
Spencer Clinton, . 
Charles R. Wilson, . . 
Mrs. Thomas Rose, 
T. W. McKnight, . . 



% 1500 
25.00 
100.00 
25.00 
50.00 
25.00 



H. R. Howland, . 
B. Rumsey, . . 
Elisha T. Smith, . , 
Julia W. Smith, . . 
Wm. Warren Smith, 
Daniel O'Day, 



$ 25.00 
25.00 
50.00 
30.00 
20.00 
100.00 



The pews in the former church edifice were mostly held in fee by 
individual owners, who also paid a yearly rental, as fixed by the vestry. 
(See reproduction of old pew deeds opposite pages 22, 54.) As the 
destruction of the church by fire in 1888 annulled this ownership, it was 
decided that henceforth no pews should be sold to individuals, but that 
they should be owned by the churcl^, and rented from year to year. 
The former individual ownership dated from 1820, when the first 
sale of pews in the original frame church was held. This individual 
ownership led to some curious complications, the Bank of England at 
one time obtaining title to one of the pews. (See page 385.) 

The same system was continued in the new stone church, which 
was first occupied in 185 1. The subscriptions to the building 
fund were made in the form of purchases of stock, the pews being 
deeded by the church to the various subscribers in proportion to the 
amounts of their several subscriptions. Persons who had owned pews 
in the old frame church were also given pews of a proportionate value 
in the new church. In after years this ownership of the pews by indi- 
viduals caused, as before stated, many complications, and it was found 
desirable to do away with it, but the legal difficulties in the way could 
not be overcome without undue trouble and cost. The fire, however, 
cancelled these obligations, and all of the pews in the restored St. Paul's 
are now held in fee by the church corporation, and rented from year 
to year by the vestry. The subscriptions to the fund after the fire of 
1888 were made with no reference to an equivalent ownership of stock 
or pews in the restored edifice, but simply as gifts for rebuilding the 
church. 

A communication from the finance committee to the congregation. 



History of St. Paul's CInirch. 179 

dated April 10, 1889, reports that "during the past eventful year the 
pew rentals have — as a general rule — been promptly paid. . . . The 
church is now approaching completion, and for the ensuing year we 
shall at first hold our services in the Sunday School room." . 
The Easter services, April 21, 1889, were held in the basement Sunday- 
school room, or "Crypt Chapel." 

At the vestry meeting of May 9, 1889, a letter from the Rev. John 
Huske, the minister-in-charge, dated May 7, 1889, was read, in which 
he placed in the hands of the vestry his resignation of the position of 
minister-in-charge of St. Paul's, the resignation to go into effect on 
Saturday, the nth inst. Mr. Huske had been called to the rectorship 
of St. Paul's Church in Erie, Pa., of which parish he took charge in 
the autumn of 1889, on his return from a European trip. 

In the minutes of the vestry on the resignation of Mr. Huske, it 
was stated : 

" The wardens and vestry of St. Paul's Church accept the resignation of the Rev. 
John Huske as minister-in-charge of the parish, with sincere regret, and will always 
retain a grateful memory of his ministrations among us. The circumstances under 
which Mr. Huske took up the work in St. Paul's were peculiarly sad. The church had 
been partially destroyed by fire, and this was followed by the departure of the rector, 
the Rev. John W. Brown, D. D., who had, previous to that calamity, accepted the 
call to St. Thomas's Church, New York. In the face of these and many other serious 
difficulties, Mr. Huske has performed most excellent work. By his courage and 
efforts he has succeeded to an unusual degree in holding the congregation together, 
and his labors, especially among the sick and afflicted, have been constant and faithful. 
In all respects he has done his duty nobly and well. 

" The vestry unite with the congregation in wishing the Rev. Mr. Huske a pros- 
perous voyage to Europe and a safe return, and also tender to him their warmest 
wishes for his welfare and happiness in the important parish to which he has been 
called." . . . 

At the same meeting Mr. Walker stated that the Rev. G. Mott Wil- 
liams had been temporarily engaged as minister-in-charge of the parish. 

(In 1895, the Rev. Mr. Williams was made bishop of the diocese of 
Marquette, Michigan.) 



i8o History of St. Paul's Church. 

A committee of five, consisting of A. P. Thompson, chairman, W. 
H. Wallcer, Col. Barnard, Edmund Hayes and Dr. Hopkins, was ap- 
pointed to receive applications for memorial windows, and to pass 
upon the artistic merit and appropriateness of the designs selected. 

At a special meeting of the vestry, September 12, 1889, Mr. Walker 
introduced the subject of obtaining a rector for St. Paul's Church, and 
spoke at some length concerning the Rev. Henry A. Adams, first 
assistant of Trinity Church, New York City. The following motion 
was then offered and unanimously adopted : 

" Resolved, That the committee charged with the duty of securing a rector for the 
parish be and are hereby authorized — if acting unanimously — to call the Rev. 
Henry A. Adams of New York to that position." 

The Hon. James M. Smith, George Alfred Stringer and O. H. P. 
Champlin were elected delegates to the fifty-second annual Council of 
the Diocese, at the same meeting. 

October 16, 1889, the chairman reported for the committee on finding 
a rector, the call and acceptance of the Rev. Henry A. Adams ; that 
the rectorate was to date from October 15, 1889, and that the rector's 
salary was to be $6,000 per annum. 

Robert Wilkinson gave up his position as sexton, and afterwards 
became janitor of the new Fii;st Presbyterian Church on The Circle. 
He had been at St. Paul's for ten years, and was succeeded in Novem- 
ber, 1889, by William Graveson. 

At a meeting of the vestry, November 29, 1889, at the house of the 
rector, the Rev. Henry A. Adams, it was moved and carried that the 
dedication of the church be held upon January 2d or 3d, 1890, and that 
the rector and wardens be a committee to make the necessary arrange- 
ments for that occasion. It was also moved and carried that this 
committee wait upon the bishop and invite him to hold the services of 
his twenty-fifth anniversary in St. Paul's, and also inform him that it 
is the desire of the vestry that the dedication of the church shall be 
held in connection with his anniversary services. 

On motion, the clerk was directed to express the thanks of the 



History of St. Paul's Church. i8i 

vestry to William D. Collingwood for his generous gift of the stone 
font to the church. (See pages 274, 394.) 

December 21, 1889, at a meeting of the vestry, a letter was read 
from Mrs. Charles W. Evans and her daughters, Mrs. Alice Evans 
Bartlett and Miss Virginia Evans, formally presenting the brass memo- 
rial lectern to the church, upon which the following was offered : 

" Whereas, A communication has been received by the vestry from Mrs. Charles 
W. Evans and her daughters stating that they have placed a brass lectern in St. 
Paul's Church as a memorial to the late senior warden, Charles Worthington Evans ; 
therefore, 

"Resolved, That this vestry gladly accepts this costly and beautiful memorial, and 
wishes to offer to Mrs. Evans and her daughters its grateful acknowledgment of this 
most acceptable gift." .... (See page 287.) 

At a meeting of the building committee, December 12, 1889, it was 
resolved that the designs " for the oak litany desk to be presented by 
Charles A. Gould be adopted, with the thanks of the committee to the 
donor." (See page 288.) 

Saturday, December 28, 1889, there was a second fire in St. Paul's 
Church, which was, however, overcome with slight damage to the build- 
ing or contents. It was caused by an overheated smoke pipe in the 
Erie Street porch. One of the local papers, commenting on this fire, 
said : " Fifty dollars will probably cover the loss, which is a low 
price to pay for discovering a dangerous fire-trap." Another paper 
said : " Few events within the limits of ordinary happenings in the 
city could cause so intense and widespread excitement as the report 

that St. Paul's Church was on fire If the City Hall had been 

on fire, the excitement about town would not have been so great." 



1890. 

For detailed description of the church as rebuilt, see special chap- 
ter, " The Restored St. Paul's," page 265. 



1 82 History of St. Paul's Church. 

January 2, 1890, at a meeting of the vestry, the rector stated that 
the entire church edifice was not to be consecrated by the bishop, but 
only the new extension to the church, the old walls being still standing. 
The service, as stated by the bishop, would be one of " Hallowing and 
Reconciling" after the restoration of the church edifice. 

The Instrument of Donation was then read, and on motion of Mr. 
Walker, all the members of the vestry then present signed the Instru- 
ment and the clerk affixed the seal : 

IFnstrument. 

"Reverend Father in God; 

"We, the Rector, Church Wardens and Vestrymen of St. Paul's Church in the 
City of Buffalo, having by the blessing of God rebuilt and restored our parish church, 
known also as St. Paul's Cathedral, after its pa' tial destruction by fire, do hereby offer 
it to receive at your hands, by a public solemnity, such renewal of its sacred character 
as in your judgment is requisite. And forasmuch as by an Instrument of Donation, 
dated October 4th, A. D. 185 1, the former house was placed under the jurisdiction of 
the Right Reverend William Heathcote De Lancey, then Bishop of Western New 
York, for himself and for his successors in office ; and forasmuch as thereupon the 
said Bishop did receive the same, and by solemn rites did consecrate and make it a 
Church on the 22d day of October, A. D. 1851. 

" Now, therefore, we, the corporation aforesaid, do hereby renew and freshly assume 
all the obligations then by this corporation acknowledged and professed. And we do 
solemnly ratify the said Instrument, and hold it to be binding upon us and our suc- 
cessors according to its original intent, with respect of this church as restored, im- 
proved and enlarged. And we do hereby pray you so to set it apart, and to restore it 
after desecration (to which it has been more or less exposed in the process of rebuild- 
ing), so that it may be no further secularized or profaned, but may be continually hal- 
lowed by all men as a House of Prayer, and used exclusively for the Worship and 
Glory of Almighty God. according to the Doctrines, Liturgy, Rites and Usages of the 
Church known as the ' Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America.' 
And further, as the chancel of this church hath been much enlarged, and is rebuilt 
partly upon new and unconsecrated ground, we therefore do, by these presents, as 
respects the said enlargement, assume all the obligations of the Instrument aforesaid, 
as if the new chancel or choir had been part and parcel of the original fabric at the 
date of its consecration. And we do hereby move you, Reverend Father, to take the 




KKSTORRD ST. 1>AI'I,'S. 
Krum Main Street. 



a|.li b\ A. W Simon, l8i« 



History of St. Paul's Church. 183 

same into your jurisdiction and to consecrate and set it apart for sacred uses exclu- 
sively. The same is designed to be a Memorial of the life and ministry of the Rev- 
erend William Shelton, D. D., for more than half a century Rector of this church ; and 
we ask you to recognize it as such in your Apostolic Sentence, making it a Holy Place 
for the due celebration of the Blessed Sacrament of the Body and Blood of Christ, and 
for all other rites and usages which by the Canons and Rubrics of the Church are 
appointed for such Holy Place in the House of God. 

In Witness Whereof we have hereunto set our hands and the seal of this Cor- 
poration, in the City of Buffalo, on this 2d day of January, in the Year of Our Lord 
One Thousand, Eight Hundred and Ninety." 

On Friday morning, at eleven o'clocl?, January 3, 1890, the service 
of Reconciling and Hallowing was held by Bishop Coxe in St. Paul's, 
and the restored church was formally reopened and dedicated to the 
Worship of Almighty God in the presence of a large congregation. 
The bishop, preceded by a long line of choristers and clergy, entered 
the church. The procession passed through the north aisle and up 
the center aisle to the chancel, the 68th Psalm being repeated mean- 
while by the bishop and the clergy and congregation responsively. 
After reaching the chancel, the Instrument of Donation was read by 
the rector, the Rev. Mr. Adams, and the bishop proceeded in the 
office, arranged by him for this occasion, in a form slightly differing 
from that for the consecration of a church. The Sentence of Conse- 
cration was then read, and was placed by the bishop upon the Holy 
Table. The Benediction and Invocation followed, after which Morn- 
ing Prayer was said. The sermon was by Bishop Coxe, the text being 
from Nehemiah xiii., 14 : "Remember me, O my God, concerning this, 
and wipe not out my good deeds that I have done for the house of my 
God, and for the offices thereof." In the course of his sermon, the 
Bishop quoted the words of Dr. Shelton on the occasion of the former 
consecration : " If the spirits are mercifully allowed to revisit the 
scenes of earth, we may be assured they will look down upon us to-day, 
and sing Hosannahs, with us, in the Highest." The bishop also 
referred to the work so successfully carried out by the congregation, 
and said : " Out of the ashes of humiliation, the church has sprung 



184 History of St. Paul's Church. 

up greater and more beautiful than ever." The offering was for St. 
Philip's Church, and the services closed with the Celebration of the 
Holy Communion. 

In the evening of the same day, January 3, 1890, the commemora- 
tive services were held in St. Paul's for the completion of the twenty- 
fifth year of Bishop Coxe's Episcopate, as the second Bishop of West- 
ern New York. " St. Paul's never before looked so resplendent. Since 
the disastrous fire of eighteen months ago, its interior had been entirely 
renovated and greatly beautified, and on the morning of this day it 
had been hallowed with a special service by the Bishop of the Dio- 
cese The vested choirs of St. Paul's, Trinity, Ascension, St. 

Luke's, St. Mary's, St. Andrew's, All-Saints, and the Good Shepherd, 
all of Buffalo, and consisting of some 250 voices, each choir led by a 
crucifer, passed from the crypt to the west door of the church, singing 
'The Son of God goes forth to war.' .... The clergy, vested in 
cassock, surplice, and white stoles, and many, by request of the bishop, 
wearing the colored hoods indicative of their academic degrees, fol- 
lowed, and opening ranks upon reaching the choir, the bishops and 
elder clergy passed into the Sanctuary. Evensong was then impres- 
sively rendered, and the special prayers, set forth by the Bishop of the 

Diocese, were said At the close of Evening Prayer, the Rev. 

Dr. Rankine, Rector of DeLancey Divinity School, and of St. Peter's 
Church, Geneva, being one of the oldest priests in the Diocese, and 
one of the attending priests at Bishop Coxe's consecration, was dele- 
gated by the committee to deliver a congratulatory address to the 
bishop." .... During his address. Dr. Rankine stated that the 
clergy of the Diocese desired to present to the bishop a Pastoral Staff, 
for the Diocese of Western New York, to be delivered on the near- 
approaching twenty-fifth anniversary, April 5, 1890, of his ceasing to 
be Coadjutor by the death of Bishop DeLancey, and of his entering 
upon the full responsibility of Episcopal jurisdiction. The staff to 
remain in the Diocese as a memento of its marked progress under 
Bishop Coxe's supervision, and a transmitted bond in its future history. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 185 

At the close of the address, Dr. Rankine presented to the Bishop, on 
behalf of Hobart College and the DeLancey Divinity School, a rare 
book — a Book of Common Prayer in many languages. 

After Bishop Coxe's response, he was addressed by the Hon. James 
M. Smith, LL. D., Chancellor of the Diocese, who, on behalf of the 
laymen of the Diocese, presented the Bishop with a purse of twenty- 
five hundred dollars. 

The sermon was delivered by the Rt. Rev. Henry C. Potter, D. D., 
LL. D., Bishop of New York, and was an eloquent characterization of 
what constitutes an ideal Bishop, which, without being direct praise, 
touched delicately on many points of Bishop Coxe's own character. 

The Recessional Hymn was, " I love Thy Kingdom, Lord." After 
the clergy and choirs had passed into the crypt, the Bishop spoke 
touchingly to the singers, thanking them for their part in the services 
of the evening. The choirs of the different churches were accompa- 
nied by their respective choir-masters, and the music was under the 
general direction of Samuel J. Gilbert, organist and choir-master of 
St. Paul's. The anthems and hymns were all familiar ones, and the 
musical portion of the service was most inspiring. 

At ten o'clock on Saturday morning, January 4th, at St. Paul's, 
there was a solemn celebration of the Holy Eucharist, attended by 
many of the clergy and laity, gathered from all parts of the Diocese. 
Bishop Coxe was the celebrant, and was assisted by Bishop Potter, the 
Rev. William A. Hitchcock, D. D., of Ascension Church, and the Rev. 
Francis Lobdell, D. D., of Trinity. The sermon was preached by 
Bishop Coxe, and was addressed personally and intimately to the 
clergy of the Diocese, as to the mutual relations of Bishop and Pres- 
byter. He recalled the early history of the Diocese, and referred to 
the pioneers of the Church in the then wilds. He said : " Western 
New York owes its existence as a planted Church, chiefly and first of 
all to the piety of a single Presbyter, Davenport Phelps" — and also 
of "his compeer, the revered Father Nash." Referring to his own 
consecration the Bishop said of the clergy who came about him at the 



1 86 History of St. Paul's Church. 

close, to press his hand : " When one came forward whom I had looked 
up to in my youth as one of the -most eloquent clergymen of the 
Church, when one so much my superior, with infinite humility came 
and took my hand, and looked into my face and called me his bishop, 
I remember what a lesson it was to me — to be humble indeed. I 
speak of the beloved IngersoU. When such a man as IngersoU saluted 
me, his younger brother, as his bishop, and wished me Godspeed out 
of a loving heart, the Lord knoweth I was humbled. I seem to see, 

even now, his beautiful expression, his tender and loving eyes 

I need not mention my venerated friend. Dr. Shelton, as one whom I 
loved. He at that time was not present. He had given me his prayers 
and blessing, and was then traveling in the Holy Land." .... 

After the service, the Rev. Dr. Van Dyke thanked the bishop, on 
behalf of the clergy of the diocese, for allowing them to demonstrate, 
in the way" that had been done, their appreciation of his many years 
of service among them. 

When a public commemoration had been at first proposed, the 
bishop had been much averse to it. 

The pastoral staff, of silver and ebony, of exquisite design and 
workmanship, was later received by the bishop, and at his death was 
transmitted to Bishop Walker as his successor in office, and is used as 
the pastoral staff of the diocese. It is said that the old wooden 
crozier, which Bishop Coxe used for many years, and of which he was 
especially fond, had been given to him by Dr. Shelton, and was made 
from wood from St. Paul's Church. This staff was buried with him. 

At a meeting of the vestry, held at the Parish House, formerly 
called the Guild House, March 26, 1890, it was moved and carried 
that the parish should have an assistant minister. At this meeting it 
was decided that the balance (about $2,400) of the $4,000 left to St. 
Paul's by the Rev. William Shelton, D. D., should be transferred tem- 
porarily to the building fund. Dr. Shelton left $2,000 to the parish, 
the interest to be used for chiming the bells. He also left $4,000 
unconditionally. A portion of this latter amount was used by the 



History of St. Paul's Church. 187 

vestry in 1886 for repointing the church edifice, repairing the stone 
crosses, etc. (See pages 149, 154, 155.) 

At the annual election of wardens and vestrymen, held on Easter 
Monday, April 7, 1890, the following persons were chosen : William 
H. Walker and A. Porter Thompson, wardens ; John Pease, James R. 
Smith, Henry R. Hopkins, George Alfred Stringer, Robert P. Wilson, 
Albert J. Barnard, James Sweeney and Edmund Hayes, vestrymen. 

At a meeting of the vestry held April 19, 1890, G. Hunter Bartlett 
was re-elected clerk of the vestry, and James W. Sanford was re-elected 
treasurer of the parish. 

May 13, 1890, at the Hygienic Institute, Geneva, N. Y., died Harriet 
M. Dayton, widely known throughout Western New York as " Sister 
Harriet." She was the daughter of the late Judge Nathan Dayton of 
Lockport, N. Y., and was born September 15, 1826, and went to Lock- 
port with her parents in 1832. She was a very faithful worker in the 
Church, and early gave her life up to charitable and religious work among 
sick, poor and afflicted humanity. She was the first ordained member 
of the Protestant Episcopal Order of Deaconesses, and came to Buffalo 
to labor under Bishop Coxe about 1880, later becoming a member of St. 
Paul's Church, where she worked under the direction of the Rev. Dr. 
Brown, as deaconess of the parish. Her work among the poor and sick 
was constant, and her quiet, gentle ways endeared her to all. Her funer- 
al was held in Grace Church, Lockport, and was very largely attended, 
not only by her old friends in Lockport but by many from Buffalo. 

September 11, 1890, at a meeting of the vestry, Mr. Walker spoke 
of the tablet which the vestry proposfed to place in the new Temple 
Beth Zion, on Delaware Avenue, as an acknowledgment of the cour- 
tesy and hospitality extended to St. Paul's by the Reverend Rabbi and 
the trustees of Temple Beth Zion after the burning of the church on May 
10, 1888. On motion, a committee was elected to procure such tablet. 
At this meeting, William H. Walker, Judge James M. Smith and 
O. H. P. Champlin were elected delegates to the Diocesan Convention 
to be held at Niagara Falls, September 16, 1890. 



1 88 History of St. Paul's Church. 

At the same meeting a letter from A. Porter Thompson to the 
rector, wardens, and vestrymen was read, in which he said : " In behalf 
of Agnes L. Warren, Laetitia P. Viele and myself, I hereby present to 
St. Paul's Church a bust in marble of the late Sheldon Thompson, our 
father, to replace the memorial bust heretofore in the church, and which 
was destroyed by the explosion in the church. Ascension Day, r888. 
The former bust was formally accepted by the vestry many years ago, and 
we now ask the acceptance of this memorial in place of the former one." 

The following preamble and resolution were thfen offered and 
unanimously adopted : 

' ' A commuaication having been read from Mr. A. Porter Thompson offering to 
St. Paul's Church, on behalf of himself and his sisters, Mrs. Warren and Mrs. Viele, 
a marble bust of their father, the late Sheldon Thompson, to replace the one formerly 
in the church. Therefore, 

' ' Resolved, That the vestry accepts with great pleasure this valuable memorial of 
one of the founders of this parish and gladly consents to its being placed in the 
church." (See pages 64, 292.) 



189I. 

At the annual election, Easter Monday, March 30, 1891, the follow- 
ing persons were elected as wardens and vestrymen : William H. 
Walker and A. Porter Thompson, wardens ; John Pease, Albert J. Bar- 
nard, George A. Stringer, James R. Smith, Robert P. Wilson, Edmund 
Hayes, James Sweeney and Sheldon T. Viele, vestrymen. 

April 14, 1 89 1, Edward L. Stevenson, one of Buffalo's oldest and 
most respected citizens, died. He had long been prominently identi- 
fied with St. Paul's Parish, was one of the vestry in i848-'49-'50-'5i, 
a member of the building committee for the new church edifice in 
1849, and always most liberal in his gifts to the church, especially for 
the rebuilding of the edifice after the disastrous fire of 1888. His 
name heads the subscription list of 1888 with the generous sum of $5,000. 



History of St. Pauls Church. 189 

Mr. Stevenson was over eighty-five years old at the time of his death, 
and had been identified with many of Buffalo's most important business 
enterprises. He was born in Auburn, Cayuga Co., March 31, 1806, to 
which place his parents had come from Massachusetts. Here he lived 
until 1823, when he came to Buffalo as manager of the famous stage 
route from Buffalo to Albany, which constituted in those days an enter- 
prise of very considerable magnitude. At one time four regular lines 
of coaches left Buffalo — the " Telegraph " line, which limited the num- 
ber of passengers to six, and in seasons of good roads made the distance 
to Albany in forty-eight hours, charging $15 fare ; the "Pilot" line, 
the " Diligence," and the regular mail and accommodation line. The 
three latter charged about $10 fare. Mr. Stevenson continued in the 
stage office until 1842, at which time the Buffalo & Attica Railroad 
was completed, forming the last link in the line from Buffalo to Albany, 
and practically ending the stage business over that route forever. 
During this period Mr. Stevenson made numerous investments in land ; 
these operations being carefully and judiciously conducted, yielded 
handsome profits and laid the foundation of his large fortune. For 
many years past Mr. Stevenson had devoted himself almost entirely to 
the care of his large real estate interests, and it was his pride to say 
that he had transacted business within a circle of too feet from his 
office on Main Street for a period of sixty years. 

Mr. Stevenson outlived his wife, to whom he was married in 1832, 
and who died August 31, 1886, and both of their children, a young 
son who died in 1840, and the late George P. Stevenson, who died May 
23, 1878 ; but he was affectionately cared for during the ill health of 
his later years by his nieces, Miss Amelia Stevenson and the late Mrs. 
Frank S. Thorn, who had lived with him after the death of their parents 
in their early childhood. The beautiful stained-glass window in St. 
Paul's, near the pulpit and facing the south aisle, is in memory of his 
late wife, Mrs. 'Amelia Geer Stevenson. (See page 294.) 

At a meeting of the vestry held May 8, 189 1, G. Hunter Bartlett 
was re-elected clerk of the vestry. 



I go History of St. Paul's Church. 

James W. Sanford's resignation as treasurer of the parish was 
then read, and the following resolutions in regard to it were unani- 
mously adopted, and a copy ordered sent to Mr. Sanford : 

"Resolved, That this vestry receives with great regret the resignation of Mr. James 
W. Sanford, who for twenty years has been the valued and efficient treasurer of the parish. 

"Resolved, That while we are constrained by Mr. Sanford's wishes to accept his 
resignation, we wish to assure him that we do so most unwillingly and with a full 
appreciation of the great services rendered to the parish in the office which he has so 
ably filled. 

" Resolved, That we offer to Mr. Sanford on this occasion the best wishes of every 
member of the vestry for his health and prosperity. " 

It was moved and carried that Philip Joyce be elected treasurer 
of the parish. 

On motion, the wardens were appointed a committee to negotiate 
for the transfer of the property of St. Andrew's Mission from the war- 
dens and vestry of St. Paul's Parish to the parish about to be formed. 

At a vestry meeting held June 5, 1891, it was reported for the com- 
mittee on placing a tablet in the new Temple Beth Zion on Delaware 
Avenue, that the tablet had been placed in the Temple, and was well 
executed and satisfactory. Rev. Henry A. Adams stated that the Rev. 
Dr. Aaron, Rabbi of the Temple, had written a cordial letter to him, 
acknowledging the gift. The inscription on the tablet is as follows : 

THIS TABLET 

IS PLACED HERE BY THE VESTRY OF 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, BUFFALO 

IN GRATEFUL ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

OF THE KINDNESS OF THE 

CONGREGATION 

TEMPLE BETH ZION 

IN TENDERING TO THE WARDENS AND 

VESTRY OF ST. PAUL's THE USE OF THE 

TEMPLE AFTER THE DESTRUCTION 

OF THE CHURCH BY FIRE, ON 

THE TENTH DAY OF MAY, 

1888. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 191 

November 23, 1891, at a meeting of the vestry, it was moved and 
carried : " That the rector and clerk be authorized to sign the necessary 
application to the court, and subsequently to sign the deed, for the 
transfer of the Spruce Street property, and that the clerk be authorized 
and directed to afifix the seal of the corporation thereto." This was 
therefore done-. The property on Spruce Street had been purchased 
by St. Paul's Church in 1875 for the purpose of erecting there a mis- 
sion chapel ; the chapel was built, and a mission, called St. Andrew's 
Mission, was carried on for fifteen years, principally supported by 
St. Paul's, and conducted by members of St. Paul's Guild and 
others. The mission grew in strength and importance and was, in 
189 1, duly incorporated under the name of St. Andrew's Church, 
Buffalo, N. Y., according to the provisions of the statute in such case 
made and provided, and was received into communion with the Protestant 
Episcopal Church. The rector, wardens and vestrymen of the new 
church therefore made application to St. Paul's to have the property 
transferred to them. (See pages 117 and 393.) They afterwards sold 
the Spruce Street property, and built a new St. Andrew's Church on 
Goodell Street. 

1892. 

February 9, 1892, at a meeting of the vestry, the resignation of 
the Rev. Henry A. Adams as rector of the parish was read, the resig- 
nation to take effect March i, 1892. The following resolutions were 
unanimously adopted : 

" Resolved, That the resignation of the Rev. Henry A. Adams of the rectorship of 
St. Paul's Church be and the same is hereby accepted, to take effect on the ist day of 
March, 1892. 

"Resolved, That we wish to place on record our appreciation of the intellectual 
force and ability which he has shown during his connection with this parish, and also 
of the earnestness and zeal displayed in the spiritual oversight of St. Paul's. 

"Resolved, That our best wishes attend him in his new and important field of 
labor." 



ig2 History of St. Paul's Church. 

The Rev. Henry A. Adams was born at Santiago de Cuba in 1861, 
and was therefore only twenty-eight years old when he became rector 
of St. Paul's in 1889. He had been first assistant minister of old 
Trinity Church, New York City, his duties there being chiefly confined 
to preaching, for three years before coming to Buffalo. On his resig- 
nation of the rectorship of St. Paul's he returned to New York, becom- 
ing rector of the Church of the Redeemer in that city. 

February 9, 1892, at the meeting of the vestry, the resignation of 
G. Hunter Bartlett as clerk of the vestry was read. He had asked 
some months before to be relieved, on account of lack of time for dis- 
charging the duties of clerk, and had handed in his formal resigna- 
tion in December, 1891, having been clerk since May i, 1885. On 
motion the resignation was accepted, " with the thanks of the vestry to 
Dr. G. Hunter Bartlett for his valuable and long-continued services." 

Charles R. Wilson was then unanimously elected clerk of the vestry. 

The following committee to obtain a new rector was appointed at 
this meeting : Mr. Walker, chairman ; Messrs. Thompson, Wilson, 
Barnard, Stringer, Smith and Hayes. On April 27th, Mr. Viele was 
added to the committee. 

The Rev. Arthur J. Fidler, assistant minister of the parish, became 
the minister in charge. 

April 18, 1892, Easter Monday, at the annual election, the following 
persons were chosen for wardens and vestrymen : William H. Walker 
and A. Porter Thompson, wardens ; John Pease, Albert J. Barnard, 
George Alfred Stringer, James R. Smith, Robert P. Wilson, Edmund 
Hayes, James Sweeney and Sheldon T. Viele. 

At a meeting of the vestry held April 27, 1892, Charles R.Wilson 
was re-elected clerk of the vestry, and Philip Joyce treasurer of 
the parish. 

At the same meeting a letter was read from the Rev. Arthur J. 
Fidler, resigning the office of assistant minister in charge of St. Paul's, 
the resignation to take effect April 30th, in view of the fact that he 
had accepted a call to the rectorship of Christ Church, Greenburg, Pa., 
upon the duties of which he expected to enter May i, 1892. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 193 

The vestry unanimously resolved : 

" Whereas, the Rev. Arthur J. Fidler, assistant minister of this parish, has ten- 
dered his resignation to take effect on the 30th inst. Therefore be it, 

"Resolved, That in accepting the resignation of Mr. Fidler, it is a simple act of 
justice to express to him our appreciation of his valuable services in the position he 
has held. Since the rector left us his duties have been especially arduous and have 
been most faithfully performed. Our best wishes will follow him in the parish at 
Greenburg, and we hope he may have many happy and prosperous years before him. " 

At this meeting the applications of nineteen men of the parish for 
certificates recommending them to the bishop for license as Lay Read- 
ers were presented to the vestry ; the applications were approved and 
the certificates signed, the names being as follows : 

Judge James M. Smith, Robert P. Wilson, Matthew D. Mann, M. D., 
Thomas F. Lothrop, M. D., Edward C. Walker, Francis S. White, 
Frank W. Abbott, M. D., O. H. P. Champlin, Wm. H. Chapin, Howard 
T. Cornwell, Henry A. Dann, Wm. F. Dent, Henry S. Gatley, Henry 
R. Hopkins, M. D., Montgomery A. Crockett, M. D., Alex. S. Hallo- 
well, John B. Higgins, Philip S. Smith and Charles R. Wilson. Sep- 
tember 16, 1892, the names of Harry S. Sizer and James A. Lep- 
per were added to this list. These applications grew out of the 
organization of the Layman's Missionary League, and were in accord- 
ance with its regulations. 

At a meeting of the vestry, July i, 1892, the resignation of Philip 
Joyce as treasurer of the parish was read, and a vote of thanks 
was extended to him for his faithful and diligent discharge of his 
duties as treasurer. It was then moved and carried that William A. 
Joyce be elected treasurer of the parish. 

Having accepted the call to the rectorate of St. Paul's, the Rev. 
Jacob A. Regester arrived in Buffalo on Tuesday, July 5, 1892, and 
began his work in the parish. He preached his first sermon as rector 
of St. Paul's on the following Sunday, July loth. Mr. Regester, with his 
family, came to Buffalo from Washington, D. C, where he had been the 
rector of St. John's Church, Georgetown parish. For several years of 
his earlier ministry he had been assistant at Grace Church, Baltimore. 



194 History of St. Paul's Church. 

At the vestry meeting of September i6, 1892, the Hon. James M. 
Smith, W. H. Walker and Dr. H. R. Hopkins were chosen delegates to the 
Diocesan Council to be held at Trinity Chapel, Buffalo, September 20th. 

At a special meeting of the vestry, held on Monday, October 17, 
1892, the following minute was presented by Mr. Walker, and, on 
motion, unanimously adopted : 

" The vestry of St. Paul's Church have received the intelligence of the death of 
Robert P. Wilson, who for nearly ten years has been a member of this body, with 
profound sorrow. Our friend and associate was a man of most attractive personal 
qualities, he possessed a certain nobility of character which endeared him to all, and 
especially to those who, like ourselves, came in close contact with him. 

" He was one of the most faithful and valuable members of this vestry, nearly 
always present at its meetings, and ready at all times to give his counsel and labor to 
the interest of St. Paul's Parish. 

" This was especially the case during the important work of rebuilding the church. 
He accepted the responsible ofEce of treasurer of the Building Fund, and discharged 
the duties of that position with remarkable fidelity and the most perfect accuracy. 
For his services in that capacity the parish owes him a debt of gratitude and affection. " 

Robert Preston Wilson, one of Buffalo's best-known lawyers, died 
in Buffalo, October 15, 1892. He was born in Sackett's Harbor, N. Y., 
and was the son of the Rev. George S. Wilson and Julia Preston 
Wilson, and grandson of Robert Wilson, an ofificer in the War of the 
Revolution, by inheritance from whom he was a member of the Order 
of the Cincinnati, being the only member of that historic order in Buffalo. 

He was graduated from Williams College in i860. In 1861 he en- 
listed as a private in the i6th New York Volunteers, of which he was 
afterwards made adjutant, and took part in the battle of Bull Run. In 
1862 he was appointed Assistant Adjutant- General of General Joseph 
J. Bartlett's brigade, the 6th Army Corps, of which his regiment formed 
a part, and in that capacity served in General McClellan's Peninsular 
campaign in 1862. In 1863 Mr. Wilson was commissioned major of the 
i2ist New York Regiment, but declined the appointment, and retained 
his position on General Bartlett's staff. With the Army of the Potomac 




REVEREND J. A. REGESTER, S. 
Rector of St. Paul's from July 5, 1892. 



T. r^. 



Photograph by Jansen, October, 1902. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 195 

he took part in several famous battles. He was severely wounded in 
1863, and was honorably discharged from the service for permanent 
disability in February, 1864. 

Mr. Wilson came to Buffalo in the spring of the same year and 
entered the law office of Ganson & Smith, as a student. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1866. In 1873, Mr. Wilson, Charles D. Marshall 
and Spencer Clinton established the law firm of Marshall, Clinton & 
Wilson, which built up a very large and important legal business. 
Mr. Wilson was married in 1868 to Miss Margaret L., only daughter of 
the Hon. James M. Smith. Mrs. Wilson survives him, as does also 
his nephew and adopted son, Charles Robert Wilson. 

In October, 1892, it was decided by the vestry to press the claim of 

St. Paul's Church against the Buffalo Natural Gas Fuel Company for 

damages sustained in the destruction of the church. May 10, 1888. 

The following letter was sent : 

"Buffalo, Oct. 26, 1892. 
"Daniel O'Day, Esq., President, etc. 

"Dear Sir, — The vestry of St. Paul's Church having been informed that the Natural 
Gas Fuel Company has settled the claims of the insurance companies growing out of 
the destruction of the church in May, 1888, deem it their duty to present to the com- 
pany the claim of the church for the loss sustained beyond the amount of the insurance. 
The amount of this loss is about $14,000. This sum does not include any allowance 
for the damage sustained by the church in being deprived of the use of it for nearly 
two years. The members of St. Paul's and others, yourself among the number, sub- 
scribed very liberally towards the restoration of the church. More than $130,000 
was expended for that purpose, and, notwithstanding the sacrifices and generosity 
of the subscribers, the vestry find themselves incumbered with a debt of nearly 
$15,000. I present this matter to you in the full confidence that your company will 
certainly be willing to regard as favorably the claim of St. Paul's Church as that of the 

insurance companies. 

" I remain very respectfully yours, etc., 

"(Signed.) WILLIAM H. WALKER, 

" Warden, St. Paul's Church." 

In November, 1892 the Rev. N. S. Stephens became assistant to 
the rector. 



196 History of St. Paul's Church. 

1893. 

February 24, 1893, it was decided by the vestry, in view of a deficit 
in the funds of the parish, that a circular letter should be sent to the 
individual members of St. Paul's, asking them for subscriptions to put 
the parish in a better financial position. The deficit, as stated in the 
circular, was about $3,000, and the causes of this excess of expenditure 
were exceptional. The rector, the Rev. Mr. Regester, having circu- 
lated the subscription paper, on Easter Sunday, April 2, 1893, the sub- 
scription, together with a large offering, amounted to more than the 
sum asked by the vestry. 

On Easter Monday, April 3, 1893, the following persons were 
elected by the parish : William H. Walker and A. Porter Thompson, 
wardens ; and John Pease, Albert J. Barnard, George Alfred Stringer, 
James R. Smith, Edmund Hayes, James Sweeney, Sheldon T. Viele 
and Hobart Weed, vestrymen. On April 14th, at a meeting of the ves- 
try, Charles R. Wilson was re-elected clerk of the vestry and William 
A. Joyce was re-elected treasurer of the parish. 

At the vestry meeting, held April 25, 1893, it was reported by 
Messrs. Walker, Thompson and Viele, the committee having the mat- 
ter in charge, that the Buffalo Natural Gas Fuel Company would 
settle with the parish for the damages to the church by the explosion 
of natural gas on May 10, 1888, for the sum of $7,500 in cash. It was 
decided by the vestry to accept this amount rather than undertake 
the large expense and uncertainty of a legal contest. The rector and 
clerk of the vestry were therefore authorized to execute under their 
hands a general release of all claims for damages, which was done, 
and the sum of $7,500 was paid into the treasury of the church. 

At the same meeting, Charles R. Wilson was elected treasurer of St. 
Paul's Church Building Fund to fill the vacancy caused by the death 
of the former treasurer, Robert P. Wilson. 

Under the auspices of the Laymen's Missionary League, a series 
of six Wednesday evening sermons, suggested and arranged by 



History of St. Paul's Church. 197 

Bishop Coxe, and known as the " Sermons for the Columbian Year," 
was preached at St. Paul's, Buffalo, during the spring and early summer 
of 1893. These sermons were delivered by some of the most eminent 
bishops and clergymen of the Church, and were, without exception, 
brilliant and able. The speakers and their subjects were as follows : 

General subject and title, "The Holy Catholic Church" and Her American 
Daughter. 

1st. America the Study of Nations ; Her Religious Destiny. Bishop Perry of 
Iowa, April 5th. 

2d. Denominationalism, Past, Present and Future. Bishop Thompson of Mis- 
sissippi, April 26th. 

3d. The Church Catholic from the Beginning of the World. Bishop Coxe of 
Western New York, May loth. 

4th. Public Worship, Traditional, Hebrew, Christian, in America, Past, Present 
and Future. Bishop Seymour of Springfield, III., May 24th. 

5th. The Church Catholic and Learning, Letters, Art, Science, Constitutional 
Government. Prof. William Clark, M. A. Oxon., LL. D., June 7th. 

6th. The Church and Society, the Family, the Nation, the World, Incarnation 
the Common Bond of Humanity. Bishop Garrett of Northern Texas, June 21st. 

At the vestry meeting of August 4, 1893, W. H. Walker, James 
Sweeney and O. H. P. Champlin were appointed delegates to the Dio- 
cesan Council to be held in Rochester in September. 

In 1893, Sister Frances, who had for some time been connected 
with the Church Home in Buffalo, was appointed as Deaconess in St. 
Paul's Church. 

In September, 1893, Lorenzo Harris succeeded William Graveson 
as sexton. 

On December 6, 1893, the parish was saddened to hear of the death 
of Mrs. Edith Kimberly Walker, the wife of the Senior Warden of the 
parish, William H. Walker. Mrs. Walker was the youngest daughter 
of the late John L. Kimberly, and from childhood until the time of her 
death was one of the most faithful members of St. Paul's. 

" It was in a life rich in charitable and benevolent work that Mrs. 
Walker became best known to the people of the city. Not only was 



igS History of St. Paul's Church. 

she the constant associate of her husband, who has always been among 
the foremost in every good work, but in the many charities of the 
church which she loved so well her presence was always a power. For 
two years she was president of the Missionary and Relief Society, which 
flourished and increased its power for good during her administration 
of its affairs. She was also one of the managers of the Diet Kitchen, 
and one of the board of associate managers of the Church Charity 
Foundation. There were in the city few women whose lovable char- 
acter and sincere christian devotion were understood and appreciated 
by a larger circle of friends." 

Besides her husband, Mrs. Walker leaves three children, two sons 
and a daughter. 

On December 8th the vestry of the church unanimously adopted the 
following memorial and resolution relative to the death of Mrs. Walker : 

" The vestry of St. Paul's Church has learned with sorrow of the death of Edith 
Kimberly Walker, wife of our senior warden . 

" Mrs. Walker has been a life-long member of St. Paul's. Baptised in the church, 
her life has been devoted to a constant and consistent support of its principles and 
practice. 

" Her unostentatious kindness and her cheerful and faithful performance of duty 
have endeared her to all in the parish. Her loss will be deeply felt and sincerely 
mourned by all who knew her. We trust that the beauty of her example will inspire 
others to take up the work which she has laid down. 

" Resolved, That we tender to her husband and family our deep sympathy in their 
affliction, and assure them that the parish mourns with them in our common loss." 

December 8, 1893, the rector was authorized by the vestry to incur 
the necessary expense in printing a " Year Book " of the parish. This 
was accordingly done, and the first " Year Book " of St. Paul's was 
issued, dated Advent, 1893. It was written and admirably compiled by 
the rector, the Rev. Mr. Regester, and gives full information of the con- 
dition of the parish, its organization, its numerical and financial 
strength, the names and purposes of its various societies, guilds, etc., 
and was very valuable and' instructive to every parishioner. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 199 

1894. 

On Easter Monday, March 26, 1894, the following persons were 
elected by the parish : William H. Walker and A. Porter Thompson, 
wardens; and John Pease, Albert J. Barnard, James R. Smith, Edmund 
Hayes, James Sweeney, Sheldon T. Viele, Hobart Weed and Charles 
R Wilson, vestrymen. 

April 6, 1894, at a meeting of the vestry, Charles R. Wilson was re- 
elected clerk of the vestry, and William A. Joyce treasurer of the parish. 

June 28, 1894, Hobart College conferred the degree of S. T. D. 
(Doctor of Sacred Theology) on the Rev. J. A. Regester, the rector 
of St. Paul's Church, — a well merited honor, and one which gave 
much pleasure to the many friends of the able and beloved rector of 
the parish. 

July 20, 1894, Mrs. Louisa M. Weed died, in her ninety-second year. 
She had, at the time of her death, lived longer in Buffalo than any 
other person in the city, and she was also the oldest member of St. 
Paul's Parish. Her life covers almost the entire history of the city, 
and she lived here when the place was called New Amsterdam. Mrs. 
Weed was about eleven years old when Buffalo was burned by the 
British in 1813, and she remembered the event vividly. She was a 
daughter of Dr. Cyrenius Chapin, and wife of Thaddeus Weed, whom 
she survived many years. They had three children, the late DeWitt 
C. Weed, the late Mrs.* Louisa Weed Hale, and Hobart Weed, who 
survives his mother. (See pages 13, 120, 121.) 

December 2, 1894, being the first Sunday in Advent, the pledge, or 
envelope, system of offerings was introduced into the parish. 

1895. 

March 9, 1895, the vestry decided to purchase the property. No. 61 
Johnson's Park, known as the David S. Bennett house, for the pur- 
poses of a rectory for the parish. 



200 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



April 15, 1895, being Easter Monday, at a meeting of the congre- 
gation, held in the church, the following church wardens and vestry- 
men were elected : 

William H. Walker, senior warden, A. Porter Thompson, junior 
warden ; John JPease, Albert J. Barnard, Edmund Hayes, James 
Sweeney, Sheldon T. Viele, James R. Smith, Hobart Weed and Charles 
R. Wilson, vestrymen. 

April 23, 189s, at a meeting of the vestry, Charles R. Wilson was 
elected clerk of the vestry and William A. Joyce treasurer of the 
parish, for the ensuing year. 

In the report of the finance committee, presented to the vestry at 
this meeting, is the following :...." We wish to put on record the 
important purchase made .... of a rectory in Johnson's Park. A 
house, every way adapted to the purpose, was bought for $20,000. 
$5, 000 was paid down, and the balance is on bond and mortgage at 
five per cent. The $5,000 was raised by subscription." .... The 
vestry felt justified in making the purchase at this time and assuming 
this debt, as the rector offered to pay personally the interest on the 
mortgage and one-half the taxes ; this was not intended to be a per- 
manent arrangement, but was to last only until the parish should be in 
a position to relieve the rector from this responsibility. (See page 242.) 



IRectors jfunb Subscription. 



A Friend, .... 
Mrs. Robert P. Wilson, 
Mrs. Laetitia P. Viele, 
Mrs. Mary Evans, 
Mrs. Agnes L. Warren, 
Mrs. Clara B. Warren, 
Mrs. Van Bokkelen, 
George C. Greene, 
Robert Palen, . . 
E. H. Hatchinson, 
James Sweeney, . 
Edmund Hayes, . 



% 25.00 

100.00 

150.00 

200.00 
100.00 

50.00 
100.00 

100.00 

50.00 
500.00 
250.00 
500.00 



Edward Bennett, . ... $200.00 

S. Douglas Cornell 100.00 

William Y. Warren, .... 50.00 

Mrs. George H. Bryant, . . 100.00 

James R. Smith, 500.00 

A. P. Thompson, 300.00 

M. D. Mann, 100.00 

W. H. Walker, ... . 500.00 

A, J. Barnard 200 00 

James M. Smith 500.00 

Hobart Weed 250.00 

H. R. Hopkins 100 00 

$5,025.00 



a X 

P w 

n 

a. -^ 

- 50 

W 

a o 



s 1 







History of St. Paul' s Church. 20i 

In the report of the finance committee, mentioned above, is also 
the following : " To speak again of the working of the pledge system : 
We have received on the twenty-one Sundays it has been in operation, 
$2,173.40; the amount of pledges unpaid is very small indeed, and 
it seems to have the elements of certainty and regularity to a 
remarkable extent." .... 

May 6, 1895, at a meeting of the vestry of St. Paul's Church, held 
at the Parish House, Mr. Walker stated that the sad intelligence had 
been received of the death of Mrs. Matilda C. Thompson, wife of the 
junior warden of the parish, and moved the following resolutions, 
which were unanimously adopted : 

" Resolved, That the vestry of St. Paul's Church have heard with profound sorrow 
the announcement of the death of Mrs. Matilda C. Thompson, the wife of the junior 
warden of this parish. Mrs. Thompson has been for many years a member of St. 
Paul's, and will be deeply regretted. In all the relations of life she illustrated the best 
qualities of a pure and exalted character. Her faithful devotion to her family and 
friends was known of all, and she leaves a memory that will be cherished by all who 
knew her. 

"Resolved, That we wish to offer to her husband and family the assurances of our 
heartfelt sympathy." 

At the same meeting W. H. Walker, Dr. H. R. Hopkins and James 
Sweeney were appointed delegates to the Diocesan Council, to be held 
at Lockport, May 20, 1895. 

In July, 1895, died James W. Sanford. For many years Mr. and 
Mrs. Sanford were prominent members of St. Paul's, and valued 
friends and neighbors of the late Dr. Shelton. Mr. Sanford was 
treasurer of the parish from 1871 until 1891. He was nearly eighty 
years of age at the time of his death, and had lived in Buffalo since 1836. 

The third "Year Book" of the parish, dated Advent, 1895, states 
that the present number of communicants is 802. 

In November, 1895, the Rev. John S. Littell came to St. Paul's as 
assistant to the rector, succeeding the Rev. N. S. Stephens, who had 
resigned the position in August. 



202 History of St. Paul's Church. 

1896. 

March 21, 1896, the following resolutions, relative to a change in 
the day of election of the vestry, were adopted : 

" Resolved, That this vestry recommend that the date of the annual election of this 
corporation be changed from Monday in Easter week to Monday in the week begin- 
ning with the First Sunday in Advent ; that the number of vestrymen be changed 
from eight to nine ; and that the terms of the churchwardens be changed so that one 
warden shall be elected annually. 

" Resolved, That this vestry recommend that the qualifications of voters, and the 
qualifications of wardens and vestrymen of this corporation, be changed to conform 
in both cases to the requirements of Section 30 of Chapter 723 of the Laws of this 
State, passed in the year 1895." 

At a meeting of the congregation of St. Paul's, held in the church 
on Easter Monday, April 6, 1896, the rector, the Rev. Dr. J. A. Reg- 
ester, presiding, the following persons were elected wardens and ves- 
trymen for the ensuing year : 

William H. Walker, Senior Warden, A. Porter Thompson, Junior 
Warden ; Vestrymen, John Pease, Albert J. Barnard, Edmund Hayes, 
James Sweeney, Sheldon T. Viele, James R. Smith, Hobart Weed, 
Charles R. Wilson. 

At the meeting of the congregation, held as stated, on Easter 
Monday, April 6, 1896, the resolutions adopted at the vestry meeting 
of March 21, 1896, were publicly read and submitted to the meeting, 
and the meeting thereupon ratified the same by a vote of nineteen in 
favor thereof and no votes against the same. The Monday next after 
the First Sunday in Advent was the date determined on by said meet- 
ing for the annual election of the parish ; nine was the number of 
vestrymen decided on by said meeting, and it was also determined to 
thereafter elect churchwardens so that the term of one warden will 
expire annually. 

This altering of the old custom of the parish seemed best in view of 
the fact that, following the passage of the State law in 1895, making 



History of St. Paul's Church. 203 

it legal for the Protestant Episcopal churches of the State to make this 
change, most of the prominent parishes of the State had availed 
themselves of the right to do so. Advent Sunday being the beginning 
of the Church Year, the change seemed a fitting one. 

Easter Monday had been the day of election at St. Paul's since the 
foundation of the parish, the meeting of Monday, February 10, 181 7, 
for the organization of the parish and the election of the first vestry, 
having resolved unanimously: " That Easter Monday hereafter be the 
day for the annual election of their successors, and that the said 
church be known and distinguished by the name of St. Paul's Church 
in Buffalo." 

(See page 9, this volume.) 

For some time a movement had been on foot among the women of 
St. Paul's for the building of a new Parish House. This movement 
having received the approval of the authorities of the parish, a com- 
mittee of women was formed representing the different parish organiza- 
tions most interested in having a building better suited to the various 
branches of parish work ; and the securing of subscriptions for the 
necessary funds was enthusiastically begun. 

At the vestry meeting of April 20, 1896, the rector stated that the 
women of the parish who had in charge the work of raising a fund for 
the erection of a new Parish House had already secured subscrip- 
tions amounting in the aggregate to more than $20,000, and he asked 
that a committee might be appointed to take charge of the construction 
of the new building. On motion of Mr. Walker, it was resolved : " That 
a building committee, consisting of Edmund Hayes, chairman, and 
Horatio C. Harrower and Charles R. Wilson, be appointed with full 
power to construct a new Parish House on the site of the present 
one, to cost when completed not more than $20,000." On motion of 
Mr. Weed, the rector and Mr. Walker were added to the building 
committee. 

At the same meeting, W. H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson and Dr. 
Henry R. Hopkins were appointed delegates to the Diocesan Conven- 



204 History of St. Paul's Church. 

tion to be held in Buffalo, May 19, 1896. Charles R. Wilson was 
elected clerk of the vestry, and William A. Joyce treasurer of the par- 
ish for the ensuing year. 

On Monday, July 20, 1896, the news was received in Buffalo of the 
sudden death, at the Sanitarium at Clifton Springs, N. Y., of the Rt. 
Rev. Arthur Cleveland Coxe, Bishop of the Diocese of Western New 
York. 

Bishop Coxe had been somewhat exhausted and prostrated by his 
pastoral and other manifold duties, and had gone from his home in 
Buffalo, with Mrs. Coxe, to Chfton Springs for rest, on July 8th. He 
was apparently much improved in health, and was about to return to 
Buffalo, when the summons came, and he sank quietly and painlessly 
into rest. The bishop was born May 10, 1818, and was therefore sev- 
enty-eight years of age. 

A short account of the principal events in his most useful and beau- 
tiful life will be found at page 98 of this volume. 

The body of the bishop was taken in solemn procession from Clif- 
ton Springs to Geneva on Tuesday afternoon at four o'clock, following 
a simple service which had been held in the chapel of the Sanitarium. 
The procession was met on the outskirts of Geneva by the local clergy, 
and it was nearly seven o'clock in the evening when they reached the 
ivy-clad Trinity Church, where a brief service was held, the Rev. Dr. 
Nelson officiating. The lying in state was in Trinity Church. The 
coffin of oak, the top bevelled in the form of the cross, was placed just 
before the chancel of the old church, where thirty-one years before the 
dead bishop had been consecrated to the Episcopate. This was done 
in compliance with his wish, often expressed, that his body after death 
and before burial might rest at the altar-step where he took his solemn 
consecration vows. 

The body was clothed in the vestments in which he had been con- 
secrated bishop, and by his side was his long- used bishop's staff, of 
wood. While in the church the casket was covered with a purple pall, 




BISHOP COXE. 



?Vom a photopraph b)' rr\in(,' Saunders, 
Rochciiter, N. V , taken about iMq2. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 205 

two branches of palm crossed at the foot, and at the head his bishop's 
mitre. The plate on the coffin bore the inscription : 

ARTHUR CLEVELAND COXE, 
Born, May 10, 1818. 
Died, July 20, 1896. 

After the customary weekly communion had been celebrated, the 
coffin at the foot of the chancel was opened, and the people were 
admitted. Great numbers came, old and young, rich and poor, to look 
upon the noble and well-beloved face of their dead bishop. 

The vestry of Trinity acted as a guard of honor ; and six of the 
clergy of the diocese, two for each night, kept constant and loving 
watch in the church through the hours of darkness. 

The funeral services were held in Trinity Church, Geneva, N. Y., 
on Friday, July 24, 1896. No sermon was preached or eulogy pro- 
nounced ; following Bishop Coxe's often- expressed wish, the service 
was as unostentatious as possible, in accordance with the custom of the 
Church which buries priest and layman, rich and poor, with the same 
simple, beautiful words. He counted it one of the glories of the 
Church that all are equal in life and in death : 

" Our Mother the Church hath never a child 

To honour before the rest, 
But she singeth the same for mighty kings 

And the veriest babe on her breast ; 
And the bishop goes down to his narrow bed 

As the ploughman's child is laid. 
And alike she blesseth the dark-browed serf 

And the chief in his robes arrayed." 

The bishop's body was laid to rest by the side of the graves of 
three of his children, in the plot of ground set apart in the quiet church- 
yard of Trinity, by act of the vestry and permission of the local 
authorities, as the private burial place for Bishop Coxe and the mem- 
bers of his family. 



2o6 History of St. Paul's Church. 

In his youth, in his "Christian Ballads," he had sung : 

" I would sleep where the church-bells aye ring out, 
I would rise by the house of prayer. . . . 

let me rest in the churchyard then, 
And hard by the church's gate ; 

'Tis there I pray to my Saviour Christ, 

And I will, till mine eye is dim, 

That, sleep as I may in this fevered life, 

1 may rest, at last, in Him." 

Mrs. Coxe did not long survive her husband, but died February i6, 
1898, and was buried at his side in Trinity churchyard, Geneva, N. Y. 

The passing away of Bishop Coxe called forth a great number 
of tributes from men of other faiths and from men of no faith, as 
well as from those of his own communion. With his most remarkable 
gifts as a scholar, poet, and citizen of the world, with his cultured 
manners of a school which is unfortunately fast passing away, all of 
which would have brought him distinction in any secular walk of life 
he might have chosen, he bent, instead, all his abilities and energies 
and gifts to the up-building of Christ's Church, with a faith as simple, 
as beautiful and as unshaken as that of a little child, but illuminated 
by a learning and a capacity for depth of thought and reasoning 
which few possess. 

In his poems, and especially in his " Christian Ballads," first pub- 
lished in 1840, the ofifices and accessories of the services of the Church 
seem to burst forth into bloom like Aaron's rod. At a time in this 
country when much in the services and appointments of the Church 
seemed lacking in a due sense of beauty, the text applied to these 
poems seemed particularly appropriate : 

" He appointed singers before the Lord, that should praise the 
Beauty of Holiness." 

This sense of the sacred beauty underlying and vivifying the serv- 
ices and ideas of the Church, going hand in hand with his priestly 
consecration, was to some extent the natural outcome of his deeply 



History of St. Paul's Church. 237 

poetical nature, which saw beauty in all the works of God ; but his 
expression of that feeling, an expression at once manly and most 
devotional, was unique at the time, and has been a potent factor in 
bringing many into the Church, and in reanimating the loyalty of 
churchmen. 

The beauty and dignity of his face and bearing typified most truly 
the beauty of his mind and heart, and the clear flame of his soul. It 
has been well said of him that " by his example he speaks to every 
layman, calling him to wear upon his breast ' the white flower of 
a blameless life.' " 

A solemn memorial service for the late Bishop Coxe was held 
in St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, on the evening of Monday, October 
5, 1896. The church was filled to its utmost capacity by a large con- 
gregation, many of whom stood during the entire service. 

The procession as it entered the church was most impres- 
sive. The combined choirs of St. Paul's and the Church of the 
Ascension came first, singing the hymn, " Hark ! Hark ! my Soul," 
preceded by the crucifer and acolytes. About one hundred clergy of 
the diocese followed, accompanied by numbers of clergymen from 
other dioceses. Last in the procession was the Rt. Rev. William Cros- 
well Doane, Bishop of Albany. After the Evening Service had been 
sung, the Rev. Arthur C. Powell, rector of Grace Church, Baltimore, 
who came to Buffalo especially to represent that church, read a memo- 
rial prepared by the vestry of his parish, in which they expressed their 
sympathy with the Diocese of Western New York. He then gave an 
eloquent account of the good work done by Bishop Coxe during his 
rectorate at Grace Church from 1854 to 1863, and of the love and 
veneration in which his memory is held there. 

The chancel of St. Paul's was filled with the white-vested clergy, 
and many ministers of the different denominations in the city occupied 
the front pews reserved for them, and took this opportunity of showing 
their respect to the memory of one who had wielded so strong an 
influence on all thinking men about him. Bishop Doane made the 



2o8 History of St. Paul's Church. 

memorial address, which was a masterly one, a most eloquent and 
moving tribute to the memory of the beloved bishop who for over 
thirty years had been the Diocesan of Western New York, and one of 
the strong men of the Church. 

It is only possible to give here a few passages from the address of 
Bishop Doane, but these are so characteristic and so appreciative of 
him who so often ministered to the people of what he took pleasure in 
calling his Cathedral Church, that it seems most fitting to preserve them 
here. Bishop Doane took for his text the words from I. Corinthians : 

" I thank my God always on your behalf for the grace of God which is given you 
by Jesus Christ : That in everything ye are enriched by Him, in all utterance, and in 
all knowledge." 

He said in part : 

. . . . " Sad-hearted in the present, .... there is neither sadness nor anxious- 
ness as we look back, for we are looking back upon the path of the righteous, the 
path of the shining light, that shineth more and more unto the perfect day. We 
thank our God on this and on every remembrance of him with joy, for the Grace of 
God that was given him by Jesus Christ. 

" I need hardly say that the words of this passage, descriptive of that Church, 
which, more than any other, was endowed with a real coruscation of extraordinary 
splendor in its gifts, lie out before us in three lines of thought — richness, utterance, 
knowledge — and apply themselves in three salient features of the dead bishop's char- 
acter — who, being dead, yet speaketh — in the wealth of his spiritual and natural 
endowments, in the wide range and accuracy of his learning, and in the force and 
felicity of his speech 

" You do not care to hear me deal to-night with the dates and details of his life. 
That must be left for the larger and fuller record which some careful and skillful hand 

will make, I trust, ere long But so far as this preaching is concerned, I have 

to deal with general effects and not with the sidelights or the shadows that fill in the 
finished outline. A man who walks along a lovely road, bordered with beauty at 
every step, and tracing its way on and up to even fairer scenes, is not concerned with, 
and does not notice, the mere mile stones which mark a distance that he does not feel, 
and measure intervals over which he is in no haste to pass 

" You will forgive me if I speak of your late bishop more in this larger relation to 
the whole Church than in his relation as to your diocese. His estimate of his office 
was, in my judgment, the rightful one. He was consecrated ' a bishop in the Church 



History of St. Paul's Church. 209 

of God.' The field of his personal and immediate duty was, of course, in the diocese 
which he first shared with the great DeLancey, and then succeeded him in its full care. 
But the diocesan bishop is, first of all, a bishop in the Church of God. No detail of 
visitation, of administration, of travel, may be neglected therefor ; but he had no 
sympathy — and I have none — with the measurement of Episcopal service by the 
number of miles traveled, or the number of parishes visited, or the number of persons 
confirmed. Like the mint and anise and cummin of the Pharisees, all these things 
are to be done, and he did them patiently, faithfully, and most acceptably 

' ' And so the great heart of your bishop reached out to the struggling little church 
in Hayti, whose cradling days he nursed and tended ; beat with a far higher and truer 
than Byronic enthusiasm for the ancient Church of Greece ; honored and loved and 
longed for closer communion with the mother Church of England ; did valiant battle 
more than once at Lambeth and in the councils of our own Church by speech and by 
letter for the rights of the Old Catholics in Germany and Switzerland ; prayed and 
labored and contended for the restoration of the liberties and loyalties to primitive 
truth and order of the old Galilean Chi(rch ; stood with unquenchable zeal, even when 
some of the idols were rudely shattered, for the movement in Mexico for interior 
reform ; and labored and longed to break the barriers down which part us from our 
brothers in other Christian bodies 

' ' Enriched ! Is not this first a thought of soils ; not those which years of cost 
and toil have reclaimed into a partial fertileness from dryness of sand, or hardness of 
rock, or shallowness of earth ; but just a natural bit of ground, a virgin soil of inex- 
haustible depth, which answers instantly to every seed that falls from the wing of 
passing breeze or flying bird, or from the careless flinging of the sower's hand ; and 
answers to every drop of rain and every beam of sunshine, and every pearl of dew, 
with the quick response of instant greenness, which grows faster even than the sea- 
sons fly, into the golden glory of an early harvest He had that rare respon- 
siveness in his nature which kept his eye and ear awake, and opened every pore of his 
whole being to receive the influence of the place, the moment, the surrounding. Sen- 
sitive as a strung harp to every breath of wind, to every lightest finger touch, and 
catching as the mirror of a still woodland lake, every tree leaf, every folding of 
the mountains, every fleeciest cloud, to reproduce it in reflection ; and ready to move 
in instant ripples with the least breath of wind that ruffled its surface. It was this 
that made his pastoral power so great, by his quick sympathy, his ability to enter into 
and share in whatever interested the person with whom he dealt 

" Knowledge ! First among the natural and the spiritual endowments of your 
bishop wherewith he was most enriched in knowledge, I should count, speaking not of 
physical and external characteristics, which were abundantly bestowed upon him, the 
unusual eagerness of acquisition, the accurate thoroughness of retaining, and the 



2IO History of St. Paul's Church. 

instantaneous readiness of recalling, which marked the operation of his mind. His 
knowledge of the Holy Scriptures was deep and devout. His spirit, so in accord 
with the Holy Spirit of God, caught their inner meaning with a quickness which 
opened new revelations to his soul ; and his own poetic gifts were perpetually flashing 
sparks of light from some new kindling of a passage of God's Word. ' Mighty in 
the Scriptures,' he certainly was one of the class of minds, with whom, when as they 
walk sad, oftentimes, in twilight meditations, the Master joins himself, as to the two at 
Emmaus, and opens the Scripture to their eyes, and their eyes to the Scripture, till 
they see Him. As a student of Patristic Theology, he had few equals in America, 
and his familiarity with the Fathers not only made him a difficult and dangerous 
antagonist in theological controversy, but enabled him to do great service to English 
students by his work in connection with the editing of the Anti-Nicene Fathers. And 
what he did not know about the Petrine claims and the Roman assumptions in Scrip- 
ture, Council and History was not worth knowing. His knowledge in liturgies was 
very thorough and full, and his ear was quick to catch the perfect rhythm of praise 
and word, which so absolutely marks off, plainly as poetry is marked off from prose, 
the language of a liturgy from the pompous verbosity of most modern prayers. 

"He was an expert in the domain of ecclesiastical history. The story of the Church 
from the beginning, and the story of the Churches, whether in France, or Spain, or 
England, or in the older East, he knew, as an intelligent patriot knows the story of his 
own country — and for the same reason, namely, the patriotism and intelligence of his 
citizenship of the Civitas Dei. 

" And outside of all this he had the most perfect familiarity with English history 
and English literature, which lent great beauty to his own choice language, gave 
charm and variety to his conversation, and the power of illustration and quotation 
ready and apt, which flavored his speech with treasures of fact and expression. And 
all these things, which he had easily acquired and accurately remembered, were at his 
instant command. Whatever may be said or thought of his prepared sermons, his 
unprepared, unexpected, sudden and spontaneous speeches sparkled with a brilliancy 
that caught every color of the rainbow, and bristled with an array of facts and refer- 
ences which commanded the attention and admiration of all who heard him. I have 
never heard from any man such an array of precedents and authorities of Scriptural 
quotations, references to Canon Law, old and new, of judicial decisions, of historical 
instances, all uttered in words that burned and glowed with tenderness and intensity, 
as the bishops will remember, in a speech of his which had not a moment for prepara- 
tion, in council at Minneapolis last October, during the session of the general conven- 
tion, at which meeting he seemed to me fresher and brighter and clearer than he had 
for several years before, as though his very sorrows had sublimated his spiritual pow- 
ers, and the lamp w as leaping to a brighter flame before it flickered to its fading spark. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 211 

" Utterance ! The current that set most strongly through the natural temperament 
of the bishop was the poetic current, in the best sense of that word, and it had its 
spring and rise neither in Arathusa or Castaly, but in ' Siloa's brook, which flows fast 
by the oracle of God.' Now the poetic nature is not only creative and not chiefly 

imaginative, It is intensely the gift of the seer And when the seer speaks, 

he not only reveals but prophesies. Eminently Bishop Coxe had this gift, for he was 
a true poet. And when he wrote ' Dreamland,' fifty years ago, he was seeing and 
prophesying. Whatever dreams he dreamed were, like Jacob's in a sleep that was 
pillowed upon stone, in much hardness and loneliness, in the sense of Divine presence, 
and with the full realization of the old Homeric thought, 'the dream is from God.' 
We forget, who have fallen into the easy heritage of religious truths accepted, of 
ecclesiastical privileges assured, of the glory of Catholic theology acknowledged, and 
of Catholic worship adopted, we forget the farsight and foresight, the clearness of 
wisdom and the courage of utterance, which belonged to the leaders of fifty years ago. 
A thousand familiar and undisputed things to-day were not only disputed but denied 
then ; and in that line of men, of whom Seabury and Hobart were the first, and my 
father and Bishop Whittingham their successors in the older generation. Bishop Wil- 
liams and Bishop Coxe were easily leaders in the next. Suspected, discredited, 
counted disloyal to the Church, denounced as Romans in disguise, these men were in 
the advance guard ; they were of the hope that seemed at times forlorn. They were 
pioneers, who found and cleared the way ; and we, who come after them along a 
smooth and open path, forget the risk and pain and labor with which they won our 
liberties 

" The priest who wrote ' Dreamland,' the priest who was filled with the beauty of 
holiness of the worship and reverence due to God's house (into whose sanctuary I 
believe he never entered, when he could avoid it, without taking the shoes of outdoor 
use from off his feet); the priest who helped to restore the disused matins and even- 
song, who was among the first to recognize the Holy Eucharist as the chief act of 
worship, to be used at least on every Lord's Day, who as bishop said in his last charge 
to his clergy : ' The New Testament tells us clearly to hallow the Lord's Day by the 
Lord's Supper. This is our law and our rubric, and to this reformation I call you all 
in God's name'; the priest who was by nature strict in the observance of all the 
niceties and proprieties and dignities of divine service, and all this not recently, but 
fifty years ago, was a man whom we ought to honor for his prophetic power of insight 
and utterance, for the courage of his maintained positions in the far advance of the 
first rank to which the host has since come up 

"He not only rejoiced, but took no little part in the first enlargement of our 
hymnology, from which, with most positive determination, he absolutely excluded 
every hymn of his own. I am quite clear that the last committee has been wiser than 



212 History of St. Paul's Church. 

he in this behalf, in that we have given to the Church for use in its treasures of sacred 
song many hymns of his composing. One of them, at least, ' Saviour, Sprinkle 
Many Nations," is among the first of our Christian lyrics and among the most stirring 
of our missionary hymns. One turns over page after page of his collection of Chris- 
tian ballads, struck by the true, prophetic insight of his inspiration, as well as by the 
sonorous metre and rhythm of his verse. He certainly was enriched in all utterance, 
both of the eloquence which means outspeaking and the brilliant powers of an orator, 

and enriched in the utterance of true poetic gifts 

" What he himself described in his dedication to Dr. Hobart of the ' Christian 
Ballads ' as ' The glistening dews of a Christian boyhood ' never dried upon his brow . 
The freshness of his spirit was perennial. Within an hour of his death he was so 
absorbed in what his companion called ' an illuminating conversation ' on the resurrec- 
tion of the dead that he lost all sense of time and trains and of the needed nourish- 
ment of food. And to the very end, what he called the " glow of his early vow ' 
rested upon him like a halo in all its warmth and brightness." . 



September ii, 1896, at a meeting of the vestry, Messrs. W. H. 
Walker, A. Porter Thompson and E. H. Hutchinson were elected del- 
egates from St. Paul's " to the Special Council to meet in this city on 
the 6th day of October next, for the election of a bishop to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of Bishop Coxe." Messrs. James Swee- 
ney and Hobart Weed were also " elected special delegates to fill any 
vacancy that might be caused by inability of any of the delegates to 
attend the council." 

At the Special Council of the Diocese of Western New York, 
summoned by the Standing Committee for the election of a bishop, to 
fill the vacancy caused by the lamented death of the beloved Chief 
Pastor, Arthur Cleveland Coxe, D. D., LL. D., convened in Trinity 
Church, in the City of Buffalo, on Tuesday and Wednesday, the 6th 
and 7th days of October, 1896, the Right Reverend William D. 
Walker, D. D., LL. D., Missionary Bishop of North Dakota, was chosen 
to be the Diocesan. 

Bishop Walker had been for many years a missionary bishop in 
the West, where he carried on a successful, energetic work. He was 
born in New York City, June 29, 1839. In 1859, he was graduated 




THE RIGHT RP:VRRKND WILLIAM DAVID WALKER. D. D., LL. D.. D. C. L. 

Third Bishop of Western New York, i8g6. Consecrated Missionary Bishop of North 

Dakota, 1883 ; became Bishop of Western New York, 1896. 



Photograph, cop\rielit by iil\' 



ithers, 1^07. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 213 

from Columbia College, and in 1862 from the General Theological 
Seminary. In June, 1862, he was admitted to deacon's orders in the 
Church of the Transfiguration, New York, by Bishop Horatio Potter, 
who, the next year, in Calvary Church, New York, admitted him to 
the priesthood. He was a priest at Calvary Church until 1883, when 
the House of Bishops nominated him for the Missionary Episcopate of 
North Dakota. December 20, 1883, he was consecrated bishop in 
Calvary Church. " For many years Bishop Walker has served as one 
of the government commissioners to whom is entrusted the charge of 
the Indians. His cathedral car, which was the first of the kind, has 
attracted much attention. The car is fitted up like a chapel, and by 
means of this car Bishop Walker has been able to preach in hundreds 
of small places which would otherwise have been inaccessible." .... 
In 1884 Bish&p Walker received his degree of doctor of divinity from 
Racine, and in 1894 from the University of Oxford, England. In 1886 
the degree of LL. D. was given him by Griswold College and in 
1894 Trinity College, Dublin, conferred upon him a similar degree. 
He has also received the degree of D. C. L. from the University of 
King's College, Windsor, Nova Scotia. 

November 30, 1896, the meeting for the annual election of church- 
wardens and vestrymen for the parish was held in St. Paul's Church, 
being Monday in the week beginning with the First Sunday in 
Advent, due notice of such meeting having been given as provided 
by law. The rector, the Rev. Dr. J. A. Regester, presided. The fol- 
lowing persons were elected: William H. Walker, churchwarden for 
one year, A. Porter Thompson, churchwarden for two years ; Ed- 
mund Hayes, James Sweeney and Hobart Weed, vestrymen for three 
years ; Albert J. Barnard, Dr. M. D. Mann and Charles R. Wilson, 
vestrymen for two years ; James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele and John , 
Pease, vestrymen for one year. (First election under the new rule.) 

December ir, 1896, at a meeting of the vestry, Charles R. Wilson 
was elected clerk of the vestry and William A. Joyce treasurer of the 
parish, for the ensuing year. 



214 History of St. Paul's Church. 

The thanks of the vestry were extended to Philip Joyce for the val- 
uable aid and assistance rendered by him to the treasurer of the 
parish in the preparation of his annual report. 

The rector called attention to the formal action of the vestry, taken 
March 27, 1866, inviting the late Bishop Coxe to make St. Paul's 
church the cathedral of the diocese, and the bishop's acceptance of 
the invitation ; and that a committee had been appointed on April 25, 
1866, to formulate the proposed plan of making St. Paul's Church 
at the same time a parish church and the cathedral church of the dio- 
cese. This committee never having reported, it was thought that 
Bishop Walker might wish some further action in the matter. A 
committee was, therefore, appointed at this meeting of December 11, 
1896, consisting of the rector and the two wardens, to confer with 
Bishop Walker on the subject, if he should so desire. 

On Sunday, December 20, 1896, Bishop Walker preached his first 
sermon as Bishop of Western New York, in St. Paul's Church, Buffalo. 
Just before the sermon, the Rev. Dr. Regester, the rector, announced the 
Enthronization of Bishop Walker, to take place in St. Paul's Church on 
Wednesday morning ; then, turning to the people. Dr. Regester said : 
" The congregation will rise and join with me in a welcome to our 
bishop." The great congregation arose. Bishop Walker also arose, 
and Dr. Regester, in a few well-chosen words, welcomed him to the 
Cathedral church. 

On Wednesday morning, December 23, 1896, a large congregation 
filled St. Paul's to take part in the ceremony of the Enthronization of 
Bishop Walker as Bishop of Western New York. Almost every clergy- 
man of the diocese was present at the impressive service, which is of 
English origin, and was the first of the kind ever held in Buffalo. 

The procession entered the church in the following order : The 
vested choirs of St. Paul's and Ascension churches, singing the hymn, 
"The Church's One Foundation"; they were followed by the Lay 
Officers of the Diocese and the Lay Members of the Standing Com- 
mittee ; the Master of Ceremonies, the Clergy of the Diocese, the 



History of St. Paul's Church. 215 

Arch- Deacons, the Registrar, the Secretaries, Clerical Members of the 
Standing Committee, the Bishop's Chaplains, one of whom carried the 
pastoral staff, and lastly the Bishop. 

On reaching the chancel, the Testimonial of Election and con- 
formity to the Canonical requirements, prepared by the chancellor, the 
Hon. James M. Smith, was read by the Hon. John E. Pound of Lock- 
port. Judge Smith was prevented by illness from being present. 
Then the bishop, kneeling, with a chaplain on either side, commended 
himself to God in prayer. The officiant, the Rev. Dr. Walter North, 
then led the congregation in a special prayer for the bishop, after 
which the officiant conducted the new diocesan to the Episcopal Chair, 
and said : 

" In the Name of God, Amen : I, Walter North, do, by the authority committed 
to me for that purpose, install and enthrone you, Rt. Rev. Father, into the Episcopal 
Chair of this diocese. The Lord preserve thy coming in and thy going out from this 
time forth, f orevermore. " 

The Te Deum was then sung, followed by special versicles and a 
prayer for the bishop. The address of welcome was then delivered 
by the Rev. Dr. Henry Anstice of Rochester, during which the bishop 
stood in the front of the chancel with a chaplain on either side. 

Dr. Anstice said, in part : 

"Rt. Rev. Father in God : On this auspicious occasion, in behalf of the clergy 
and laity of Western New York, I am commissioned to express to you, in your now 
officially and fully recognized position as our Diocesan, our most cordial, deep-felt 
welcome. 

" You do not come among us as a stranger. Some of us have long known and 
esteemed you in your earlier spheres of work. But in the recent years, you have 
especially endeared yourself to us by the kindly, sympathetic and unselfish readiness 
with which you helped our bishop when he turned to you for aid. . . . 

' ' We realize the great importance of the field presented in this portion of the 
Empire State — the largeness of the place filled by the wise and venerated De Lancey, 
the scholarly and courtly Coxe. We recognize the difficulties which attend some 
problems now pressing to be met and solved. 

" So thus we bid you welcome, here and now, an earnest, cordial, loyal, enthusias- 
tic welcome to our churches, to our homes and to our hearts." .... 



2i6 History of St. Paul's Church. 

At the close of the address, Bishop Walker entered the pulpit and 
made an eloquent and earnest response, in the course of which he 
said : 

" When a bishop of a diocese is chosen from among the ranks of the priesthood, 
his induction to office begins at the time when the hands of the consecrating bishop 
are laid upon his head ; bat when a missionary bishop is called to be diocesan of a 
specific charge, the time of his induction begins when he formally accepts the sacred 
duties. 

' ' But it seemed only fitting that such a great, such an awful responsibility as that 
of being put in charge of this diocese should be emphasized with some public ceremo- 
nial, hence this beautiful service of enthronization to-day." .... 

Bishop Walker spoke most feelingly of his predecessor in office, 
the revered Bishop Coxe, and of his great and successful work for the 
Church and the diocese : 

' ' How can I speak of the duties of this sacred office without referring to the work 
of him who for almost a third of a century worked among you as bishop, scholar, 
poet, saint ? " . . . . 

In closing, Bishop Walker said : 

"Humbly would I serve Him, our King. Humbly would I plead with you to 
work for His kingdom in this great, important diocese of this great land." .... 

After the conclusion of the address, the bishop was celebrant at the 
Holy Communion, and the services closed with the recessional hymn : 

" Glorious things of thee are spoken, 
Zion, City of our God." 

Through the generosity of certain parishioners, the rector was 
enabled to have the services of a parish visitor, Mrs. Carrie Jones. 
Investigation of need, prompt giving of relief, visitation of strangers, 
the care of women and young girls, the bringing of children to Holy 
Baptism and to Sunday School, have all been made easier and the 
rector relieved and aided. 

Of especial interest in the history of this year is the building of 
the new Parish House. The lot on Pearl Street, opposite the church. 



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History of St. Paul's Church. 217 

was purchased by the vestry in the year 1844, and a brick rectory 
was finished there in 1847, in which Dr. and Mrs. Shelton lived for the 
remainder of their lives. Here the most of the social life of the parish 
centered, the many reunions and informal evening receptions given 
by Dr. and Mrs. Shelton serving to make the people like a large fam- 
ily. Everyone was welcome and made to feel at home. 

After Dr. Shelton's death, the old rectory was used as a Guild 
House, and later, following the fire of 1888, it was called the Parish 
House, and was used for the meetings of the different societies, and for 
the general secular work of St. Paul's. It was found more and more 
inadequate as the parish grew and the work increased. 

Nearly all took part in the accomplishment of the plan for a new 
Parish House, but especial acknowledgment must be given to the 
faithful work of the women of the church, who, led by Mrs. Sheldon 
T. Viele, suggested and carried the project through to success. The 
plans were made by Messrs. Green & Wicks, the needs of the several 
departments of work, together with the narrowness of the lot, twenty- 
seven and three-quarters feet front by one hundred and sixteen feet 
deep, necessitating much careful planning, and the result has been 
satisfactory. The front of the four-story building is of brick with 
trimmings of the same brown stone as that used in the church, and 
is Gothic in style. It is 105 feet in depth and covers the entire lot, 
with the exception of a small area in the rear. Over $20,000 was 
raised by the parish for this work. The list of subscribers to the 
Parish House Building Fund will be found at page 434. The cost of 
the building, which is of modern, fire-proof construction throughout, 
was about $27,000. 

1897. 

January 10, 1897, died Edward C. Walker, who had nearly all of 
his life been closely identified with St. Paul's. He was long a mem- 
ber of the music committee, and, with Hobart Weed, had charge of 



2i8 History of St. Paul's Church. 

the musical affairs of the church, and to those affairs he gave freely 
and unselfishly of his time, his enthusiasm, and his cultured knowledge 
of music. He had a fine and sympathetic voice, and his beautiful 
singing in the old choir will be long remembered. Mr. Walker was a 
man of sterling character, a kinsman and business partner of William 
H. Walker, the senior warden of the parish. 

January i8, 1897, at a service held by the Brotherhood of St. 
Andrew in " The Chapel " at St. Paul's, an address was made by 
George Alfred Stringer on " Incidents Illustrating the Personality, 
Mind and Religion of the late Bishop Coxe." This interesting paper 
was published in full in the "Sunday Express" of January 24, 
1897. 

The new Parish House was formally opened for use February 25, 
1897, an occasion of especial interest to the whole parish, and there 
was a large attendance. The building committee, composed of 
Messrs. Edmund Hayes, H. C. Harrower, Charles R. Wilson, W. H. 
Walker and the rector, " presented a financial report which showed 
how nobly the parish had put out its strength to obtain the house, 
while the address of the senior warden, William H. Walker, very 
fittingly expressed the benevolent spirit of that effort and told of the 
good work for others of which it was intended that the Parish House 
should be the center." 

Mrs. Carrie Jones, the devoted parish visitor, was obliged to give 
up her work on account of failing health. The rector then secured the 
services of Sister Magdalene, of the Sisters of Bethany, New Orleans. 

In March, 1897, was held the first of the noonday Lenten services, 
which were very largely attended, especially by business men. These 
services, lasting twenty minutes, consisted of prayers, hymns, and a 
short address, and were conducted daily throughout Lent by clergymen 
from the different churches of the city. While an innovation in Buffalo, 
they have proved very successful in the down-town churches of other 
cities. These services at St. Paul's are largely attended and appreci- 
ated, the congregations not by any means being limited to churchmen. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 219 

March 29, 1897, at West Chester, Pa., died Miss Mary W. Hills. 
Miss Hills and her sisters were members of St. Paul's Church, and, as 
the proprietors and teachers of the only Church school for girls in 
Buffalo, in former days, they are held in loving remembrance by a 
large number of the churchwomen of St. Paul's Parish. The follow- 
ing is from "The Churchman" of April 10, 1897 : 

" The passing to Paradise of Mary Wilcox Hills closes the earthly record of the last 
of the three sisters whose life work brought benediction to the City of Buffalo. The 
Misses Hills School for Girls was established in that city in 1847, by the daughters of 
Horace Hills of Auburn, N. Y., and until 1884, a period of thirty-seven years, it alone 
filled a place since held by St. Margaret's School. Emily, who had been married to 
Ebenezer Hale, of Canadaigua, in 1862, entered into rest in 1873, and Clarissa was called 
hence at Christmas-tide, 1883. In the following spring the school was closed, and Mary 
Wilcox Hills, advanced in years, and always of delicate physical health, laid down 
her work to make her home with her brother, the late Rev. George Morgan 
Hills, D. D 

"Of rare intellectual ability and culture, a churchwoman by conviction and a 
saint in daily living, Mary Wilcox Hills now waits for the consummation of the 
Resurrection Day, leaving here the lasting blessing of a life of goodly and godly 
labors." 

April 29, 1897, the vestry resolved to place a mortgage of $15,000 
on the Parish House property, for the purpose of paying off the exist- 
'ing mortgage of $8,000 on the premises, and advancing the further 
sum of $7,000 for the completion of the new building. This mort- 
gage was given to the Erie County Savings Bank, with interest at 4j^ 
per centum per annum. 

At the same meeting, Messrs. Walker, Hopkins, Hutchinson, 
Thompson and Sweeney were elected delegates to the Annual Diocesan 
Council to be held at Rochester, N. Y., in May, 1897. 

August 16, 1897, the Board of Aldermen of the City of Buffalo 
adopted the following resolution : 

" That the junction of Main, Erie, Church and Niagara streets be known as Shel- 
ton Square (In kindly remembrance of an eminent Buffalonian, as a requisite 
designation of a very prominent point in the city.)" 



220 History of St. Paul's Church. 

This was concurred in by the Board of Councilmen on August 
1 8th and approved by Mayor Edgar B. Jewett. 

The city authorities honored themselves in taking this graceful and 
appropriate action. Shelton Square was formed in the following way : 
Shortly after the completion, in 1893, of the new building of the Erie 
County Savings Bank, on the site of the old First Presbyterian Church, 
the land lying between that lot and Main Street, and between St. Paul's 
lot and Main Street, was asphalted by the city authorities, and was 
formed, in connection with the head of Church Street, into a short street 
or "square," immediately west of and parallel with Main Street. The 
junction of Church Street and Main Street was closed with stone posts, 
and the traffic diverted to the north and south through this new street. 
(See page 261, and photograph opposite page 440.) 

Shelton Square is also of interest because it marks the location 
where, in early days, Main Street was curved to fit the semi-circular pro- 
jection at the middle of the front of Joseph EUicott's loo-acre domain, 
sometimes referred to as " EUicott's Bow- window.'' (Pages 16, 174 ) 

Church Street was then Stadnitski Avenue ; Main Street, south of 
Church Street, was called Willink Avenue, and, north of it. Van Stap- 
horst Avenue. The original easterly line of St. Paul's lot was directly 
on the outer curve of Willink Avenue, and is so described in the deed 
dated June 14, 1820, recorded in Erie County Clerk's office, in Liber 6' 
of Deeds, at page 255 (formerly at page 247). (See pages 16 and 19, 
this volume.) The lot of the First Presbyterian Church, on the opposite 
side of Church Street, was exactly like St. Paul's lot in description, except 
that it was reversed from north to south. It fronted, according to the 
deed, dated December 12, 1820, on the curve of Van Staphorst Avenue. 
(This deed is recorded in Liber'6 of Deeds, at page 413, formerly page 390.) 

Pearl Street was divided by Church Street into North and South 
Cayuga streets at this time. Niagara Street was Schimmelpenninck 
Avenue. 

The point of division of Main Street into Van Staphorst Avenue 
on the north, and Willink Avenue on the south, is sometimes stated to 



History of St. Pauls Church. 221 

have been Erie Street, then called Vollenhoven Avenue, and this error 
appears in the official " Index of Streets and Public Grounds," printed 
by the Bureau of Engineering of the City of Buffalo, 1896. The old 
church deeds above referred to, as well as the map of the survey by 
the Commissioners of Highways, August 18, 182 1, in the village 
records, show that Church Street (Stadnitski Avenue) was the point of 
division. The attention of the Engineer's office has been called to the 
error in the " Index," and it has been corrected on the official copy. 

In 1809, the Highway Commissioners decided to straighten Main 
Street, and " Ellicott's Bow-window " was done away with, by running 
the east line of Main Street through it. August 18, 1821, the Com- 
missioners fixed the width of Main Street at ninety-nine feet — as at 
present. The semi-circular curve of the westerly line of the street 
(in front of " the churches "), however, is still shown in Ball's map of 
Buffalo in 1825, but was soon after obliterated. 

By vote of the Board of Trustees of the Village of Buffalo, on 
July 13, 1826, the old Dutch names of the streets were dropped, and 
the present names adopted ; and at this time, also. North and South 
Cayuga streets became Pearl Street. 

(See the map of Buffalo Village in this volume, also reproduction 
of Ball's map of Buffalo, in " Publications of Buffalo Historical 
Society," volume I.) 

October 28, 1897, the vestry passed resolutions of thanks to Mrs. 
Geo. E. Hayes, for her gift of $1,000 to the Endowment Fund, to be 
known as the " George E. Hayes Memorial Gift." 

In October, 1897, the International Convention of the Brotherhood 
of St. Andrew was held in Buffalo. A very impressive early morning 
celebration of the Holy Communion was held in St. Paul's Church, at 
which 1,400 men communicated, the Lord Bishop of Rochester, Eng- 
land, being the celebrant, with eight assistants. 

October 19, 1897, Mrs. Jane Wey Grosvenor, widow of Seth H. 
Grosvenor, died, aged 79 years. Mrs. Grosvenor and her family have 
been long and prominently associated with St. Paul's Parish. She was 



222 History of St. Paul's Church. 

a niece of the late Mrs. Shelton, with whom she came to live in Buffalo 
when she was nine years of age. For many years of her married life 
she lived with Dr. and Mrs. Shelton in the old rectory, on which site 
the new Parish House of St. Paul's stands. 

Mr. Grosvenor died in 1864. 

" The beauty and lovableness of her character were extraordinary. 
Her death removes one of Buffalo's best-known and best-beloved 

women Possessing high intelligence, a great reader, of rare 

cultivation of mind and character, she was a power in this community 
for the many years of her useful, honored life." .... 

Mrs. Grosvenor's death was followed only a few months after, on 
January 10, 1898, by that of her eldest daughter, Mrs. Jane Glenny, the 
wife of William H. Glenny. Mrs. Glenny was born in the old rectory, 
and was, all of her life, intimately associated with the life and chari- 
table work of St. Paul's Parish. 

October 28, 1897, at a meeting of the vestry, William H. Walker 
offered the following memorial on the death of Mrs. Seth H. Grosvenor, 
which was adopted and ordered entered on the minutes : 

"Whereas, The vestry has received the intelligence of the death of Mrs. Seth 
H. Grosvenor, we wish to place on our records our sense of the great loss that has 
come to St. Paul's Parish, as well as to the community at large. Nearly the whole of 
Mrs. Grosvenor's life was passed in the closest connection with this parish. For 
many years she was an honored and beloved member of the family at the rectory, and 
she, as well as her children, held a very high place in the affection and regard of Wil- 
liam Shelton, D. D., then the eminent rector of St. Paul's. When the family left the 
rectory for their new home her interest in the parish continued, and during all her life 
she was one of its most loyal and liberal supporters. She possessed a rare combina- 
tion of noble qualities, which will always be remembered by those who knew her. St. 
Paul's Parish has many precious and inspiring memories connected with its past his- 
tory, but none of these will be more precious, or more inspiring, than those associated 
with the name of Mrs. Seth H. Grosvenor." 

November 29, 1897, in St. Paul's Church, being Monday in the 
week beginning with the First Sunday in Advent, was held the annual 
meeting of the parish, for the election of a churchwarden and three 



History of St. Paul's Church. 223 

vestrymen. The rector presided, and the following persons were 
elected : William H. Walker, churchwarden for two years ; James 
R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele and John Pease, vestrymen for three 
years. The other members of the vestry, holding over from previous 
election, were : A. Porter Thompson, churchwarden ; and Albert J. 
Barnard, Edmund Hayes, James Sweeney, Hobart Weed, Charles R. 
Wilson and Dr. Matthew D. Mann, vestrymen. 

December 20, 1897, Charles R. Wilson was elected clerk of the 
vestry and Wm. A. Joyce was elected treasurer of the parish, for the 
ensuing year. 

At this meeting the vestry passed a resolution of thanks to Miss 
Susan Kimberly for her gift of $1,000 to the Endowment Fund, in 
memory of her sister, the late Miss Charlotte Kimberly. 

The "Year Book" for 1897 opens with an answer from the rector 
to certain questions about the work of the parish. " It has been asked 
a number of times why St. Paul's Church does not have a ' settlement ' 
for work among the less privileged of the community. The reply 
has always been that it has one, and has had it for a number of years, 
.... all those various forms of benevolent effort which have a 
place in ' settlement ' work have been in the past, and are now, ener- 
getically and efificiently worked from our Parish House. The pecu- 
liarity and the advantage of such work in our parish is that St. Paul's 
Church, the center of worship and of its spiritual life, stands in close 
connection with our Parish House, the center of our benevolent work, 
and not separated from it. The parish is, in other words, doing its 
benevolent — its ' settlement ' — work, not at arm's length, but near to 
its own heart, and with close and proper association between its benev- 
olent activity and the spiritual forces which inspire it and give it 
strength, and which alone can crown it with its best results." 

The rector has for many years past urged the necessity of an en- 
dowment fund for the church. St. Paul's Church ought always, for 
many reasons, to stay where it is ; there is a splendid work for it to 
do, but for that work a full and sufficient endowment is a necessity. 



224 History of St. Paul's Church. 

and that necessity will be greater and greater as the years go on, and 
the city grows. It was one of the dearest wishes of the late Dr. Shel- 
ton that the church should have a constantly-growing endowment 
fund, which he hoped would one day be a goodly and sufficient amount 
to carry on successfully into the future the work of his beloved parish. 
The Shelton Society, in addition to much other work, notably their 
help towards furnishing the new Parish House, have also renovated 
the altar and chancel in the Sunday School room, and supplied Com- 
munion silver for the service for deaf mutes, which is now held there. 
" When the missionary in charge of the deaf mutes in Buffalo requested 
that he might make St. Paul's the center for his work, and might have 
the Sunday School room for his services, the rector had neither chalice 
nor paten for the Holy Communion, as all belonging to the parish were 
in use in the service in the church, which came at the same hour. Hear- 
ing of the need, the Shelton Society relieved it by the gift of a silver 
communion service for that special use." 



1898. 

April 2, 1898, the vestry passed a resolution of thanks to the Misses 
Abby W. Grosvenor and Lucretia S. Grosvenor, for their gift of $1,000 
to the Endowment Fund, in memory of their mother, Mrs. Jane Wey 
Grosvenor. 

May 16, 1898, the vestry appointed the following persons as dele- 
gates to the Annual Council to be held at Trinity Church, Buffalo, 
N. Y., May 23, 1898 : 

Delegates — William H. Walker, Henry R. Hopkins, E. H. Hutch- 
inson. 

Alternates — A. -Porter Thompson, James Sweeney. 

The Shelton Memorial Endowment Fund was this year augmented by 
the thoughtfulness of a former parishioner, the late Miss Elizabeth Bull, 
who arranged that at her death the church, where her family have wor- 



History of St. Paul's Church. 225 

shipped for so many years, should receive a bequest of $500, to be 
added to its endowment. On August 12, 1898, the vestry passed a 
vote of thanks to her family and executor for the payment of the 
legacy of $475, being the amount bequeathed, less the inheritance tax. 

Another addition to the Endowment, of $346.75, was made by the 
sale of the Shelton china, in January, 1898. This china was pre- 
sented to Dr. and Mrs. Shelton by the parishioners, at Christmas, 
1867, more than thirty years before, and was much prized by them. 
In Dr. Shelton's will the china was bequeathed to St. Paul's, and was 
carefully kept, being used occasionally at parish gatherings. Since the 
completion of the new Parish House, which is in reality now largely a 
mission house, the china has not been needed for use, and it was 
accordingly decided to place it on sale, the pieces to be sold sepa- 
rately. The people gladly availed themselves of the opportunity for 
buying one or more pieces, as mementoes of old St. Paul's, and in 
remembrance of Dr. Shelton. 

August 12, 1898, Mr. Walker, for the finance committee, reported 
to the vestry that since the last meeting of the vestry, Miss Elizabeth 
A. McKee, an old parishioner of St. Paul's Church, had died, and that 
by her death her house and lot. No. 98 Fifteenth Street, had come into 
the possession of St. Paul's Church. Miss McKee died July 23, 1898. 
She had purchased this property January 9, 1886, for $3,850. She 
later notified the vestry of her wish to give it to St. Paul's, and on 
May 23, 1889, she executed a deed to the corporation, reserving only 
the use of the property during her lifetime, and agreeing to pay all 
taxes and maintenance herself. 

Miss McKee will long be remembered by the older members of St. 
Paul's. She had lived with Mrs. Shelton before her marriage to Dr. 
Shelton, and afterwards made her home with them in the rectory until 
after Mrs. Shelton's death, her valued helper, housekeeper and com- 
panion for more than thirty years. Dr. Shelton bequeathed the sum 
of $7,000 to Miss McKee, and in his will spoke of her in terms of 
regard and respect. (See page 149.) 



226 History of St. Paul's Church. 

November i, 1898, the vestry resolved that the finance committee 
be and hereby is authorized to sell the house No. 98 Fifteenth Street 
on the best terms obtainable. 

November 28, 1898, being Monday in the week beginning with the 
First Sunday in Advent, was held the annual election of the parish, in 
St. Paul's Church, for the election of a churchwarden for two years 
and three vestrymen for three years. The rector presided, and the 
following persons were elected : A. Porter Thompson, warden for 
two years ; Albert J. Barnard, Charles R. Wilson and Matthew D. 
Mann, vestrymen for three years. 

The other members of the vestry for this year, holding over from 
previous elections, were : William H. Walker, churchwarden ; and 
John Pease, James R. Smith, Edmund Hayes, James Sweeney, 
Sheldon T. Viele and Hobart Weed, vestrymen. 

December 12, 1898, Charles R. Wilson was elected clerk of the 
vestry and Wm. A. Joyce was elected treasurer of the parish, for 
the ensuing year. 

In 1898, Miss Eva M. Smiley became the parish visitor. 

1899. 

May 8, 1899, the vestry elected the following persons as delegates 
to the Annual Council of the Diocese of Western New York to be 
held at Geneva, N. Y., May 16, 1899 : 

Delegates — Wm. H. Walker, James Sweeney, Henry R. Hopkins. 

Alternates — Charles R. Wilson, Mark H. Lewis and Marshall J. Root. 

In November, 1899, the Rev. John S. Littell, who had been Dr. 
Regester's valued curate for the past four years, left St. Paul's to 
become rector of St. Luke's Church, Brockport, N. Y. At the vestry 
meeting of November 13, 1899, a letter expressing the vestry's appre- 
ciation of his services was ordered sent to him. In Mr. Littell's letter 
of reply, and which was entered in full on the minutes of the vestry, is 
a characterization of the rector so true to life that it must be inserted 



History of St. Paul's Church. 227 

here. Mr. Littell says : " My four years and more in residence in the 
parish has shown me much that is strong and large and noble among 
your people ; but my chief treasure taken from your parish is a great 
inspiration from the life and work of your rector, in his manliness, gen- 
tleness and Christian spirit, in the clearness of his Christian thinking, 
and in his loyal doing of his duty as a priest for our Blessed Lord. 
Rarely have I met a man so thorough in work, so capacious in sympa- 
thies, and so elevating in his own spiritual life. I esteem it a great 
privilege to have been associated with him." . . . 

The rector stated, at the vestry meeting of November 13, 1899, 
that he had secured the services of the Rev. Coleman E. Byram as 
curate. Mr. Byram began his work at St. Paul's on November isth. 

On November 24, 1899, died Mrs. Sarah E Bryant, widow of 
George H. Bryant. Mrs. Bryant had long been a parishioner of 
St. Paul's, and was a sister of Mr. James Sweeney, of the vestry. 

November 27, 1899, died the Hon. James Murdock Smith, LL. D., 
Chancellor of the Diocese of Western New York, aged eighty-three 
years. Judge Smith was born in Vermont, August 23, 1816. In 1824 
his father removed, with his family, to Gouverneur, N. Y., and he was 
admitted to the bar, in 1837, as an attorney in the supreme court and so- 
licitor in chancery. In 1838, James M. Smith removed to Buffalo, then a 
very small city, where he practiced law for many years. In 1 862 the firm 
of Ganson & Smith was formed, which held a high position and was very 
widely known. In 1873, Hon. Isaac A. Verplanck, one of the judges 
of the superior court of Buffalo, died and Mr. Smith was appointed by 
the Governor and Senate to fill the vacancy, and in 1874 he was ap- 
pointed his own successor for the term of fourteen years. In 1873, 
Hobart College conferred on Judge Smith the honorary degree of 
LL. D. Judge Smith on first coming to Buffalo was a member of Trin- 
ity Church, but afterwards was prominently identified with St. Paul's 
to the time of his death. His funeral, which was held in St. Paul's on 
the 30th November, was very largely attended. His wife had died in 
1887, and he was survived by his daughter, Mrs. Robert P. Wilson, 



228 History of St. Paul's Church. 

and his son, Philip S. Smith. The following is from "Church 
Work" for January i, 1900 : "The diocese suffers a sore loss in the 
recent death of the Hon. James M. Smith, LL. D. He was the first 
chancellor of the diocese, receiving the appointment from Bishop 
Coxe in 1874 and holding it to the day of his death. His attendance 
at our Diocesan Council goes back to the time before the division of the 
diocese, and there were few sessions in this long period in which he 
was not an active participant. He also was a frequent deputy to the 
general conventions. Amidst the engrossing duties of his profession 
he always found time, or made time, to give attention to the calls of 
the Church and the requirements of worthy citizenship. To his legal 
skill we owe the excellent canon recently adopted for the election of 
wardens and vestrymen ; and the present constitution and canons of 
the diocese were formulated under his wise and discriminating judg- 
ment. He was blessed with prosperity, and no man could be a better 
almoner of God's blessings than was he. No worthy charity was ever 
refused his aid, and his beneficence to the Church was constant and 

continuing In the life of Chancellor Smith we have a true type 

of a loyal churchman." . . . 

December 4, 1899, being Monday in the week beginning with the 
First Sunday in Advent, the parish meeting for the election of a church- 
warden and three vestrymen was held in the church building, the Rev. 
Dr. Regester, the rector, presiding. William H. Walker was elected 
churchwarden for two years, and Edmund Hayes, Hobart Weed and 
James Sweeney were elected vestrymen for three years. 

The other members of the vestry for this year, holding over from 
previous elections, were : A. Porter Thompson, churchwarden ; and 
John Pease, Albert J. Barnard, James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele, 
Charles R. Wilson and Dr. M. D. Mann. 

December 18, 1899, died Mrs. Agnes L. Thompson Warren, widow 
of Edward S. Warren, at the family home, corner of Niagara Street 
and Porter Avenue, where she had lived for more than forty years. 
Mrs. Warren was born in the Village of Black Rock, now a part of the 



History of St. Paul's Church. 229 

City of Buffalo, in January, 1819, and was a daughter of Sheldon 
Thompson, one of the earliest settlers of Buffalo. More than half a 
century ago she married Edward Stevens Warren, who died in 1863. 
She was a life-long member of St. Paul's Church, of which her father 
was one of the founders and one of the first vestrymen ; her husband 
was also a member of the vestry in 1850. She was a sister of A. 
Porter Thompson, one of the present wardens of the parish, and of 
Mrs. Henry K. Viele, and is also survived by two sons, William Y. 
Warren and Edward S. Warren of Buffalo ; and two daughters, Mrs. 
Rodney, wife of Col. George B. Rodney, U. S. A., and Mrs. Has- 
brouck, wife of Gen. Henry C. Hasbrouck, U. S. A. The Thomp- 
son, Warren and Viele families have always been prominently 
identified with the life and work of St. Paul's. 

The " Year Book," dated Advent, 1899, gives a full and clear record 
of the extensive work of the parish. In the Prefatory Notes, the rec- 
tor says : " Hours of service, methods of work, figures, and names of 
workers, do not tell all or the best, by any means, of the life of the 
parish, but they tell a good deal. . . They show that the work of 
the parish is moving with steady step ; that the end in view is, in good 
measure, being reached ; and, best of all, that that end is an unselfish 
one. ' Not to be ministered unto, but to minister.' That, your rector 
believes, is plainly written on the work of the parish, as it is — as he 
knows — the spirit which animates the hearts of the workers. . . . 
The effort to reach the men gathered in the cheap lodging houses in 
the lower part of the city has been strengthened. Last winter service 
was held on Sunday night in one lodging house. This winter access 
has been gained to another. In this way some privilege of worship 
and an earnest, direct word of counsel and advice are brought to about 
a hundred men each Sunday night. It is not easy work, with all else that 
there is to fill the hours of Sunday, but the clergy and the lay readers, and 
other men helping them, feel that it is work well worth doing 

" Great and sad losses have come to the parish in the past year 
through the death of valued parishioners, whose love and helping 



230 History of St. PauVs Church. 

hand could always be relied upon in any good work. But the influence 
of their example has not died. They have left behind them, as a her- 
itage to their children, the spirit of earnest love and loyalty to St. 

Paul's Church Most grateful mention must be made of two 

generous bequests to the parish, of $3,000 by the Hon. James M. Smith, 
and of a like sum by Mrs. Agnes L. Warren. So large an increase of the 
Endowment Fund cannot but inspire confidence for the future." .... 
The rector also received privately from " a parishioner," $100 for 
the Endowment Fund. 



1900. 

January 2, 1900, at a meeting of the vestry held at the Parish 
House, Charles R. Wilson was elected clerk of the vestry for the 
ensuing year and Wm. A. Joyce was elected treasurer of the parish. 

May II, 1900, at a meeting of the vestry, the following delegates 
were chosen to the Annual Council of the Diocese of Western New 
York to be held at Lockport, N. Y., on May 15, 1900 : William H. 
Walker, James Sweeney and Henry R. Hopkins, M. D. 

The following letter, received from the executors of the last will and 
testament of Hon. James Murdock Smith, deceased, was then presented : 

" To THE Rector, Churchwardens and Vestrymen of St. Paul's Church, 
Buffalo. 
" Gentlemen, — We have pleasure in transmitting to you herewith the amount of the 
legacy bequeathed to St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, toward its Endowment Fund, by the 
terms of the last will and testament of the late James M. Smith, LL. D., Chancellor 
of the Diocese of Western New York, our honored and beloved father. 
" Very truly yours, 

"(Signed.) MARGARET L. WILSON, 
"PHILIP S. SMITH, 

" Executors." 
A vote of thanks was resolved by the vestry to the executors, and the 
minute was entered : . . . " We also wish to put on record our appreciation 
of this welcome gift to the object so dear to the members of the parish." 



History of St. Paul's Church. 231 

The matter of protecting the Endowment Fund of the parish by 
legislative enactment was then discussed, and, on motion, referred to 
a committee, consisting of Mr. Viele and Mr. Wilson. The vestry 
also resolved : " That a vote of thanks be extended to Mr. Philip S. 
Smith, for the efi&cient services rendered by him during the past year, 
as a member of the music committee." 

October 22, 1900, at a meeting of the vestry, the rector presented 
the application of the Rev. Coleman E. Byram for recommendation by 
the vestry to the bishop for ordination to the priesthood ; also the 
application of Frank Wayne Abbott, Jr., for recommendation for admis- 
sion as a candidate for the holy ministry. 

The rector reported the gift, from Edmund Hayes, of a set of 
offering-plates for the church, and a vote of thanks for the gift was 
tendered Mr. Hayes by the vestry. 

On November 10, 1900, at the rectory. New York City, died the 
Rev. John W. Brown, D. D., rector of St. Thomas's Church. 

Dr. Brown had been rector of St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, from May 
7, 1882, to June I, 1888, when he left to take charge of the important 
parish of St. Thomas's. He had been very successful in his work 
at St. Paul's and was much beloved here. A short account of his 
life up to the time of his coming to Buffalo will be found at page 135. 

Dr. Brown, who was in his sixty-fourth year at the time of his death, 
had been in somewhat feeble health for three or four months, but the 
news of his passing away came with great suddenness and shock to 
his many faithful friends. 

After the burial, a largely-attended meeting was held in New York 
to do honor to his memory, and from the tribute adopted at this meet- 
ing we quote the following : 

. . . . " The very large gathering assembled of bishops, clergymen, and faithful 
laity attested the appreciation of the life and ministry just closed, while it expressed 
the earnest desire to do honor to the good priest, the loyal citizen, the noble man. 
The Church had called him to exalted places and responsible positions in her work and 
councils. As a rector in Middletown, Del., Philadelphia, Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo 
and New York, a member of the General Convention at several sessions, in the Board 



232 History of St. Paul's Church. 

of Missions, or manager later on and associated with representative bodies in civic 
life, he was always active and honored. 

" His long ministry, served in such large centers of influence, has been a fruitful 
one, and the abundant success of his life and vocation came from the sterling quali- 
ties, the fine character, the exalted purposes of the man. We have known in Dr. 
Brown the type of a priest, in which firm convictions of faith created high ideals of 
duty, and resolute performance of it. For his views of the Church and her mission, 
his estimation of the privilege and responsibility of his high oifice, and his ardent 
devotion to the weal of his fellow-man, made his life potent in influence, far-reaching 
in its grasp." 

On Sunday afternoon, November 10, 1901, after Evensong, a por- 
trait bust of the late Dr. Brown in Carrara marble, executed by J. 
Massey Rhind, was unveiled in a niche on the epistle side of the chan- 
cel of St. Thomas's Church, where it had been placed by the parishion- 
ers as a memorial to their late rector. 

The body rests in a plot of ground at Woodlawn Cemetery, New 
York City, given by some of Dr. Brown's personal friends, who, in 
1902, erected above the grave a monument in the form of a Celtic 
cross, fifteen feet in height, of beautiful design. 

December 3, 1900, being Monday in the week beginning with the 
First Sunday in Advent, the annual parish meeting was held in the 
church building for the election of a churchwarden for two years, and 
for three vestrymen for three years each. In the absence of the 
rector, the senior warden, William H. Walker, presided. A. Porter 
Thompson was elected churchwarden for two years, and James R. 
Smith, Sheldon T. Viele and John R. H. Richmond were elected ves- 
trymen. The other members of the vestry for this year, holding over 
from previous elections were : William H. Walker, warden ; and 
Albert J. Barnard, Edmund Hayes, James Sweeney, Hobart Weed, 
Charles R. Wilson and Dr. M. D. Mann, vestrymen. 

December 27, 1900, at a meeting of the vestry, Charles R. Wilson 
was re-elected clerk and Wm. A. Joyce was re-elected treasurer of the 
parish for the ensuing year. 

It was resolved : " That the vestry cordially approve of the sugges- 
tion of the rector, that a united effort be made to obtain by subscrip- 



History of St. Paul's Church. 233 

tions the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000), in payments 
running through two years, for the purpose of paying off the mort- 
gage on the Parish House, and of liquidating the floating debt ; and 
that the rector and Messrs. Hobart Weed and Charles R. Wilson be a 
committee to take charge of the subscriptions ; no subscription to be 
binding unless the sum of $20,000 is subscribed." At this meeting of 
the vestry, the report of the rector, from the special committee to which 
was referred the matter of securing a larger co-operation in the work of 
the parish, was presented, and, on motion, accepted and adopted. 
This was the constitution of certain " parish committees " to act in 
co-operation with the vestry, in the belief that it " would tend to increase 
interest in the parish and its affairs." The committees are composed 
of the younger men of the parish, and " have in charge such details of 
the work, formerly done by the vestry, as could be wisely and safely 
delegated to others." Any vacancies which may occur are to be filled 
by appointment by the vestry. 

PARISH COMMITTEES. 
(Co-operating with the vestry.) 

On Condition and Repair of Parish House. — E. Corning Townsend, chairman; 
Marshall J. Root, Robert Palen, Philip S. Smith, Howard A. Baker. 

On Church Grounds and Church Repairs. — Charles R. Wilson, chairman ; H. C. 
narrower, W. Y. Warren, John M. Provoost, G. Hunter Bartlett. 

On Lights and Heating. — John K. Walker, chairman; Walter Devereux, Norman 
Rogers, W. B. Gallagher. 

On Church Bells. — Robert M. Codd, Jr., chairman; Albert Thompson, Gerald 
Richmond, James Sweeney, Jr., William Alex. Faxon. 

On Pews and Pew Rentals. — John R. H. Richmond, chairman; W. T. Atwater, 
Henry Adsit Bull, O. H. P. Champlin, W. H. Walker, Jr. 

On the Envelope System. — Maxwell S. Wheeler, chairman ; Shelton Weed, J. N. 
Frierson, George T. Ballachey, John H. Baker. 

On the Sunday Morning Offering (to take the place of vestrymen when absent). — 
W. Y. Warren, Walter Devereux, E. S. Warren, John K. Walker. 

In the "Year Book" for 1900 is the following : "Resignation of 
Mr. Pease. On the 23d of November last the rector received a letter 



234 History of St. Paul's Church. 

from John Pease, the senior member of the vestry, in which he 
stated that owing to the infirmities of advancing years he desired to be 
relieved of active service, and to resign his position as a vestryman. 
At the parish meeting on the Monday after Advent Sunday, announce- 
ment was made of Mr. Pease's resignation and John R. H. Rich- 
mond was elected in his place. The first meeting of the vestry 
thereafter was on December 27th, when the two wardens were chosen 
as a committee to prepare a suitable minute to be entered upon the 
records of the vestry and to send a copy of the same to Mr. Pease. 
The minute. . . . truly expresses the feeling of the whole parish. " . . . . 
After referring to the very long term during which Mr. Pease had 
been an active and influential member of the vestry, the minute con- 
cludes as follows : 

" Always prompt in his attendance at our meetings, always faithful in the discharge 
of his duties as a member of the vestry, we cannot part with him without expressing the 
high regard and esteem that is felt for him by each one of us, and assuring him that 
our best wishes for his health and happiness will always attend him. 

" Resolved, That this minute be entered upon the records of the vestry, and that a 
copy of the same be sent to Mr. Pease.'' 

Mr. Pease was first elected to the vestry in 1855. 

At the vestry meeting of December 27, 1900, the committee ap- 
pointed on May 11, 1900, for that purpose, reported the following draft 
of an Act for protecting the Endowment Fund. This draft was ap- 
proved by the vestry, and the committee was requested to take the 
necessary steps to obtain its enactment by the Legislature of the State 
of New York. The Act was passed by the Legislature in 1901, and reads 

as follows : 

AN ACT 

To authorize and direct St. Paul's Church, in Buffalo, to set apart certain funds, as a 
permanent endowment fund, and to restrict the use and investment thereof. 
The people of the State of New York represented in Senate and Assembly do enact 

as follows . 

Section i. The corporation known as St. Paul's Church, in Buffalo, is hereby 

empowered to take and hold real and personal property, given, devised or bequeathed 

to it absolutely or in trust, thereby establishing and maintaining an endowment fund. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 235 

and all property so given, devised, or bequeathed to it unless otherwise specified in 
such gift, devise, or bequest, together with the trust fund now held by it, shall con- 
stitute a fund to be known as the " Permanent Endowment Fund," the income of 
which only shall be subject to expenditure for parish and church uses and purposes. 
No part of said fund, either principal or income, shall be liable either at law or in 
equity to the claims of the future creditors of said corporation, or subject to any 
mortgage or lien heretofore or hereafter executed or created by it. 

Sec. 2. The control of said " Permanent Endowment Fund " shall be vested in the 
vestry of the said St. Paul's Church, and the laws of this State as the same now exist, 
or shall hereafter be enacted, relating to securities in which the deposits in savings 
banks may be invested, shall apply to and govern the said vestry in the investment of 
the said fund, except that where investments are made in bonds and mortgages on 
unencumbered real property, the amount loaned shall not exceed sixty-five percentum 
on a conservative valuation of such property. 

Sec. 3. Any officer of the said corporation, or any other person, who shall divert 
or apply any part or portion of the principal of said Permanent Endowment Fund, 
or consent to the diversion or application of any part or portion of said fund, to any 
other use or purpose than that provided for in the foregoing sections, or shall invest 
the said fund, or any portion thereof, otherwise than as hereinabove provided, shall 
be guilty of a misdemeanor. 

Sec. 4. This act shall take effect immediately. 

The bequest of Mrs. Agnes L. Warren of $3,000 to the Endowment 
Fund, could not, under the provision of her will, be paid over by her 
executors until some such protection of the fund as the above mentioned 
act provides for had been secured. The bequest can now be added to 
the fund. 

At the same meeting of the vestry, December 27th, the rector 
reported the receipt of f 1,000 the gift of Mrs. Catharine B. Hayes 
to the Endowment Fund, being an addition to the " George E. Hayes 
Memorial." The vestry passed a vote of thanks to Mrs. Hayes for 
her very kind gift. Including the above additions, the Endowment Fund 
now amounts to $16,131.99. The rector also reported that Mrs. Thomas 
King Mann had placed a silver water pitcher in the robing room for the 
use of the clergy. The clerk was requested to acknowledge this gift. 

The "Year Book" for 1900 has the following "Notes": "The 
rector wishes to announce to the parish that he has entered into 



236 History of St. Paul's Church. 

co-operation with the Charity Organization Society in its ' Church 
District Plan,' and has taken under his care what is known as 
' District 50.' This district is a large one, bounded by Court and 
Clinton streets on the north, Michigan on the east, Scott on the south, 
and the Terrace on the west. It is the section of the city which would 
naturally fall to the care of our parish, and to which much care and 
work have always been given. ... In addition to the gifts already 
mentioned in connection with the Endowment Fund, grateful acknowl- 
edgment must be made for several other acts of generosity toward 
the parish during the past year. Through the interest and effort of 
several of the younger men of the parish, [especially C. R. Wilson 
and J. M. Provoost,] and the liberal support of their plan by others, 
a subscription of $420 was raised to place a concrete sidewalk, 
twenty- six feet wide, on the Church Street side of the church. The 
amount given was sufficient not only to make this fine improve- 
ment, but also to provide a board covering, with^and-rail, for the 
stone steps of the entrances on Pearl and Erie streets. From General 
Hayes has come the gift of the beautiful plates for the offering ; 
from Mrs. Robert P. Wilson and Charles R. Wilson, prayer books 
and hymnals for the chancel, to complete the Memorial of Robert 
P. Wilson ; from Mrs. Thomas King Mann, a silver pitcher for the 
rector's robing-room ; and from Philip S. Smith and Charles R. 
Wilson, liberal expenditures to strengthen and enrich the music ; 
and from Mrs. William Y. Warren, additional book cases for the study in 
the rectory and a generous gift to help the benevolent work in our new 
' Church District.' " . . . . 

1 901. 

January 9, 1901, the rector and vestry met the members of the 
recently-formed " Parish Committees," at the residence of Charles R. 
Wilson, to make arrangements for the work to be done by these com- 
mittees, according to the plan explained and outlined, at this meeting, 
by the rector. (For committees, see page 233.) 



History of St. Paul's Church. 237 

February 2, 1901, on the afternoon of the day of burial of Queen 
Victoria, a very impressive memorial service was held at St. Paul's. 
Bishop Walker's address was considered one of the ablest and most 
eloquent tributes paid to the dead Queen by any Buffalonian. It was 
estimated that over 2,000 persons were present, and the church was 
crowded to the doors. Seats were reserved for the societies of Sons 
of St. George, St. Andrew's Scottish Society, and the Victoria Club, 
who were present in a body. The church was elaborately draped in 
black and purple, and with the American and British flags. A special 
form of memorial service, authorized by the bishop, was used, and 
the music was finely rendered by the vested choir, assisted by Scinta's 
band. 

The noon-day Lenten services, now held every year at St. Paul's, 
are very largely attended and appreciated. The " Buffalo Commer- 
cial " of February 19 and 27, 1901, says, editorially: "The Rev. Dr. 
Regester, the universally loved rector of St. Paul's Cathedral, declared 
through the ' Commercial ' last evening that the short and edifying 
Lenten noon-day meetings were for all who profess and call themselves 

Christians. His invitation is in the spirit of broad liberality 

The attendance at the St. Paul's noon-day meetings must be very 
gratifying to Dr. Regester. Yesterday some of Buffalo's busiest men 

were present The invitation was a broadly Catholic one, and 

it has been accepted in that spirit." .... 

March 21, 1901, died Mrs. Laetitia Porter Viele, widow of Henry 
K. Viele. Mrs. Viele was born in the Village of Black Rock, now a 
part of the City of Buffalo, on March 16, 1821, and had been a resi- 
dent of the city for over eighty years. She was a daughter of Sheldon 
Thompson, one of the earliest settlers of Buffalo, and one of the 
founders of St. Paul's and a member of its first vestry, and Mrs. Viele 
was a life-long member and communicant of St. Paul's, and active in 
all the charities and good works of the parish. She was married to 
Henry K. Viele in 1843. ^^s. Viele was a sister of A. Porter Thomp- 
son, one of the present churchwardens, and her son, Sheldon Thomp- 



238 History of St. Paul's Church. 

son Viele, has been for several years a member of St. Paul's vestry. 
Her sister, Mrs. Agnes L. Warren, died only a few months before 
her, in December, 1899. 

April 30, 1901, the Hon. John E. Pound of Lockport, N. Y., was 
appointed Chancellor of the Diocese of Western New York, by Bishop 
Walker, to succeed the late Judge James M. Smith in that office. 

May 10, 1901, at a meeting of the vestry, William H. Walker, A. 
Porter Thompson and Dr. H. R. Hopkins were appointed delegates 
to the Diocesan Council to be held in Buffalo, May 27, 1901. 

June 10, 1 901, at a meeting of the vestry, it was resolved to refuse 
consent to the proposed connection of the Pearl Street line of the 
International Traction Company with its line in Erie Street, and of the 
latter line with its line in Niagara Street. 

It was the unanimous sense of the meeting that the proposed con- 
nection — resulting in the massing of cars and the attendant great 
increase of noise and confusion in their operation — would be very 
destructive to the use of the church for divine worship, and would be 
a perpetual nuisance. The following committee was appointed to take 
charge of the matter : Edmund Hayes, chairman ; Hobart Weed and 
Charles R. Wilson. 

June 18, 1901, The Bishop Coxe Memorial Hall at Geneva, N. Y., 
was dedicated with appropriate ceremonies. All churchmen in Western 
New York are interested in this beautiful memorial to the late Bishop of 
the Diocese, who was so universally revered and beloved, and St. Paul's, 
Buffalo, has shown its interest by contributing largely to the building 
fund — the amount subscribed by members of this parish being nearly 
eleven thousand dollars, over one-third of the cost of the memorial. 

"The Churchman" says: "The building, of brick with terra- 
cotta trimmings, is the gift of friends of the late Bishop Coxe within 
and without the diocese, and was presented to the trustees of Hobart 

College for the purposes of that corporation It is in the 

Elizabethan style of architecture. Over the entrance is the inscrip- 
tion : ' A Memorial to Arthur Cleveland Coxe.' "... 



History of St. Paul's Church. 239 

The building contains a large assembly hall with platform and gal- 
lery, an attractive room for the Hobart College Club, offices for the 
president and other officers, and class-rooms for recitations, and is on 
the west line of the college campus. 



In the afternoon of September 6, 1901, William McKinley, Presi- 
dent of the United States, while holding a public reception in the 
Temple of Music, at the Pan-American ExpositiiOn at Buffalo, was 
twice shot by an anarchist assassin, who had approached him with the 
apparent intention of grasping his hand in greeting. The stricken 
President was removed to the Exposition hospital, and skilled surgeons 
hastily summoned, who decided on an immediate operation, following 
which the President was removed to the house of John G. Milburn, 
president of the Exposition, which had been set aside for his use dur- 
ing his visit to Buffalo. After an anxious week of apparent improve- 
ment and sudden decline, the President died there in the early morning 
of Saturday, September 14th. 

On Sunday, the 15th, a brief funeral service was held at the 
house, after which the body was taken in procession through streets 
hung with mourning and thronged with sorrowing people to the City 
Hall, where it lay in state until nearly midnight, 100,000 persons pass- 
ing through the rotunda to look their last upon the noble and beautiful 
face of the dead President. The body was, on Monday, the i6th, taken 
to Washington, and from there to Canton, Ohio, the President's home, 
where the burial was held on the afternoon of Thursday, September 
19th. In the afternoon of the 19th, memorial services were held in 
almost every civilized country of the world. In all parts of the 
United States, in accordance with President Roosevelt's proclamation, 
the day was observed as one of mourning, unprecedented in the his- 
tory of the country. Special daily services of prayer for the President 
had been held at St. Paul's during the trying days preceding his death. 
The memorial service at St. Paul's, in the afternoon of September 



240 History of St. Paul's Church. 

19th, was a very solemn one, and was attended by a great throng of 
people, many standing throughout, and many more being unable to 
obtain admission to the church. The muffled tolling of the bells ceased, 
and the Service for the Burial of the Dead was said, preceded by 
Chopin's Funeral March, and the singing of the hymn, " Nearer, my 
God, to Thee." The church was heavily draped in black and white, 
and the American colors. The services were conducted by the rector, 
the Rev. Dr. Regester, and the music, consisting of anthems and 
hymns — among them "Lead, Kindly Light," which had always been 
a favorite with the President — was sung by the vested choir, assisted 
by the 74th Regiment Band. The service closed with the singing of 
"America," followed by Hartmann's Funeral March. The musical 
part of the service was under the general charge of Andrew T. Web- 
ster, organist and choir-master of St. Paul's. There was no sermon, 
and none was needed. The beauty and dignity of the President's 
character — long realized by his friends and intimates — had been fully 
and strongly revealed to the people during the patiently-borne suffer- 
ing of his last days. After he was shot, the President seemed to think 
only of others — that his murderer should not be harmed by the fury 
of the people — that his tenderly-loved, invalid wife should be gently 
told — that the interests of the Exposition might be uninjured. Of 
his assassin he spoke only words of pity, saying that " he knew not 
what he was doing." During his week of suffering, he made no com- 
plaints, but won the hearts of all his attendants by his brave cheer- 
fulness, his gentleness and thoughtfulness. Shortly before he passed 
into unconsciousness, which was only a few hours before the end, he 
spoke his farewell — " Good bye all, it is God's way. His will be done, 
not ours," — and he entered into rest with the faint words on his lips, 
of the hymn henceforth to be associated with all memories of him — 
" Nearer, my God, to Thee." 



The physicians of the President were many, during the hopeless 
fight for his life which occupied that anxious week. Among them, as 



History of St. Paul's Church. 241 

the surgeon who, with Dr. Mynter as his chief assistant, performed the 
skillful operation which it was hoped, and at first believed, would save 
his life, was Dr. Matthew D. Mann, who has been for several years 
a member of the vestry of St. Paul's. 

November 14, 1901, at a meeting of the vestry, it was decided to 
continue the " envelope system " of offerings, which has been in suc- 
cessful operation since 1894. The publication of the " Year Book" 
for 1901 was authorized, and an appropriation of fifty dollars for 
Christmas greens was made. The rector reported that the sum of 
$28,000 had been secured on the subscription, now being collected by 
the rector and committee, for the payment of the floating indebtedness 
and the $15,000 mortgage on the Parish House. The vestry resolved 
that all excess of the amount should be applied to reducing the mort- 
gage on the rectory. 

December 2, 1901, being Monday in the week beginning with the 
First Sunday in Advent, the annual election of the parish was held in 
St. Paul's Church for the election of a churchwarden for two years 
and three vestrymen for three years each. The rector presided, and 
the following persons were elected : William H. Walker, warden ; and 
Albert J. Barnard, Matthew D. Mann, M. D., and Charles R. Wilson, 
vestrymen. Those holding over from previous elections were : A. Por- 
ter Thompson, warden ; and James R. Smith, Edmund Hayes, James 
Sweeney, Sheldon T. Viele, Hobart Weed and John R. H. Richmond, 
vestrymen. 

December 21, 1901, at Emmanuel Church, Boston, Mass., took 
place the consecration of the Rev. Charles Henry Brent, D. D., to be 
Missionary Bishop of the Philippines. The " Churchman " of Decem- 
ber 28th speaks of this as " in many ways a memorable event. For 
the national Church it betokened an endeavor to keep pace with the 
country's growth, .... while in Boston it stood for the offering of 
one of the city's best-known and most valued clergymen for distant 
missionary work." .... During the rectorship of the Rev. Dr. 



242 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Brown at St. Paul's, Buffalo, previous to 1888, the Rev. Charles H. 
Brent was one of his assistants, and had special care of what was 
known at that time as St. Andrew's Mission. 

December 23, 1901, at a meeting of the vestry, Charles R. Wilson 
was elected clerk of the vestry and William A. Joyce treasurer of 
the parish, for the ensuing year. At the same meeting, on motion, it 
was resolved : " That the rector be relieved from the further pay- 
ment of interest on the mortgage covering the rectory, and from the 
further payment of taxes on said property." (See page 200.) 

Lorenzo Harris, who was appointed in September, 1893, is still the 
faithful and efficient sexton of the parish. 

The close of the year 1901 brings the church to within a few weeks 
of its eighty-fifth anniversary, which occurs on February 10, 1902 — 
the parish having been organized in the then small Village of Buffalo, 
on February 10, 1817. 

The tenth anniversary of the Rev. Dr. Regester's rectorate of St. 
Paul's also falls in 1902, our rector having taken charge in July, 
1892. (See page 193.) 

A decade marked by the thorough organizing, systematizing and 
broadening of all departments of the parish work, upon every detail 
of which is left the stamp of the rector's earnest and stimulating per- 
sonality, guiding and directing most wisely and well. 

A decade in which the loving respect and affection of his people 
have steadily increased, as they have come more and more to realize 
their rector's able and self-denying discharge of the exacting duties of 
his office, and how the constant demands made upon his time and 
strength by the growing work of the parish are never allowed to 
thrust aside his unfailing personal ministrations to the sick, the poor, 
and the sorrowing. 

The growth of St. Paul's is most strikingly shown in the '' Year 
Book," dated Advent, 1901. 

The first "Year Book" of St. Paul's was published at Advent, 



History of St. Paul's Church. 243 

1893. The nine annual books are most valuable, and in form, arrange- 
ment, and matter are models of what such publications should be. 
They are compiled and edited by the rector. Never, before these 
books were published, have the affairs of the parish — the finances, 
the various funds, the condition of the different societies, and the 
extensive work and membership of these numerous organizations — 
been so clearly and attractively explained to the people of St. Paul's. 
Never before has the entire congregation been brought so closely in 
touch with what is being accomplished, year by year, in the organized 
effort of the parish. 

The Prefatory Notes of the "Year Book" for 1901 has the 
following : 

" It is with great gratification tiiat the rector is able to state that in this eighty-fifth 
year of its life this parish has freed itself from the burden of indebtedness under wliich 
it has labored ever since the rebuilding of the church after the fire of 1888. The sub- 
scription for this object, proposed by the vestry last year, has been quietly brought to 
the attention of our people and has found them ready with a most generous response. 
It was asked at first that the two anniversaries occurring in 1902 — the eighty-fifth 
of the parish and the tenth of the present rectorate — be marked by the gift of 
$25,000 to be applied to the payment of the mortgage on the Parish House and 
the floating indebtedness. That amount was secured in the course of the summer 
and early autumn and the subscription has been carried on as speedily as might 
be without interference with other financial matters of the parish, until now it 
has reached a sum of over $28,000. This increased amount has been subscribed 
on the understanding that after the discharge of the other indebtedness the balance 
is to be applied to the payment of the debt on the rectory. The rectory was 
purchased in 1895 for $20,000. Five thousand of this amount was raised and paid at 
the time of the purchase. The expense of the rectory to the parish since that time has 
been only the amount of one-half of the taxes and the cost of some slight repairs. 
As agreed upon at the time of the purchase, the other half of the taxes and the interest 
on the mortgage of $15,000 placed on the property has been paid by the rector. The 
liberality of our people will enable the vestry to considerably reduce this mortgage and 
the rector is to be relieved of any further responsibility for the interest. This action 
of the vestry is made possible by the large saving of interest which will be effected by 
the payment of the debt. By this happy result of its brave effort the parish will find 
itself in its eighty-sixth year in this position : The debt of $lo,ooo remaining from 



244 History of St. Paul's Church. 

the rebuilding of the church paid, with a new Parish House and the $5,000 of debt on 
it entirely paid, with all floating indebtedness paid, with the rectory nearly one-half 
paid for, and the rector given the free use of his home, which has not been the case 
since Dr. Shelton's time ; and with an endowment fund grown large enough to make 
its annual increase, by accrument of interest alone, over five hundred dollars in the past 
year. " 

The names of subscribers to the above-mentioned subscription 
of 1901 will be found at page 437. 
The rector further says : 

.... "This 'Year Book' shows in what spirit, and with what power of achieve- 
ment, the parish comes to its eighty-fifth birthday. The whole conditions of its work 
have as entirely changed since it set itself to its spiritual task as has its environment. 
But your rector thinks that it never had higher ideals or more loyal spirit of service for 
Christ and His Church than it has to-day. And perhaps it never faced its work with 
greater strength and braver heart. The development of its life and the path by which 
it has come to what it is to-day will be fully shown in the ' History ' now in press. . 

' ' The endowment fund as given in the treasurer's statement last year amounted to 
#i3, 131.99. This year the amount given is $16,570.44. This increase represents the 
addition to the fund of the $3,000 bequeathed by Mrs. Agnes L. Warren, a gift of $10 
in the offering on Easter Day, and $528.45 of interest." 

In accordance with the Act passed by the State Legislature in 
1 90 1, given in full at page 234, the fund known as the Shelton Memo- 
rial Endowment Fund, and the later gifts made for the endowment of 
the parish, are now grouped under the general title, " The Permanent 
Endowment Fund," prescribed by said Act. 

THE PERMANENT ENDOWMENT FUND. 

The Shelton Memorial Fund . $6,095.44 

The George E. Hayes Memorial Gift, ... . ... . 2,000.00 

The Charlotte Kimberly Memorial Gift, . . . . .... 1,000.00 

The Jane Wey Grosvenor Memorial Gift, . . . 1,000.00 

Bequest of Miss Elizabeth Bull, . . ... 475.00 

Bequest of Hon. James M. Smith, . . . 3,000.00 

Bequest of Mrs. Agnes L. Warren, . 3,000.00 

$16,570.44 



History of St. Paul's Church. 245 

Advent, 1900, Total Fund, . . . . . . f 13,131. 99 

Offering at Easter .... 10.00 

Bequest of Mrs. Agnes L. Warren, ... . . . 3,000.00 

Interest, Erie County Savings Bank, . . . . ... 105.00 

Interest, Fidelity Trust Co., ... . ... 233.52 

Interest, Buffalo Savings Bank, ... . . . 89.93 

Balance, Advent, 1901, . . . $16,570.44 

(See pages 256, 292.) 

In order to place on record in this History of St. Paul's an outline 
of the organization and work of the parish as constituted at the pres- 
ent time, the following lists of the clergy, the vestry, the staff, and the 
various parish societies, compiled from the "Year Book " for 1901, are 
inserted here : 

St, paurs parish. 

HBuent, B. H>. 1901. 



Corporate ttftle : 

St. paul'e Cburcb in Buffalo." 



Ube Corporation. 

IRector. 
Rev. J. A. Regester, S. T. D. 

■^llIlat^en3. 
William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

Dcsttsmen. 

Albert J. Barnard, James Sweeney, Charles R. Wilson, 

James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele, Matthew D. Mann, M. D. , 

Edmund Hayes, Hobart Weed, John R. H. Richmond. 

Clecft to tbe Vestris. 
Charles R. Wilson. 



246 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



TTbe Staff. 



Clergs. 



Rev. J. A. Regester, S. T. D., Rector. 
Rev. Coleman E. Byram, Ph. D., Curate. 



Merritt Cook, 
Harry Faulkner, 



Hcolstes. 

Charles Stimpson, 
Noel Hartley, 
Roy Van Volkenburg. 



Howard Ganson, 
Maurice Cooper, 



Henry R. Howland, 
Thomas Lothrop, M. D. , 
Philip S. Smith, 
Henry Adsit Bull, 
Henry R. Hopkins, j\l. D , 



las 1Rea6ecs. 

Norman Rogers, Charles R. Wilson, 

J. N. Frierson, George T. Ballachey, 

Matthew D. Mann, M. D., F. W. Abbott, 
Alexander Hallowell, E. Corning Townsend, 

John R. H. Richmond, John K. Walker. 



|)aci9b Visitor. 
Miss Eva M. Smiley. 

Ureasurer. 
William A. Joyce. 

®cgaiifst anb dboicmaster. 
Andrew T. Webster. 



Seiton. 
Lorenzo Harris. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 247 

Services. 

SunDa^. 

8.00 A. M., Holy Communion. 
10.30 A. M., Litany. 
11.00 A. M., Morning Prayer, Holy Communion and Sermon. 

3. 15 P. M., Sunday School. 

4.00 P. M., Evensong and instruction (except in July and August). 

8.00 P. M. (in winter), Evensong and Sermon, preceded by half-hour Organ Recital. 



11.00 A. M. and 8.00 P. M., the second and fourth Sundays of each 
month, and 8.00 P. M., the first and third Sundays, services for deaf 
mutes are held in the Sunday School room. 



11Clcef?=£)aB. 

Morning Prayer, daily, except Wednesdays and Fridays, at 12.05. 

Litany, Wednesdays and Fridays, at 12.05. 

Holy Communion, Thursdays and Holy Days, at 11.00 A. M. 

The present number of communicants is given as 882. 



C:be (Tboir. 

The singing in the church is led by a vested choir of thirteen men 
and twenty-two boys and six ladies. 

The full choir sing at the morning service ; the boys and a volun- 
teer choir of the men at work in the Sunday School, at the afternoon 
service ; and the full choir at the night service. 

An organ recital is given every Sunday evening for half an hour 
before the service. 

®cgatitet an!) Cboicmaster. 
Andrew T. Webster. 



248 History of St. Paul's Church. 



Committees, ©roanisations, Societies, JEtc, advent, 1901. 

The Parish Committees. (Co-operating with the vestry. See page 
233 for members.) — 

On Condition and Repair of Parish House. — On Church Grounds and Church Repairs. 
— On Lights and Heating. — On Church Bells.^ On Pews and Pew Rentals. — On the 
Envelope System. — On the Sunday Morning Offering. 

Committee of Ushers. — O. H. P. Champlin, Chairman. 

The Altar Society. — President, The Rector; Treasurer, Miss E. C. Cottier; Sec- 
retary, Miss Florence Barnard. 

Committee on Altar Linen and Vestments of Clergy. — Miss Amelia Stevenson, Chair- 
man. 

Committee on Choir Vestments. — Mrs. M. D. Mann, Chairman. 

Committee on Care of Chancel and Floral Decorations. — Miss Florence Lee, Chairman. 

The Sunday School. — Rev. Coleman E. Byram, Superintendent. Teachers, 62; 
scholars, 363. 



The Sewing School. — Miss Amelia Stevenson, Directress. 

Dress Making Class ) ^^^^ ^j;^^ Hopkins, Instructor. 

The Home Sewing Class, ) '^ ' 

Cooking Classes. — Miss Clara E. Carr, Instructor^ 

The Kitchen Garden \ j^;^^ ^aura M. Weisner, Instructor. 

The Housekeepers' Class, ) ' 

The Girls' Gymnasium Class. — Miss Louise De Laney, Instructor. 

Boys' Athletic Association. 

The Girls' Friendly Society (Parish Chapter). — Mrs. M. A. Crockett, Branch Sec- 
retary ; 61 members. 

Candidates' Class (Girls' Friendly Society). — Miss Katharine Burtis, Associate in 
Charge ; 52 members. 

The Mothers' Meeting. — Mrs. Edward M. Atwater, President; 81 members. 

The Missionary and Benevolent Society. — President, Mrs. W. Bowen Moore ; Sec- 
retary, Mrs. Henry R. Rowland ; Treasurer and Purchaser, Mrs. Etta Ware Hill. 

The Evening Missionary Society. — President, Miss Josephine Persch; Secretary, 
Miss Elizabeth Brinkmann ; Treasurer, Miss Gertrude L. House. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 249 

The Guild of the Holy Child (Missionary).— President, Mrs. Elisha T. Smith; 
Warden, Miss May Barnard ; Secretary, Miss Alice A. Schenkelberger ; Treasurer, 
Miss Charlotte Regester. 

The Church Periodical Club. — Mrs. William Y. Warren, Parish Librarian. 

The Sick Relief (in co-operation with the District Nursing Association). — Head 
Worker, Mrs. Thomas K. Mann. 

The Shelton Society. — President, Mrs. T. K. Mann ; Vice-President, Mrs. Gifford 
Morgan ; Secretary and Treasurer, Miss Florence Lee. 

The Boys' Club. 

The Junior Boys' Club. — Rev. Coleman E. Byram, Director. 

The Men's Meeting. 

The Junior Department of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew. — Director, the Rector ; 
18 members. 

The Brotherhood of St. Andrew (Parish Chapter, No. 69). — Director, George T. 
Ballachey ; Secretary, John K. Walker ; Treasurer, George Van Volkenburg ; 23 
active members, 8 probationary members. 

The Deaf Mutes' Meeting. 

"Church District" (No. 50, in co-operation with the Charity Organization Society). 

A full account of the objects and work of the above organizations, 
together with their working force, members, etc., is given in the 
"Year Book." 

St. Paul's Church is represented on- the Associate Board of Man- 
agers of the Church Home by eighteen women of the parish, and on 
the " Ladies' Hospital Association " of the Buffalo General Hospital 
by four women of the parish. 

St. Paul's Parish is also well represented in the Laymen's Mission- 
ary League of the Diocese, which is an organization of men formed 
for missionary work in introducing the services of the Church, and 
forming new parishes in places throughout the diocese where the Church 
has never been definitely established. Services are also held by the 
League in prisons, hospitals, etc. 

It seems eminently fitting that the parish of St. Paul's should 
engage largely in this work, when we think of its own beginning as 
told earlier in this volume. Through the missionary efforts of Bishop 
Hobart the Church was planted in the then wilds of Western New York, 



250 History of St. Paul's Church. 

the first Episcopal parish on the "Holland Land Purchase" being 
organized in 181 1 in the town of Sheldon, Genesee County. St. Paul's 
Parish, Buffalo, was organized February 10, 181 7, the missionary being 
the Rev. Samuel Johnston, whose salary as missionary was paid from 
funds procured by the New York " Protestant Episcopal Society of 
Young Men.," (Seepage 11.) The "Missionary Stipend" of $175, 
and afterwards $125 per year, was paid to St. Paul's until the year 
1831, at which time it was thought that the parish should be entirely 
self-supporting. (See page 43.) 

Parishioners of St Paul's Church serving on Boards of Managers, 
Trustees, etc , of Public Institutions : 

The Chiirch Home. — Two members from St. Paul's on Board of Managers ; eight- 
een women of the Parish on Associate Board of Managers. 

Buffalo General Hospital. — Two members on Board of Trustees ; four women on 
Board of Managers. 

Home for the Friendless. — Two members on Board of Managers. 

Ingleside Home. — Four members on Board of Managers. 

District Nursing Association. — One member on Board of Managers. 

Newsboys'' and Bootblacks^ Home. — Two members on Board of Trustees; two mem- 
bers on Board of Managers. 

Fresh Air Mission. — One member on Board of Visitors. 

Homeopathic Hospital. — Three members on Board of Trustees ; three members on 
Board of Managers. 

Charity Organization Society. — Two members on Board of Trustees ; four members 
on Council. 

Wom.en^s Educational and Industrial Union. — Two members on Board of 
Directors. 

Tlie Prison- Gate Mission. — One member on Board of Managers. 

Young Alen^s Christian Association. — One member on Board of Trustees ; one mem- 
ber on Board of Directors. 

Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. — Two members on Board of 
Directors. 

The total contribution for public charity from St. Paul's Parish for 
the year ending Advent, 1901, was $10,406. 



</0s' 




PLAN OF RESTORED ST. PAUL'S, 
With names of pew holders in 1902. 



Compiled from the records and a drawing 
contributed by William Carson Francis. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 251 

1902. 

At a meeting of the vestry held on January 30, 1902, the vestry 
signed the canonical certificate required in Arthur S. Mann's applica- 
tion to the Standing Committee for recommendation by the committee 
to the bishop, for ordination to the diaconate. 

At the vestry meeting of April 21, 1902, a formal resolution was 
adopted in opposition to the proposed street railway track in Shelton 
Square. The president of the company was duly notified of the adop- 
tion of this resolution. 

At the above meeting, William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson 
and James Sweeney were chosen delegates to the Diocesan Council ; 
and Dr. M. D. Mann, J. R. H. Richmond and Henry Adsit Bull were 
chosen as alternates. 

By the bequest of Matthew O'Neill, long a parishioner of St. Paul's, 
who died May 18, 1902, aged eighty-two years, Hobart College receives 
$30,000 and the Church Charity Foundation $5,000. 

Mention has been made in these pages of the opposition of the 
vestry to the laying of a street railway track in Shelton Square to con- 
nect the present tracks in Erie and Niagara streets, so as to form a 
loop for running cars down Pearl, up Erie, and across to Niagara 
Street without going into Main. 

The following account of the controversy and the reasons for its 
subsequent settlement, are inserted here in order that the whole mat- 
ter may be put on record, and clearly understood by the members of 
the congregation. 

January 7, 1901, the Buffalo Railway Company attempted to lay a 
curve from Pearl Street into Erie Street to form the first connection 
in the proposed loop. This work was promptly stopped by an injunc- 
tion, which the church obtained through its attorney, Henry Adsit Bull. 

A few months later, all the street railway companies in Buffalo 
were merged in the International Railway Company, whose officials 
commenced to negotiate for the consent of the church to the proposed 



252 History of St. Paul's Church. 

tracks. The company stated that it had prepared comprehensive plans, 
in which the proposed loop was a vital feature, for rearranging all its 
lines in Buffalo ; and, further, if the church refused consent, that con- 
demnation proceedings would be commenced, and a fight would be 
made to obtain, through the courts, the right to lay the tracks. This 
statement was made without any hostile feeling toward the church, 
but because the street railway officials had decided that they must have 
the loop to render their service efficient. 

That the running of cars around three sides of the church during 
services would seriously interfere with religious worship was very evi- 
dent. Thus the interests of the church and the street railway con- 
flicted, and in this situation the church had to face the alternative of 
carrying on a long litigation against a wealthy corporation or giving 
its consent upon some terms. The proposal was made that the church 
might consent to the laying of the tracks on condition that cars should 
not be run over them during the hours of service on Sundays. The 
street railway officials said they could accept this condition, because 
their chief need of the tracks was at those hours on week-days when 
there was the greatest crush of passengers going to and returning 
from work. 

A special meeting of the vestry was held July 14, 1902, at which 
the whole subject was thoroughly discussed. The sense of the meet- 
ing was that the proposed arrangement would secure the church 
against the most serious effects that would result from laying the 
tracks. It was felt that the noise of the cars passing around the 
church could usually be kept out by shutting the windows, causing no 
special annoyance at week-day services, which are short and not largely 
attended. The decision was that it would be better to make the Sun- 
day services absolutely safe by giving the church's consent to the 
tracks on this condition, than to involve the church in a long and 
expensive litigation. The committee having charge of the matter was 
therefore instructed to make an agreement with the railway company 
on the general lines of the proposed arrangement. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 253 

An agreement was accordingly executed by the church and the 
International Railway Company, July 26, 1902, by which the discon- 
tinuance of the injunction action was provided for, and the church 
gave its consent to the proposed tracks. In return, the railway com- 
pany, for itself, its successors and assigns, covenanted that so long as 
religious services shall be regularly maintained in the church no cars 
shall be run on Sunday over the curve from Pearl into Erie Street, or 
over the track in Shelton Square, from 8 A. M. till 1.30 P. M., and 
from 3 P. M. till 9.30 P. M., except that during July and August 
cars may be run continuously after 1.30 P. M. The agreement fur- 
ther provides that in case of any change in the hours of service, the 
church may have any additional services protected by giving written 
notice of the fact. 

In case the railway company, or its successors or assigns, shall vio- 
late the agreement by running cars during the prohibited hours, then 
the church may require the tracks to be taken up, or may remove 
them itself at the railway company's expense, and all the rights of the 
company, its successors and assigns, shall thereupon cease. The 
agreement was prepared by the attorneys for the railway company and 
the church, and the binding force of all its provisions was approved 
by John G. Milburn, who, in giving this opinion, acted for both parties, 
and who rendered assistance in the negotiations. The agreement was 
delivered to Mr. Milburn to hold until additional consents should be 
secured. When the railway company obtains the required consents, 
the agreement then goes into effect at once. 

The injunction suit was discontinned by an order of court on July 
31, 1902, and thus all matters in dispute were finally settled. The 
entire result is that the greater part of a serious threatened injury to 
the church has been averted without expense or litigation ; while, if 
the arrangement had not been reached, the church would have had to 
wage a long fight in the courts, taking the chance of having the tracks 
finally laid without restrictions. 



254 History of St. Paul's Church. 

The original deed of the church lot from the Holland Land Com- 
pany, dated June 14, 1820, did not include two small triangular pieces 
of land, one adjoining the church lot immediately east of the present 
chancel and extending to the intersection of the north line of Erie 
Street prolonged, and the south line of Church Street prolonged, and 
the other triangle being at the northeast corner of Pearl and Erie 
streets and adjoining the church lot at or near the great tower. 

The triangle east of the chancel was within the boundaries of Wil- 
link Avenue (now Main Street) as laid out at the time of the original 
deed. The curve in Main Street, in front of "the churches," was 
straightened later (see page 16 and map, also pages 19, 174, 220), and 
the city, when it acquired title to the street by condemnation proceed- 
ings, took only the land within the present lines of Main Street. This 
development left the title to the triangle behind the chancel in the 
Holland Land Company and its successors. 

No reason has been discovered for the omission from the original 
deed of the triangle at Pearl and Erie streets, for those streets were 
originally laid out with the same boundaries that they have to- day. 

When the present fence 'was built around the church this last 
triangle and a portion of the triangle east of the chancel were enclosed 
without legal right. The Farmers' Loan & Trust Company of New 
York are the successors of the Holland Land Company, Franklin D. 
Locke of Buffalo being one of the directors. Through his kindly efforts 
and personal interest in the welfare of the church, the matter was 
brought before the board of directors of the Trust Company, and on his 
recommendation they gave to the church a deed conveying the two 
triangles, and also all rights of the company in adjacent streets, for 
the nominal consideration of one dollar. This deed is dated April 23, 
igo2, and was delivered to the church in July, 1902. (See page 262, 
and plan of church and lot in 1902, facing this page.) 

At the next meeting of the vestry, which was held on November 
6, 1902, a resolution was unanimously adopted thanking the Farmers' 
Loan & Trust Company for its gift, and another resolution was alos 




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History of St. Paul's Church. 255 

passed expressing the sincere gratitude of the church to Mr. Locke for 
his kind and successful efforts in the matter. 

On August 7, 1902, died Thomas Lothrop, M. D., for many years a 
prominent and well-known physician of the city, and a member of 
St. Paul's Parish. Dr. Lothrop was born in Provincetown, Massachu- 
setts, in 1836, and came to Buffalo in 1859 ; he was never married. 
He took a deep interest in the work of the Church Charity Founda- 
tion, and long served as president of the board of managers. Dr. 
Lothrop bequeathed to St. Paul's the generous sum of $5,000, with a 
request that it " be added to and form part of the Endowment Fund of 
said church." 

The broad concrete sidewalks which were laid in 1900, on the 
Church Street and Shelton Square frontages of St. Paul's, had 
so enhanced the appearance of the property that the desirability of 
laying similar sidewalks upon the Erie and Pearl Street frontages was 
apparent to all. In August, 1902, by private subscription, this work 
was accomplished, and the church is now entirely surrounded by broad 
stretches of concrete extending from the fence line to the curb. A 
great improvement to the general appearance of the church lot has 
thus been effected, now that, in the growth of the city and the daily 
passing of many feet, it is no longer possible to properly preserve the 
stretches of green turf which in earlier days filled in the spaces 
betweer] the old stone walks and the roadways. 

On October i, 1902, the Rev. Coleman E. Byram, Ph. D., curate at 
St. Paul's since November, 1899, left Buffalo to become rector of St. 
James's Church, Pittsburg, Pa. His faithful work in the parish has 
gained for him many friends. 

October i, 1902, the Rev. Mark H. Milne became the curate of St. 
Paul's. 

At the vestry meeting of November 6, 1902, the rector reported the 
gift of $100 to the Endowment Fund from Mrs. Abbott, in memory 



256 History of St. Paul's Church. 

of her husband, the late Frank W. Abbott, M. D,, for many years a 
valued member of the parish. Dr. Abbott died April 9, 1901. 

At this meeting, the formal vote of thanks to the Farmers' Loan 
and Trust Company, and to Mr. Locke, referred to above, was adopted. 

The additions to the Endowment Fund in 1902, up to November 
6th, will make the total amount about $22,000. (See page 262.) 

December i, 1902, being Monday in the week beginning with the 
First Sunday in Advent, the annual election of the parish was held in 
St. Paul's Church, for the election of a church warden for two years 
and three vestrymen for three years each. The rector presided, and 
the following persons were elected : A. Porter Thompson, warden ; and 
Edmund Hayes, Hobart Weed and James Sweeney, vestrymen. Those 
holding over from previous elections were : William H. Walker, 
warden ; and Albert J. Barnard, James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele, 
Charles R. Wilson, Dr. M. D. Mann and John R. H. Richmond, vestry- 
men. 

1903. 

On Sunday evening, January 4, 1903, at his home in Buffalo, died 
William H. Walker, senior warden of St. Paul's. 

Mr. Walker was born in Utica in 1825. Here his father, the late 
Stephen Walker, had been a vestryman in Trinity Church, and super- 
intendent of the Sunday School. The family removed to Buffalo in 
1832, and immediately became members of St. Paul's Parish. Stephen 
Walker was superintendent of St. Paul's Sunday School from 1833 for 
more than a quarter of a century, and was a member of St. Paul's 
vestry for fifteen years, from 1837 to 185 1. (See pages 95 and 96.) 

Coming to Buffalo with his father, mother and brother when he 
was seven years old, William H. Walker had grown up with the city 
and with St. Paul's, and followed the example of his father in his 
devoted and untiring interest in the work and progress of the parish. 
At the time the Walker family came to Buffalo (1832) the stage- 
coach and the Erie Canal were the principal means of travel between 



History of St. Paul's Church. 257 

Buffalo and Utica. Buffalo was incorporated as a city in 1832, with a 
population of 10,000, and, while flourishing and growing, it was looked 
upon as a frontier "western" town. Dr. Shelton had been at St. 
Paul's only three years. 

The public school system had not then been established, and 
William H. Walker received his early education in private schools and 
in the old Buffalo Academy. He also studied law for a time in the 
Albany Law School, but decided, when he was eighteen, to follow a 
business career, and entered the employ of Orrin P. Ramsdell, a pioneer 
in the wholesale shoe business in Western New York. In 1856, 
William H. Walker was admitted to a partnership, which continued 
until 1876, when it was dissolved and Mr. Walker engaged in the same 
business for himself. The house which he thus established has become 
one of the largest and most reliable in this part of the State. 

"In the business community, Mr. Walker stood for mercantile success, legitimate 
and substantial, based on fair methods and wise foresight, and in the world of finance, 
in which as a banker he played a part, he was a model of correct dealing and wise 
conservatism." . . . 

He was interested in everything that would further the progress 
and welfare of the city, and his solidity as a man and his ability as a 
financier carried him into many positions of responsibility and trust. 
He was always interested in educational, religious, and philanthropic 
institutions, and his interest manifested itself in a substantial way, by 
gifts and other active personal support. He was president of the 
Merchants' Bank, first vice-president of the Fidelity Trust Company, a 
trustee of Hobart College, former president of the clearing-house, 
former vice-president of the Buffalo Merchants' Exchange, vice- 
president and, at the time of his death, acting president of the Buffalo 
General Hospital, and a member of the Buffalo Club. As a trustee of 
Hobart College, he did much for that institution. Mr. Walker was one 
of the directors and chief supports of the Young Men's Christian 
Association in this city. He also was a member of the standing com- 
mittee of the Diocese of Western New York, continuously from 1866, 



258 History of St. PauV s Church. 

and active in the Councils of the diocese, and the General Conventions, 
and a life member of the Buffalo Historical Society. 

Mr. Walker was actively interested in parish work from his early 
years. In 1846, he was a member of the first committee appointed to 
seat strangers in church. About the year 1847 was formed what was 
then, and for some years after, popularly known as the " Junior Vestry," 
composed of four young men of the parish, Charles W. Evans, William H. 
Walker, George C. Webster and De Witt C. Weed. They were so called 
from their active interest in parish affairs, and especially in advocating 
the building of the new stone edifice, and for their efforts in influencing 
subscriptions to the building fund. These four young men started 
the St. Paul's Building Fund Association, October 24, 1847, and thus 
began the first concerted work for the building of the new edifice, and 
their names head the list of the association which was formed. (Page 
58.) The " Junior Vestry " also started the " Chime Fund Association," 
in September, 1850, and William H. Walker was the first secretary and 
treasurer, followed later by Charles W. Evans. William H. Walker 
was first elected a member of the vestry at Easter, 1858, and was a 
member of every succeeding vestry until his death, excepting for the 
year 187 1. He was thus a member of forty-five vestries, serving 
longer than any other member since the foundation of St. Paul's, in a 
parish remarkable for the long terms of so many of its vestrymen. At 
Easter, 1872, he was elected junior warden, followed at Easter, 1873, by 
the late Samuel G. Cornell. At Easter, 1874, Mr. Walker was again 
elected junior warden, continuing in the office until the death of the 
senior warden, Charles W. Evans, February 8, 1889. Mr. Walker 
succeeded as senior warden, and was retained in the office continuously 
until his own death, in January, 1903. During all of these years, Mr. 
Walker's devotion to the interests of his beloved parish never flagged. 
He was always ready to give freely both of advice from his ripened 
business judgment and of financial gifts from his always generous 
purse. He was an intimate friend of the late Dr. Shelton, who had 
for him the greatest affection and appreciation, and who made him, 



History of St. Paul's Church. 259 

with Charles W. Evans, one of the executors of his estate. All of the 
subsequent rectors of St. Paul's have likewise found Mr. Walker a 
tower of strength, sustaining them as he did in all of the enterprise 
and good work of the parish, both with judicious and wise advice and 
liberal and continuous gifts. In the vestry, and as chairman of the 
finance committee for many years, Mr. Walker's judgment and far- 
seeing business ability were relied upon by all. He it was, too, who 
presented many of the terse and gracefully written resolutions and 
memorials adopted by the vestry. For this diflficult form of composition 
he seemed to have a special gift. He was a constant and devout 
attendant at divine service, always present in his place ; a strong 
churchman, a deeply religious man. After St. Paul's was destroyed by 
fire in 1888, Mr. Walker was foremost in furthering the restoration of 
the edifice, which has resulted in the present harmoniously beautiful 
church. He was a member of the building committee, and one of the 
most generous contributors to the building fund. This was likewise 
the case in the building of the new Parish House, on the site of the old 
rectory, and in the purchase of the present rectory in Johnson's Park. 

In 1869, Mr. Walker was married to Miss Edith Kimberly, youngest 
daughter of the late John L. Kimberly, and a life-long member of St. 
Paul's. Mrs. Walker died December 6, 1893. (See pages 197, 19S.) 

Their children, all of whom survive their parents, are John Kim- 
berly Walker, William H. Walker and Evelyn Walker. 

"The plain but strong old Anglo-Saxon word 'good' applied to humanity means 
'kind, benevolent, humane, gracious, propitious, friendly.' No epitaph more fitting, 
more expressive could be written for the late William H. Walker. He closed last 
evening — a Sunday evening, marking the end of a twelve hours that he invariably 
set apart for religious work — a record of sixty years' service rendered in Buffalo, and, 
wherever those who knew him are talking about that death, the inevitable expression 
will be : ' He was a good man. ' He had fought a good fight upon every line. " .... 
" In every relation of life he was upright and just, and bore himself withal so kindly 
that he offended none and made the example of a good life attractive ; much of the 
good he helped to establish lives after him." . . . [Quotations from editorials in 
Buffalo papers.] 



26o History of St. Paul's Church. 

At a meeting of the vestry of St. Paul's, held at the Parish House 
on Monday, January 5, 1803, the following resolutions, prepared by 
Mr. Viele, on the death of the senior warden, William H. Walker, 
were unanimously adopted by a rising vote, and directed to be entered 
upon the minutes : 

MEMORIAL. 

WilUam Henry Walker, for many years the senior warden of St. Paul's Church, 
entered into rest January 4, 1903. From his boyhood, Mr. Walker was a consistent 
and earnest member of this parish. It was during his early manhood that the first stone 
edifice of St. Paul's was erected. To this work he gave energy and enthusiasm. With 
three other young men he formed an organization which was known as the " Junior 
Vestry. " They assisted in raising funds, and in arousing the spirit of the people, and 
co-operated in many ways in the work. 

He later became a vestryman, then junior warden, and finally senior warden, thus 
spending his entire life of usefulness in the active service of our parish. During this 
long period he was a faithful worker and a consistent and liberal contributor to all the 
needs of the church. He was especially interested in the building of the first stone 
church, in the reconstruction of that beautiful edifice in its present form, after the fire, 
and in the completion of the buildings of the parish free from debt. He has passed 
away just as his labors in this direction have been crowned with success. He has left 
to others this example of devotion to duty as an incentive to the perpetuation of the 
work so well begun. In the general life of the church, Mr. Walker has long had a. 
large and honorable place. For many years he has served as one of the representatives 
of this parish in the Annual Council of the Diocese, and for more than thirty years has 
been honored by the diocese with a place on the Standing Committee, and has also 
several times been elected by the Diocesan Council as one of its lay deputies to the 
General Convention. 

The vestry part from their leader with a sense of almost irreparable loss. The 
congregation will long miss his accustomed presence. His long life of duty well done, 
of consistent loyalty to the church, of broadening charity to his fellows, will ever form 
one of the blessed memories of old St. Paul's. 

At this meeting of January sth, the rector presented the request of 
Mrs. Robert Preston Wilson, Philip S. Smith and Charles R. Wilson 
for permission to place a suitable bronze tablet in St. Paul's Church 
to the memory of the Hon. James M. Smith. The placing of the tablet 
was referred to the committee on memorials. 



History of St. Paul's Church. 261 

The vestry then adjourned, out of respect to Mr. Walker's memory. 

At the vestry meeting of January 12, 1903, the rector presiding, 
Charles R. Wilson, vestryman, was unanimously elected by the vestry 
as warden, to serve out the unexpired portion of the late Mr. Walker's 
term of office. Mr. Wilson became the junior warden of the parish, 
Mr. Thompson having succeeded Mr. Walker as the senior warden. 
To fill the vacancy among the vestrymen caused by the election of Mr. 
Wilson as warden, the vestry thereupon elected E. Howard Hutchinson 
for Mr. Wilson's unexpired term as vestryman. 

John Kimberly Walker was elected clerk of the vestry for the 
ensuing year. William A. Joyce, the efficient treasurer of the parish 
for the past ten years, having desired to be relieved from the duties of 
the office, John M. Provoost was elected treasurer of the parish for the 
ensuing year. 

The thanks of the vestry were voted to the persons who have con- 
tributed to the music for the past year. 

At the vestry meeting of January 26, 1903, the following resolution 
of thanks to the retiring treasurer, William A. Joyce, was adopted and 
ordered spread upon the minutes : 

' ' Resolved, That the vestry of St. Paul's Church, recognizing the valuable services 
rendered by Mr. William A. Joyce as its treasurer, covering a long period of years ; 
and being deeply sensible of the large measure of his time devoted to the details of 
that office, and of the fidelity and business ability exercised by him in its administration, 
now wish to express to him their cordial appreciation of his devotion to the interests of 
the parish, and thank him for the very able manner in which he has discharged the 
duties as such treasurer." 

At this meeting, also, electric lights were ordered placed in the main 
tower of the church, the expense to be paid from the bell fund. 

In March, 1903, Shelton Square was widened seven feet by the 
straightening of the line of the adjoining Main Street sidewalk. The 
stone posts and adjacent raised sidewalk, popularly known as the 
"Island of Safety," between Main Street and Shelton Square, opposite 
the head of Church Street (see pages 219, 220), were moved seven feet 



262 History of St. Paul's Church. 

towards the east, to bring the curb at this point into line with the 
westerly curb of Main Street. 

The street railway track, which had been the subject of so much 
controversy, was then laid in Shelton Square, and the first cars passed 
over it on Monday, April 13th. (See pages 238, 251, 252, 253.) 

The collections at St. Paul's on Easter Sunday, April 12, 1903, 
increased the Endowment Fund by over sixteen hundred dollars. 
Fifty dollars of this was an addition to the Frank W. Abbott memorial 
gift. 

The deed of the triangles of land given to the church in 1902 (see 
page 254) was recorded in the Erie County Clerk's office on April 16, 
1903, in Liber 956 of Deeds, at page 497. 

This record ends April 16, 1903. 




THE RESTORED ST. PAUL'S, FROM THE SITE OF THE PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 

The removal of the old dwellings for the erection of the present Prudential Building, 

southwest corner of Church and Pearl streets, afforded the only opportunity 

for obtaining- a photographic view of St. Paul's from this point. 



Photograph by G. H. E , :\Iarcli, iS 



Ube IRestoreJ* St. Paul's. 
Ube /iDemorials. 

Ubc Cbimes of St. Paul's. 
Ube ©reat XCower anb Spire. 
Ube /IDuslc, 1817*1903. 
ibistorfcal motes, 1817*1903. 

Historical Outline, 1817-1903. 

The Seal of the Corporation, 

First Roman Catholic Mass in Buffalo. 

Notes on the Early Rectors. 

Extracts from Old Letters. 

Major Noah's City. 

Accounts and Anecdotes of the Rev. Dr. Shelton. 

Early Years of the Church in Buffalo. 

The Bank of England and St. Paul's. 

Account of the Founding of a Free Church, 1849. 

Removal of the Frame Edifice. 

The Numbering of the Pearl Street Rectory. 

The Wooden Model of the Church, 1850. 

Notes on the Sunday School. 

St. Paul's Guild (contributed). 

Extracts from Minutes of the Building Committee, 1888-1889. 

OList of tbe Clergs of St. Paul's, 1817=1903. 
Xist of tbe Destrs, 1817*1903. 
Zbc arcbitects of St. Paul's. 
Subscription 3Lists. 
IFn Conclusion. 



. . . . " The Christian Sanctuary is emphatically the sphere of the Holy Spirit's 

operation on the hearts and minds of men 

" Here He strives with the sinner — here He dwells with the saint — here He regen- 
erates, sanctifies, governs, comforts, commissions, guides and blesses the ransomed 

children of men, in the great work of leading them through the trials of earth 

" Such, my brethren, are the characteristics of this Holy Temple, now consecrated to 
God. A House of Prayer, Praise, Instruction, Vows and Grace. As such we have 
now set it apart and hallowed it as God's. As such may we ever enter it. As such 
may it ever be maintained. As such may the Divine Blessing ever rest upon it, and as 
such may it prove to all who serve and worship in it, the vestibule to conduct to that 
Higher Temple, not made with hands, eternal in the Heavens." .... 

— From Bishop DeLancey^s 
Sermon at the Consecration 
of St. Paul's, iS^i. 



" Dear Cross ! bol5 fast tbg beigbt in air ; 

Stan6 ever wl&e, blest Boor! 
an5 ever crowd, ige faftbful, tberc, 

Ibfgb, lowlB, rfcb, an& poor! 
Sweet bells! ring ever Bour glaD soun&, 

an& let Its message be— 
Ibo! Be tbat tbirst — bere Cbrist Is toun&, 

Hn5 bere Ibis borne is free." 

— 3Bisbop Coie. 



The Restored St. Paul's. 265 

Ube lRestore& St. Paul's. 

THE RESTORED CHURCH WAS OPENED BY BISHOP COXE WITH A SERVICE OF HAL- 
LOWING AND RECONCILING, JANUARY 3, 189O. (See pages 182, 183.) 

As has been said, the fire of May lo, 1888, destroyed the entire 
interior of the church, with its columns, roofs, furniture and memorials. 
The main tower, with the graceful tapering spire, was nearly unharmed, 
as was the smaller tower, but the upper portions of the walls of the 
edifice were badly damaged, and had to be rebuilt in many places. 

The plans of the architect, Robert W. Gibson of New York (archi- 
tect of All Saints' Cathedral, Albany), were accepted, Cyrus K. Porter 
& Son of Buffalo acting as supervising architects. It was thought best 
to make some changes in the plans of the church, as originally designed 
and built by the late Richard Upjohn, Sr. The chancel was car- 
ried out thirteen feet towards the east, and the beautiful stone entrance 
porch and vestry room on the Church Street side of the edifice were 
added, to take the place of the smaller north porch and vestry room 
of the older edifice. In the old church, the chancel organ was 
crowded into a small space over the vestry room. In the new church, 
a much larger organ chamber was formed by using, in addition, the 
space below, formerly occupied by the old vestry room. The former 
Church Street, or north, porch, with the room over it, were transformed 
into the baptistery of the present edifice. Although the chancel was 
extended thirteen feet on the outside, the gain in length on the inside 
is about fifteen feet. This was caused partly by changes made in the 
chancel arch — the jambs of which are now nearly flush with the side 
vyalls — and by not "furring out " the inside of the east wall of the 
chancel with wood as heavily as in the old church. The width of the 
chancel is also increased by a similar treatment of the inside of the 
walls, and the gain, both in size and appearance, is very marked. 
Other important changes were also made which will be noted later. 

The general style used in rebuilding the church is in harmony with 
the Early English Gothic of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries used 
in the original edifice. Many of the features, however, especially the 



266 History of St. Paul's Church. 

great east window, the chancel furniture, pulpit, etc., are quite properly 
of later date, being in the Decorated Gothic of the thirteenth and 
fourteenth centuries ; while the hammer-beam, open-timbered roof is 
a fine example of the beautiful roofs of the fourteenth and fifteenth 
centuries. The blending of the old and new work is skillfully and suc- 
cessfully carried out, and the general effect of the restoration is most 
harmonious and imposing.* 

The Pillars. — The north and south aisles are divided from the body 
of the nave by tall clustered pillars of brown sandstone, the design 
being a square central shaft surrounded by four round, engaged col- 
umns ; the capitals are beautifully carved with foliage having the stiff 
stem or stalk characteristic of the Early English style. The bases are 
moulded and much stilted — the plinths being raised to the height of 
the pew tops. The columns supporting the transept arches are of sim- 
ilar design, but larger, having six round, engaged shafts, which, at the 
sides, are coupled and separated by fillets. Half-pillars or responds 
are built into the walls at either end. These stone pillars replace the 
old wooden pillars, which were destroyed in the fire of 1888, but are 
two less in number, owing to the greater width of the transept arches 
in the nave, next to the chancel, in the new plan. (See "The Nave" 
page 267.) 

Tall pointed arches of masonry, richly moulded and decorated in 
gold and colors, spring from the stone pillars. 

The Clere-Story. — Above the arches is the clerestory, which is one 
of the most striking and beautiful features of the new building. It 
has sixteen lancet-pointed windows on either side, in groups of four 
windows above each bay. The clere-story shows what is known as a 
double plane of ornament ; the arches of the windows in the stone wall, or 



* For description of the original frame church, see page 16, and footnote, page 32. 
For the article published in the "Gospel Messenger" in 1851, describing the stone 
edifice as it was then, see page 68. For a later description of the church, from the 
" Church Kalendar," 1883, see page 141. For accounts of the tower and spire, see 
pages 108-UO, 310, 311 and 314. 



The Restored St. Paul's. 267 

outer plane, are of lancet form, while the inner plane of ornament 
forms a range of pointed trefoiled arches above each window, sup- 
ported on clustered shafts. 

The range of the nave arches is continued by blind arches on both 
sides of the west bay, which is mostly occupied by the west gallery 
and main vestibule. 

The Nave, 104 feet long inside, including the main vestibule under 
the west gallery, is divided into five bays or arched divisions. North and 
South Transepts are formed by making the bay on either side next the 
chancel thirty-four feet wide, twice the width of the other bays, which 
are about seventeen feet each ; the arches spanning the openings 
into the transepts extend nearly up to the top of the clere-story walls, 
and the north and south walls of the transepts opposite these arches 
are carried up in tall pointed gables, whose sharply-pitched roofs inter- 
sect that of the body or central division of the nave at right angles. 
In each of these north and south gables is a circular or wheel win- 
dow ; another of these windows is high up in the west end of the 
church. The north and south walls of the transepts are flush with 
those of the north and south aisles of the nave. 

The impressiveness of the interior of the church is greatly enhanced 
by the increased effect of breadth and height given by these wide and 
lofty transept arches, together with the transept gables and the clere- 
story. These changes in the old design give the much-desired Cruci- 
form effect to the main edifice, whether viewed from the exterior or 
interior. 

It is a tribute to the skill of Mr. Gibson, the architect, that these 
successful results were obtained with very slight alterations in the 
original ground plan of this part of the church as built by Mr. Upjohn. 
A comparison of the ground plans of the church before the fire and 
as rebuilt gives but little information of these particular changes, suc- 
cessfully carried out in the superstructure, after the fire of 1888. (See 
the various illustrations and plans of St. Paul's before and after the 
fire, in this volume.) 



268 History of St. Paul's Church. 

The Side Aisles (north and south) occupy three bays of the nave, 
and are each fifty-one feet six inches long ; adding the transepts 
gives a length of eighty-five feet six inches. 

It should, perhaps, be explained here that the terms north and south 
aisles are used, not as referring to the alleys between the pews, com- 
monly called " aisles," but in their architectural meaning, to designate 
the flat-roofed divisions of the edifice on either side of the central 
division, or body, of the nave. In the church as rebuilt, these aisles 
end and the transepts begin at the columns from which spring the 
western extremities of the lofty transept arches, and above these col- 
umns it will be noticed that the flat roofs of the north and south aisles 
meet the slanting roofs of the transept gables. The body of the nave 
extends one bay to the west beyond the side aisles ; this fifth bay 
is mostly filled, as stated above, by the main vestibule and west gallery. 
On each side of the main vestibule are the south — or Erie Street — 
porch, and the northwest porch leading to Pearl Street. The small 
rooms over these two porches connect by doorways with the west gal- 
lery, and look down into the north and south aisles of the nave 
through pointed arched openings with oak balustrades, similar to the 
oak balustrade which extends across the front of the west gallery. 
This gallery space, formerly occupied as the organ loft, in the western 
end of the nave, and which, in the old edifice, extended out into the 
church to afford accommodation for the famous chorus-choir, is now of 
less depth and has been fitted with pews, which are free. The space 
under the gallery forms the main vestibule, and is separated from the 
nave by a handsome screen of oak and glass. Immediately under the 
balustraded openings mentioned above are deeply-recessed, pointed- 
arched niches, which in former years, when the church was first built, 
were doorways through the stone walls at the west end of the north 
and south aisles, as can be seen in the picture of the ruins of the west- 
ern end of the church, and the 1851 plan, opposite pages 168, 84. (See 
also page 69 and note, and pages 100, loi.) 

The Lancet Windows, marking the first period of the Early English 



The Restored St. Paul's. 269 

style, extend along the south aisle and in the wall of the west bay of 
the north aisle up to the point where the chapel joins ; there are five 
of these windows in the south transept, and two in each of the smaller 
bays. 

The north and south aisles are each fifteen feet six inches wide, 
and the body, or central division of the nave, is thirty feet wide. 

The entire inside width of the nave, including the north and south 
aisles, is, therefore, sixty-one feet and, adding " the chapel," gives a 
total inside width to the church of ninety feet. The greatest outside 
length of the edifice is 190 feet, and the greatest outside width is 103 
feet, including the buttresses. 

There are four principal entrances to the church : two on Pearl Street, 
one on Erie Street, and one on Church Street, the latter being through 
the handsome stone north porch, erected since the fire. This porch 
has a floor of marble mosaic, and contains two large traceried 
windows filled with stained glass — one opening onto Church Street, 
and the other, immediately opposite, lighting the baptistery. The ceil- 
ing is of paneled wood. The doorway leading from this porch into 
the chapel was, in the old church, a window, in front of which the font 
was placed. Under this porch is a broad entrance, also built since 
the fire, leading from Church Street to the crypt and choir-rooms. 
The main entrance to the Sunday School room in the basement is on 
the Pearl Street side, and to the left of this is another entrance, which 
now leads to the furnaces, but which, in former years, was the doorway 
to the receiving vault. 

The main entrances on Pearl Street, to the west end of the nave, 
are especially massive, the stone steps leading from the west porch and 
the northwest porch curving towards each other to meet at the broad 
stone platform at the Pearl Street gate. The steps and platforms 
were not injured in the fire of 1888, but the fine arched west porch, 
with its stone-vaulted ceiling, was badly damaged and had to be largely 
rebuilt. In the north wall of this western porch is a narrow lancet win- 
dow filled with stained glass. The original glass in this window, which 



270 History of St. Paul's Church. 

was unfortunately destroyed in the fire of 1888, was placed there by 
Dr. Shelton, as a memorial to his personal friend, the Rev. Thomas 
Bowdler of Brompton, London, a much-loved clergyman of the Church 
of England, a prebendary of St. Paul's Cathedral, London, and a gen- 
erous contributor to the fund for the erection of this porch. (Page 
431.) The original window was put in place about the year 1856, and 
was inscribed with the name of the Rev. Mr. Bowdler, who died in 1855. 

Above the gable of the west porch is the flying buttress, which, 
although just under the "fire mark" on the main tower, was fortu- 
nately not injured by the flames. It springs from the corner buttress of 
the porch to the main tower, and, according to tradition, was inserted 
in the original design by the architect, Mr. Upjohn, at the request of 
Dr. Shelton. It was not in the preliminary design. (See page 314.) 

The south, or Erie Street, porch, and the northwest porch leading to 
Pearl Street, are interesting as examples of the ancient two-story stone 
porches which are occasionally met with in the old churches of Eng- 
land, where the room over the porch was used for the safe- keeping of 
records, books, wills and other valuables. In the older edifice, the orig- 
inal Church Street porch, which has now been transformed into the 
baptistery, was also a two-story porch. In 1879, in the early days of 
the veste4 choir, the second story of the Church Street porch was 
fitted up for the keeping of the choir vestments. From the Erie Street, 
or south, porch a stairway leads up, through the small room over the 
porch, to the west gallery, formerly the loft for the great organ and 
chorus-choir. Under this stairway is another, leading down to the Sun- 
day School room in the basement ; and at the west end of the porch a 
door opens through the massive stone wall into the tower room, from 
which leads the winding stairway to the belfry of the great tower and 
to the lofty spire above. In the tower room is a large oak cabinet, 
fitted with folding racks, for the preservation of the embroidered 
altar cloths of the church. This cabinet was given by Miss Amelia 
Stevenson, who has also executed much of the elaborate and artistic 
needlework on the altar cloths and linen. 



The Restored St. Paul's. 271 

There is a private entrance for the clergy directly from Church 
Street into the beautiful little Vestry Room, which has been built 
since the fire and which adjoins the new north porch. This room is 
12 X 16 feet in size, and the walls are paneled seven feet high with 
antique oak, as is also the ceiling. It is lighted by a bay window of 
Gothic design, filled with stained glass. Doorways open from this 
room into the chancel, and into a winding passage behind the organ 
leading to the church through the baptistery. 

All the main entrance doors of the church are double, of heavy, 
paneled oak, and are all hung to swing outward. 

The Roof of the body of the nave, modeled after the beautiful ham- 
mer-beam roofs of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, is an open- 
timbered one of fine design, the spandrels filled with geometrical pierced 
work. It is of spruce, stained and finished to match the oak wood- 
work. Spruce, from its strength, and greater lightness than oak, is 
particularly suitable and much used for work of this kind. The pen- 
dant posts which, with the curved hammer-braces, form the triangular 
supports under the hammer-beams, are carried on slender vaulting 
shafts, rising from corbels between the springings of the arches of the 
nave, excepting over the points of the transept arches, where the 
hammer-beams rest directly upon corbels of carved stone, above the 
apex of the arches. The ends of the hammer-beams bear the carved 
and gilded figures of angels, with outstretched wings. 

The roof is sharply pitched, and is divided into six bays or sec- 
tions, which are ceiled with narrow, matched boards, and paneled in 
large squares by the heavy longitudinal beams and light moulded 
cross-ribs. At the top of the walls, between the hammer-beams, is a 
broad band of wooden panel-work, forming a cornice or frieze, and 
covering the open space behind. The spandrels of the lofty transept 
arches are decorated with symbols of the four evangelists, in colored 
fresco work. The spandrels of the arches opening from the body of 
the nave into the side aisles, on either side, are decorated with medal- 
lion heads of the Twelve Apostles, finely executed in colors. Above 



272 History of St. Paul's Church. 

the lofty chancel arch is a fine fresco representing a group of 
angels in adoration. The spandrels of the blind arches in the west 
bay of the nave are decorated with symbolic designs. 

The roofs of the side aisles are flat, and are ceiled with narrow 
matched boards, in antique oak finish, divided into square panels by 
light moulded ribs or beams. 

Supporting the roofs of the north and south aisles, at right angles 
to the body of the nave, are pointed arches of wood, the spandrels of 
which are filled with pierced timber work in geometrical design. In 
the north aisle, these wooden arches spring from the stone pillars of 
the nave and chapel. In the south aisle, they spring from the stone 
pillars of the nave and from carved corbels in the outer wall. They 
are also placed against the walls at the ends of each aisle. 

The roofs of the transepts are in antique oak finish, ceiled with 
narrow matched boards ; the spaces between the heavy timbers are 
divided by light moulded ribs, or beams, into square panels placed 
diagonally. 

The inside of the outer wall of the south aisle is divided into large 
panels placed opposite to the pillars of the nave and ornamented with 
nook shafts. Across the top of each panel runs a corbel table sup- 
porting the timbers of the roof of the south aisle. 

In the center of the south wall of the south transept is a gabled 
niche, ornamented with crockets and finial, containing the marble bust 
of the late Sheldon Thompson. (See page 292.) 

The width of the middle alley, or " aisle," between the pews, in 
the body of the nave, is seven feet six inches, and that of the alleys of 
the north and south aisles is four feet eight inches. 

" The Chapel" an extensive addition to the main edifice on the 
north side, is fifty feet long inside, from east to west, and twenty- 
eight feet six inches deep. It is connected with the main body of 
the church by three lofty arches of masonry, the easterly one of which 
opens into the westerly half of the north transept, and the other two 
into the north aisle. 



O 3- 

■c o 



W3 



o 7^ 

3 [T. 



_ '-J 




The Restored St. Paul's. 273 

This range of arches is continued one bay towards the east by the 
archway between the baptistery and the north transept, and one bay 
towards the west beyond the open arches by an arched panel in the 
wall of the north aisle. 

The arches spring from brown sandstone clustered pillars of the 
same height as those on either side of the body of the nave, but more 
slender. These pillars are about seventeen feet apart and are placed 
opposite the corresponding pillars of the nave, and carry also some of 
the wooden arches and pierced work which support the roof of the 
north aisle. The seats in " the chapel " face south, being at right 
angles with the pews in the body of the church, and rise towards the 
north in three gradations of four inches each. In the east and west 
ends of " the chapel," high in the wall, are large stained-glass win- 
dows. Under the western one of these is a window which is interest- 
ing as representing one of the first forms of Early English " plate " 
tracery — pierced through a plate of stone — which in the later forms 
of Gothic architecture developed into the elaborate and delicate 
" bar " tracery. 

In the gable, formed in the center of the north side of " the 
chapel," is a window in the shape of a spherical triangle, filled with 
stained glass, immediately above the beautiful window which is a 
memorial to the late Mrs. Shelton. (See page 295.) On each side of 
this last-named window are two tall lancet windows, similar to those in 
the body of the church. 

The roof of " the chapel " is an open timbered one of similar design 
to that in the nave, but on a smaller scale, and is broken in the center 
by a north gable. In the east wall of "the chapel " is the entrance 
door from the Church Street, or north, porch, and to the north of this 
door is the broad stairway leading down to the choir-rooms and the 
Sunday School room and chapel in the basement or crypt. 

In 1851, when the church was first used, "the chapel" was divided 
into a lower floor and a gallery. The portion below the gallery was 
separated from the body of the church by a glass partition, while the 



274 History of St. Paul's Church. 

gallery filled the entire upper portion, and opened into the nave by 
three arches, similar in size to the present arches. The seats in this 
gallery faced south, towards the body of the church, and were at right 
angles to it, rising on a slant toward the north wall of the chapel. In the 
room under the gallery, the pews faced towards the east. In 1856, the 
glass partition between the lower floor of " the chapel " and the body of 
the church was taken down, and in 1857, the gallery above was removed, 
with Mr. Upjohn's approval. (See page 84.) The peeling off of the 
plaster in the fire of 1888 revealed the floor line of this old gallery. 
(See page 70 and note ; also photograph of ruins facing page 166.) In 
1867, at Mr. Upjohn's suggestion, all those pews in " the chapel " north 
of its south aisle were changed to face south. After the fire, this aisle 
was moved south to the pillars, and all the chapel pews now face south. 
This portion of the church has always been appropriately known by the 
old name, although its use as a separate chapel has long been discon- 
tinued. The term is also in harmony with its architectural design, which 
is that of a side, or attached, chapel, and not a transept. In Mr. 
Upjohn's preliminary design, the chapel was only one-half the height 
finally adopted. (See page 314.) 

The Baptistery is at the north end of the north transept, and opens 
into it through a large moulded archway, which is a continuation of the 
range of arches between the main edifice and " the chapel." At the west 
end of the baptistery a smaller archway leads into " the chapel "; in the 
old church, this opening was the doorway from the Church Street porch. 
The baptistery occupies the space formerly filled by the old Church Street 
porch and the room over it, before the fire. The large, traceried, stained- 
glass window immediately back of the font in the present baptistery 
fills the space once occupied by the outer doorway of the old porch. 

The baptistery is a large alcove, containing the handsome brown 

sandstone font, which was given to the church by William D. 

Collingwood. (See pages 181, 288, 394.) The walls are decorated in 

colors with symbolic designs ; around the top is a frieze with the words : 

" Be baptized, every one of you, in the Name of Jesus Christ." 



The Restored St. Paul's. 275 

A door in the east wall of the baptistery leads into the vestry room 
through a winding passage, and also to the circular stairway of the 
small tower. In the north wall is the traceried window, spoken of 
above, looking into the north porch, and also four smaller windows. 

In the frame church the font was near the chancel rail. When the 
stone church was consecrated in 185 1 this old font stood at the east end 
of the nave immediately in front of the chancel, and a little to the north 
of the line of the center alley or "aisle." It was placed on the floor of 
the nave just in front, or west, of the position occupied in the restored 
church by the present brass lectern. (See pages 59, 70.) When the 
interior of the church was decorated and the chancel refurnished in 1867, 
the font, at Mr. Upjohn's suggestion, was removed to a platform at the 
east end of the chapel, in front of the window which has now become 
the entrance from the chapel to the new north, or Church Street, porch. 

This old font of white marble was destroyed in the fire of 1888. 
The various positions of the font are shown in the plans and illustrations 
opposite pages 34, 84, 138, 154, 250, 272. 

The Chancel. — The chancel is divided into the Choir and Sanctuary, 
and opens into the nave through a lofty, pointed arch, deeply recessed 
and moulded. The mouldings of the inner rim of the chancel arch 
are carried upon small, corbelled shafts, and the outer mouldings rest 
upon small shafts, which, in turn, rest upon slender nook-shafts recessed 
into the angles of the flat, pilaster- like jambs of the archway, which 
project only five inches beyond the side walls of the chancel. In 
this way the space between the jambs of the arch is made about 
four feet wider than in the chancel archway of the old church. The 
new arch is also considerably higher than the former one. 

The Choir is raised three steps above the body of the church, the 
steps being of red and white mottled Champlain marble. The marble 
mosaic floor between the choir stalls is in a geometrical design of three 
large quatrefoils, with borders of oak leaves and acorns ; and across 
the entire front of the choir, at the head of the steps, is a banded 
arabesque design of passion-flowers. At the foot of the sanctuary step 



276 History of St. Paul's Church. 

the mosaic flooring is in a design of Greek crosses in dull red on a 
white ground, with borders of oak leaves and acorns. 

The Sacrarium or Sanctuary, to the east of the choir, is raised 
above it one step, and is separated from it by an altar rail of brown 
Scotch sandstone, supported by eighteen Gothic shafts, arranged in 
six groups of three each ; the rail is surmounted by a coping of Cham- 
plain marble. This altar rail was a part of the gift of the Shelton 
Society in memory of Dr. Shelton. The floor of the sanctuary, also 
of marble mosaic, is a beautiful design of the vine and grapes ; directly 
in front of the altar a quatrefoil is formed with symbols of the four 
Evangelists surrounding a Greek cross. The flooring of the entire 
chancel is of marble mosaic, laid in cement. It was made in Paris, and 
is said to consist of 324,000 tiny colored cubes. It was laid by Burke 
& Company of New York and Chicago. 

The inner roof of the chancel is a cylindrical-pointed vault of 
wood, ceiled with narrow matched boards, paneled in squares, and 
divided into three bays or sections by broad transverse arches of 
masonry with moulded edges, which are carried on corbels and nook- 
shafts, the soffit of the arch being decorated with colored fresco-work. 
The use of arches of masonry to support a vaulted wooden ceiling, — 
of which the chancel roof is an example, — is, although unusual, more 
frequent in mediaeval Gothic work than is generally supposed. 

A broad wall frieze, under the ceiling, surrounds the entire chan- 
cel, decorated with frescoed figures of angels. The chancel is twenty- 
five feet wide and forty-one feet deep ; twelve feet of this depth 
being occupied by the sanctuary at the eastern end, inside of the 
altar rail, and twenty-nine feet by the choir. A door from the north 
side of the choir leads into the vestry room. 

The organ, which is a three-manual instrument made by 
E. & G. G. Hook & Hastings of Boston, is placed in the organ 
chamber immediately to the north of the chancel. It is cased in 
antique oak to match the chancel furniture. There is a swinging choir- 
stall doorway to the organist's seat, which is directly behind the choir 



The Restored St. Paul's. 277 

stalls. The lofty arched openings from the organ chamber into the 
chancel, and into the transept at the end of the north aisle, are filled 
with speaking pipes, handsomely decorated in colors and gold. 

The sanctuary is approached from the choir by one step, and the 
altar is raised three steps above the floor of the sanctuary, all of 
the steps being of mottled Champlain marble. 

The fireproof features of the new edifice are the concrete floor, 
which is laid on brick arches supported by steel beams resting on 
stone piers, and the lathing, which is of corrugated iron. 

The aisles and aisle spaces are floored with end-wood mosaic, made 
in Rochester, N. Y., composed of small blocks of variegated ash, with 
a border of darker wood, set on end, and joined by leaden tongues, 
the wood being highly polished and showing much beauty of grain 
and coloring. 

The wall decorations are by Edward J. N. Stent of New York ; the 
dado is of blocked maroon, with a border of peacock blue and gold, 
above which is the terra-cotta tinted wall. Medallions and sym- 
bolic designs are painted at intervals on the walls, and the full, rich 
colors, with the light from the stained-glass windows, produce a very 
beautiful effect. With the exception of the memorial windows, which 
are described elsewhere, the stained glass of the church was furnished 
by J. & R. Lamb of New York. 

The church is lighted by incandescent electric lights — clusters of 
lights with their pear-shaped globes encircling the capitals of the stone 
pillars ; in the chancel are convoluted clusters of lights on either side, 
resembling bunches of most brilliant fruit. 

The edifice is heated by three hot-air furnaces. The pews and all 
the woodwork of the church are of antique oak. The pew ends are 
slightly pointed, and are moulded on the tops and sides. They are 
handsomely paneled, the design being a pointed arch, in the head of 
which is a large quatrefoil, bearing in the center a small metal plate 
with the number of the pew. Below are two small sub-arches resting 



278 History of St. Paul's Church. 

on semi-detached shafts. The fronts of the pews facing the chancel, 
and in the aisle passages, and also those in "the chapel" facing the 
main church, are panelled in an arcaded repetition of the design used 
for the pew ends. 

In 1876, in January and February, the Sunday School room in the 
basement of the church was renovated and refitted, and an altar and 
platform were built against the north wall. (See page 118.) 

Further alterations and improvements were completed in 1883. 
(See pages 134, 359.) 

This part of the church is sometimes spoken of as the "crypt 
chapel." The altar is now placed against the east wall. The reading- 
desk, of carved black walnut, and the heavy walnut seats at either side 
formed at one time part of the chancel furniture of the church. They 
were in the " crypt chapel " at the time of the fire, and were not de- 
stroyed, and thus form a link between the old church and the present one. 
The altar rail in this chapel is similar to that in the old church. After 
the fire, enough of the original altar rail of the church was found to 
make one small section ; the remainder of the rail is modern and was 
made similar to the section saved. The spiral uprights of gilded 
metal supporting the rail were nearly all taken from the old chancel 
after the fire ; most of them were damaged and had to be restored in 
part, and one or two of them are new, and made to match the others. 
Near the altar rail is a black walnut font, placed there in 1884 in 
memory of Mrs. Shelton ; this also passed through the fire unharmed. 

(See Memorials, page 296.) 



Ube /IDemorials. 

The chancel, with its altar, reredos and windows, is designed as a 
memorial of the Rev. Dr. William Shelton, and of his long and faith- 
ful ministry in St. Paul's. (See page 183.) 



■a o 



3 5; 

=■ T. 




The Memorials. 279 

The altar and the reredos were the gift to the church, in 1889, 
of Mrs. Agnes Ethel Tracy, widow of Francis W. Tracy who died 
April 15, 1886. They were designed by Robert W. Gibson, the archi- 
tect. (See page 395.) 

The Altar is of Mexican onyx from the quarry of La Sorpresa, the 
quality of the onyx used being of unusual beauty. The work was 
executed in Buffalo by Lautz & Company. The front is an arcaded 
design of seven trefoil arches, supported on circular semi-detached 
shafts, with carved capitals ; very little other carving is employed, the 
beauty of the whole being due to the exquisite finish and delicate 
coloring and markings of the material used, and the severely simple 
lines. The retable, formed of plain slabs of onyx and extending 
across the altar, is fifteen inches high and nine and one-half Inches 
deep, with a back-piece twelve inches high. Above the center of the 
retable is a second step, — or gradation, — also of onyx, fifteen inches 
high, and two feet nine inches long, with a deep moulded edge. This 
forms the platform upon which stands the altar cross. 

The Altar Cross is of elaborately-wrought polished brass. In the 
center is a quartrefoil containing a bas-relief representation of the 
Agnus Dei, and upon each of the arms are similar quartrefoils, bear- 
ing symbols of the Four Evangelists. Three of these quartrefoils 
form the terminations of the three upper arms of the cross. The fourth, 
upon the lower arm, is placed slightly farther away from the center 
than the others, and the arm itself extends beyond the quartrefoil and 
rises from a moulded pedestal of brass. Upon each arm is the word 
" Holy." The whole is supported as a " Calvary Cross " upon three 
bra.ss steps, typifying Faith, Hope and Charity. The brass base, seven 
inches deep, below these steps was added after the fire to raise the 
cross sufficiently to correspond with the present reredos. The entire 
height, including the steps and extra base, is five feet six inches. The 
cross was made in England and was placed on the altar of the church 
about the year 1878. It was the gift of Mrs. Gertrude Squire Talcott 
and Miss Tillinghast, now Mrs. Peter P. Burtis. This cross was on 



28o History of St. Paul's Church. 

the altar at the time the church was burned, in 1888. It was melted 
from its base by the heat, and fell between the ruined altar and the 
stone wall, thus being preserved from entire destruction. When 
found, after the ruins had cooled, it was carried to the Guild House, 
and later was renovated and restored to its present condition by Miss 
Agnes Squier. 

The Reredos is of brown Scotch sandstone, and extends the full 
width across the end of the chancel, against the wall under the large 
east window. 

The upper part is divided into three sections in arcaded design. 
In the center rises a pediment, under which is a broad panel filled with 
finely-executed glass mosaic work in colors on a gold ground, repre- 
senting angels in adoration on either side of the cross, which appears 
in a burst of glory. 

The trefoil arch-heads above the figures, and the three quatrefoils 
immediately under the pediment, are filled with mosaic in convention- 
alized lily patterns. The narrow mosaic panels on either side of this 
center panel represent a vine, and the trefoil tops are filled with 
designs of the lily. The two side sections of the reredos are similar 
in design, and are each divided into a broad center panel with two 
narrow side panels ; in the center of each are angel figures adoring, 
and on either side are designs of pomegranates, emblems of immor- 
tality ; immediately above is a narrow frieze of lilies running 
across the three panels ; the trefoil points above the frieze are 
filled with flower forms. At the bottom of all the panels, across the 
entire width of the reredos, runs a narrow band of arabesque 
design. 

The different panels of the reredos are separated from each other 
by slender, semi-detached shafts with carved capitals, supporting nar- 
row, pointed trefoil-headed, arches, all carved of the sandstone. These 
narrow trefoil arches extend across the entire upper part of the rere- 
dos, terminating in carved pendants where the shafts are omitted to 
form the broader panels. The panel under the center pediment is 



Tlie Memorials. 281 

slightly recessed, the siender stone shafts on each side are coupled, 
and the open stone work above, under the pediment, is especially 
elaborate, a pointed cinquefoil arch with fleur-de-lis cuspings being 
superimposed upon a tracery of three quatrefoils, while below these 
are three narrow, pointed trefoil arches. A broad panel for the 
mosaic work underneath is formed by omitting in the design the two nar- 
row center shafts of stone and putting carved pendants in their places, 
thus throwing the three narrow panels into one broad panel. In the two 
side sections of the reredos, broad panels for the mosaic are formed 
by throwing two of the narrow panels into one, in a similar 
manner. 

The center pediment is surmounted by a finial, and up each side of 
the pediment are square-leaf crockets carved in stone. These are con- 
tinued horizontally as a cresting along the top of the cornice of the 
entire reredos. 

At each end of the reredos, and separating the middle and side sec- 
tions, are buttresses of stone work, with gabled heads, surmounted by 
tall crocketed pinnacles elaborately carved. The faces of these but- 
tresses have narrow sunken panels with trefoil heads springing from 
long slender shafts. 

Immediately under the arcade work and mosaic panels of the rere- 
dos, and separated by a moulded string-course of stone (which inter- 
sects with the onyx shelf upon which the brass altar cross stands), is a 
plain band of stone work running across the reredos, on each side 
of the altar, opposite to the second step of the retable, bearing the 
carved inscription : 

"©lorg be to lEbee © Xorft flRost Ibfgb," 

in old English letters, inlaid in gold ; below this text, and joining 
the retable on either side of the altar, is a banded design of pointed 
trefoils, seven on each side, carved in low relief in the stone, repre- 
senting vines, flower and leaf forms. Below this, on the south side of 



282 History of St. Paul's Church. 

the altar, is the inscription, cut in the stone of the reredos, and inlaid 
in gold: 

"REV. WM. SHELTON, D. D. 

Born September hth, 1798. 

Ordered Deacon, 1823. 

Ordained Priest, 1826. 

Rector of this Church from 1829. 

Died October ir, 1883. 

May Light perpetual shine upon him. Amen." 



And opposite, to the north of the altar, is the inscription : 

"To the Glory of God, and in Memory of 

Rev. William Shelton, D. D., 

And of his life-long friendship to the family of 

MY husband, Francis W. Tracy, 

This Altar is erected by Agnes E. Tracy." 



At the bottom of the reredos, on either side of the altar, is a deep 
moulded base. 

The glass mosaic work of the reredos was executed abroad, and 
was furnished and put in place by Burke & Company of New York 
and Chicago, and the stone work was furnished by W. D. CoUingwood 
of Buffalo. 

The entire mosaic work of the reredos is of great beauty and high 
artistic merit, the faces of the kneeling angel figures being especially 
fine. The work is all in delicate colors on a dull gold ground, and, 
being made of tiny cubes of glass fitted together, has a peculiar lumi- 
nous appearance, which is rendered more striking and beautiful by the 
dull brown of the stone work surrounding and framing it. 

The large East Window, which in the old church was a lancet- 
triplet, is now in the enlarged chancel a single, broad, pointed-arched 
opening with geometric stone tracery. The stained glass in this win- 
dow, which is also a memorial to the Reverend Dr. Shelton, was 



The Memorials. 283 

designed and made by Holliday & Company of London, and cost about 
$3,000. The glass is rich in color and the design is elaborate and beau- 
tiful and well suited to the intricate stone work of the tracery. The 
upper part of the stone tracery forms four quatrefoils enclosed in a 
circle, with stained glass in symbols of the Four Evangelists ; and 
angel faces and figures interwoven with flower forms fill in the smaller 
spaces of the stone work. Below this, the window is divided by the 
tracery, into five long, pointed-arched panels, the design representing 
the Ascension, the figure of Our Lord being in the center panel. This 
panel is taller than the side panels and has a cinquefoil head, in which is 
the descending Dove, and the text from St. John, xvi., 7 : " If I go not 
away, the Comforter will not come unto you." In the upper part of the 
side panels are the adoring figures of angels, and the trefoil heads of 
these panels are filled with flower forms. In the two quatrefoils of the 
tracery, immediately above the side panels, are angel figures. Below, 
grouped across the base of the entire window, and filling the lower 
part of the five panels, are the figures of the Blessed Virgin and the 
Eleven Apostles in attitudes of wonder and adoration. The repre- 
sentation of the Virgin Mother, which is especially lovely, is in the 
center one of the lower five panels, immediately below the figure of 
Our Lord. It is almost hidden by the pediment of the reredos. The 
robes are in rich, subdued tones, and the coloring of the entire window 
is most beautiful and harmonious. 

Worked into the design across the window are the words, from 
Acts i., 9 : 

"While they beheld, He was taken up and a cloud received Him out of their 
sight." 

On the slanting sill of the window, immediately below the glass, 
are two brass tablets, one on either side of the pediment of the reredos. 
They are inscribed as follows : 

4a In Memory of ij. •!• This window is ifr 

Rev. William Shelton, D. D. erected by loving friends. 



, 284 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Owing partly to their slanting position and partly to the glow of 
light from the window, these tablets, although in plain sight, would 
hardly be noticed from the floor of the chancel or church. 

This window replaces the original Shelton Memorial East Window, 
which, in the old church, was a lancet-triplet, a tall center lancet 
between two smaller ones, and which was paid for by the voluntary 
contributions of the many friends of Dr. Shelton, and put in place 
in 1887, being unveiled at Easter in that year. The window is 
described on page 156, and is shown in one of the illustrations in 
this volume. 

This original window was destroyed with the church in the fire of 
1888, and the present window was paid for with the insurance money 
received. 

The Chancel Furniture is all of antique oak, and designed by the 
architect, Mr. Gibson. The rows of stalls on either side of the chancel, 
against the north and south walls, have elaborately carved canopies, 
or tabernacles, the fronts of which are pointed cinquefoil arches, 
flanked by pendants, with finely carved lofty pinnacles above ; the can- 
opies are supported by slender Gothic shafts, and the backs of the 
stalls are filled with fluted panel-work, in a design giving the idea of an 
open book. The woodwork which frames these panels forms a double 
row of plain crosses ; the upper row, under the canopies, are Greek, 
and the lower row are of the Latin form. In front of the stalls, on 
either side, are the seats and prayer-desks for the vested choir, which 
are finished with handsomely paneled, high-pointed ends, terminating 
in carved poppy-heads. The fronts of the prayer-desks facing the 
aisle of the chancel are made in an arcaded design of open-work 
trefoil arches, resting on small Gothic shafts. The seats face each 
other on either side of the aisle of the chancel, and rise slightly towards 
the walls 

The Sedilia, or seats, in the sanctuary are of similar design, 
with paneled and high-pointed ends, terminating in carved poppy- 
heads. 



The Memorials. 285 

The Bishop's Chair is similar to the stalls, but more elaborate in 
design, the gabled canopy being supported upon slender, clustered 
shafts at each of the four corners, and having single shafts between 
these upon each side. At each corner of the canopy are slender pin- 
nacles, and the front and side gables are ornamented with crockets and 
finials. In front of the chair and connected with it is a prayer-desk, 
handsomely carved, the front being in an arcaded design of trefoil 
arches. The chair is placed against the wall upon the south side of 
the choir portion of the chancel, between the stalls and the altar rail. 
This position — while perhaps according to usage in the great choirs 
of some of the English cathedrals, in which the congregation occupy 
seats during the service — is a somewhat secluded one here in St. Paul's, 
where the conditions are different. In the church before the fire the 
bishop's chair was placed against the north side of the chancel arch, and 
faced the nave diagonally. (See illustrations opposite pages 154, 156.) 

The Credence Table is of brown Scotch sandstone beautifully 
carved, and stands against the south wall of the sanctuary. The 
gabled canopy is crocketed and topped with a finial, and flanked on 
either side with crocketed pinnacles, and the line of the coping termi- 
nates in foliated carvings. The cinquefoil arch under the gable is en- 
riched with foliated cusps, and springs from small circular shafts. Half- 
way down, in the niche, a plain stone shelf is placed. The bottom of 
the niche is moulded and projects in a half-circle, and the rounded, 
bowl-shaped surface below is richly carved in relief with representa- 
tions of the symbolic wheat and grapes. This rests upon a cluster of 
three small, semi-detached shafts, and angle-shafts ornament the lower 
corners of the table on either side. Although the rounded portion is 
not hollowed out as a basin, but is used as a simple shelf for the 
temporary reception of the sacramental vessels, the credence table is 
otherwise of the same general design as the ancient piscina or water- 
drains, which, in the mediaeval churches, were used by the priests for 
the rinsing of the sacred vessels, the bowl being drilled at the bottom 
and a small channel or drain for the water formed through the stone- 



286 History of St. Paul's Church. 

work of the wall to the outside of the church. The credence table 
was the gift to the church of Mrs. Josephine B. Dickson, and was de- 
signed by the architect, Mr. Gibson. 

The Pulpit is of brown Scotch sandstone ; it is placed in the nave, 
immediately in front of the south wall of the chancel, from which it is 
reached by a winding flight of four stone steps. 

The upper portion is a slightly elongated octagon in shape, the longer 
side being placed towards the nave ; three sides of the octagon, at the 
back of the pulpit, are omitted — one at the junction with the wall of 
the church, and two to form the entrance from the chancel. It springs, 
by a series of corbel mouldings, from a stem formed of clustered 
shafts, semi-detached, with richly-carved capitals and moulded bases, 
and alternating large and small around an octagonal center-block. 
The clustered shafts rest upon a stone plinth. The five sides of the 
upper portion of the pulpit are beautifully ornamented with cinquefoil- 
headed panels, ogee-pointed, and deeply carved in the stone, and 
moulded. The spandrels above the cinquefoils are filled with finely- 
carved flower, fruit and leaf forms. The front, or center panel of the 
five, is slightly broader than the others, and is more elaborately orna- 
mented, two narrow trefoil-headed panels ending in finials being intro- 
duced on either side of the cinquefoil panel. All of the panel work 
is very deeply recessed. At the outer angles of the octagon are semi- 
detached circular shafts with carved capitals in floriated forms, and 
with moulded bases. The hollow cornice moulding under the broad 
stone coping of the pulpit is enriched by leaf carvings placed at inter- 
vals. The flower and fruit carvings of the pulpit are treated in the 
naturalistic manner, characteristic of the Decorated period of Gothic, 
and the entire work is very admirably executed, from the designs of 
Mr. Gibson. 

Around the pulpit, carved in relief upon the beveled top of the base 
moulding under the panels, is the inscription : 

"IFn Xovlng /IftetnorB of IRev. 'MflUam Sbelton, 2). 2)., 
+ a. D., 1889." + 



The Memorials. 287 

At the front of the pulpit, just above the floor, on the plinth, is 
carved : 

" Erected by the Shelton Society.'' 



The pulpit, together with the brass sermon-rest thereon, and also 
the altar rail, which is of Scotch sandstone, capped with Champlain 
marble, and corresponds in design with the pulpit, were the gift of 
the "Shelton Society," — an organization of the younger women of 
the parish. 

The Eagle Lectern, of polished antique brass, is seven feet high, 
and stands in front of the chancel, on the north side, on a base six 
inches high, of the red and white Champlain marble, — this base being 
an extension of the first of the three steps leading from the floor of 
the church into the chancel. The reader stands upon a platform, also 
of the Champlain marble, two steps above the level of the chancel floor, 
and five steps above the floor of the nave. 

The moulded metal base of the lectern is cruciform. From the 
center of the cross a large central shaft rises, octagonal in shape and 
richly moulded and paneled. From each of the four arms of the cruci- 
form base, — which are ornamented with floriated scrolls, — moulded 
octagonal buttresses rise, surmounted by crocketed finials. Connecting 
the buttresses with the central shaft are four medallion panels, 
each in the form of a floriated square, bearing symbols of the Four 
Evangelists. Above these panels — like flying buttresses — ornamental 
scroll-work connects the four buttresses with the central shaft. Surround- 
ing the central shaft, above the scroll-work, is an arcade of eight tre- 
foiled niches, the arches resting on moulded shafts. Above this is a 
band of quatrefoils, surmounted by the foliated, octagonal cap, bear- 
ing a crown formed of an interlacing design of crosses and fleurs-de- 
lis, in which rests the large globe representing the world. Upon this 
the eagle stands, with outstretched wings and uplifted head, as if ready 
for flight. 



288 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Encircling the globe is the inscription : 

"•{• Ii< Memoriam Hf 

CHARLES WORTHINGTON EVANS, 

Born, March 13, 1812, 

Died, February 8, 1889. 

For twenty five years one of the Wardens of this Parish." 

The lectern was designed and made by J. & R. Lamb, of New 
York City, and is a memorial to the late Charles W. Evans, the gift to the 
church of his wife and daughters. (See pages 172, 181.) .... "The 
eagle, because of its lofty heavenward flight, is the symbol of inspira- 
tion, and its position upon the globe and its outspread wings remind 
us how the Word of God is to be carried into all the world." .... 

The Font, of brown Scotch sandstone, is a quatrefoil bowl, resting 
upon a square, which is surrounded by eight circular stone shafts, with 
carved capitals and moulded bases. Each face of the square bears a 
sunken quatrefoil panel. The whole stands upon an octagonal base, 
and was designed by the architect, Mr. Gibson. 

It is the gift to the church of William D. Collingwood, and 
stands in the baptistery, being approached by two stone steps placed 
at the back. (See pages 274, 394.) 

The inscription, carved in raised letters on the stone, is near the 
top of the bowl : " In the name of the Father and of the Son and of 
the Holy Ghost. Amen." The bowl has a heavy brass-mounted oaken 
cover, quatrefoil in shape. 

The Ewer is of polished, engraved brass, and is inscribed : 

"The gift of those baptized in St. Paul's Church." Below are the 
words : " Water to the mystical washing away of sin." 

The Litany Desk, at the head of the main aisle, is of antique oak, 
elaborately and beautifully carved ; the pointed end pieces have finials 
and doubled crockets. At each corner of the desk, on the chancel 
side, is the carved figure of an angel, eighteen inches high, standing 
under a Gothic canopy, and between the two figures is an open arcade 



The Memorials. 289 

of narrow, pointed trefoils resting on slender shafts. The desk was 
the gift to the church of Charles A. Gould, at the time of the restor- 
ation (see page 181.) . . . . "The solemn service of the Litany has 
been said from very early times from the Litany-desk, placed at the 

head of the nave, before the entrance to the chancel ' Let the 

priests, the ministers of the Lord, weep between the porch and the 
altar, and let them say, Spare Thy people, O Lord.' Joel ii., 17. 
Our Litany, retaining the same words of supplication, is said, in allu- 
sion to this, in the midst of the church." . . . 

On the desk is a book of the Litany, bound in full red turkey 
morocco, with a plain brass cross on the front cover, and " St. Paul's 
Church " in gold letters. On the reverse is the inscription : " Thank 
Offering, Easter, 1890." 

The Communion Service of the church consists of a large silver 
flagon, a large and a small paten, and two chalices. To these have 
been added lately two cruets of glass and silver. 

The older pieces are of heavy silver, of graceful design, and, with 
the exception of narrow ornamental borders, the surfaces are plain and 
polished, the inside of the vessels showing the tool marks of the workers. 
The lid of the flagon is topped with an acorn. Upon the flagon and 
upon the smaller paten the following inscription is engraved : 

" PRESENTED BY 

THE EPISCOPAL FEMALE SOCIETY 

TO 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, 
Buffalo, N. Y., 
1825." 

Upon each of the two chalices is engraved : 

" Presented to St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, 
by the Female Episcopal Society, 1826." 

The larger paten is similar in design to the smaller one, but bears no 
inscription. It was doubtless purchased later, as it became needed in 
the growth of the parish. 



290 History of St. Paul's Church, 

The society mentioned in the inscriptions may have been a local 
organization, or, perhaps, a New York or a Philadelphia society, formed 
for the purpose of supplying necessary articles to young and struggling 
churches, as St. Paul's was in 1825 and 1826. In spite of much inves- 
tigation, no record has, however, been found of the society. 

The two cruets are alike in design, and are of glass mounted in 
silver, the covers each bearing a small Greek cross. On one is 

inscribed : 

' St. Paul's Church. 
Presented by the Sunday School, 
Easter, 1891." 
Upon the other cruet is engraved : 

"St. Paul's Church. 

Presented by the Ladies, 

Easter, 1891.'' 

The Communion Service escaped the fire of 1888, being at the time 
in the safe at the Guild House. 

The Processional Cross is the gift of Dr. and Mrs. Matthew D. 
Mann, in memory of their daughter Helen. It is of richly-wrought 
polished brass, and is a Latin cross with quartrefoiled ends, bearing 
symbols of the Four Evangelists ; in the center is a representation of 
the Agnus Dei. The cross is mounted on an oaken staff, and when not 
in use rests in brass sockets placed to receive it, upon the east end of 
one of the choir desks. It was first used at Easter, 1890, as was also 
a memorial altar cloth, presented by Miss Stevenson. 

The inscription reads : 

" •{• To the Glory of God and in Loving Memory of Helen Mann, 
Sep't 12, 1870, 4* Sep't 3, 1887 4"" 

Altar Vases. — On either side of the cross, on the altar, are large 
brass vases, which were presented to the church by the women of what 
was formerly called the " ecclesiastical committee." 

The brass Book-Rest for the altar is ornamented with pierced work 
and an engraved panel representing the pelican and her young — a 



The Memorials. 291 

symbol of the Atonement. It was presented by Mrs. John W. Brown, 
wife of the former rector of the church, as a thank offering for recov- 
ery from a severe illness. The inscription is : " In the Name of the 
Father; the Son and the Holy Ghost. Amen." " St. Paul's Cathe- 
dral Church." On the under side is inscribed : "A Thank Offering, 
A. D. 1888. A. G. B." 

The Alms Basin is a memorial of the late Mrs. John Pease, who 
died October 22, 1873. It was the gift to the church of the teachers 
and scholars of the Sunday School, and is of polished brass, beauti- 
fully engraved. The text, "Blessed is the man that provideth for 
the sick and needy," encircles an engraved, conventionalized figure of 
St. Paul. Farther down is the inscription : " In Memoriam. Sarah 
Eliza Pease, A. D. 1874." The alms basin was saved in the fire of 
1888, being in the vestry room when the fire broke out. The fire- 
men had been able to beat back the flames from the vestry room, so 
that later it was possible for some of the choir boys to enter the 
room by the window and save several articles. Some of Dr. Brown's 
vestments were saved in this way, and the alms basin also was carried 
out through the window and taken to the Guild House, blackened by 
the smoke and gas, but otherwise uninjured. 

The Chancel Books. — The set of seven books for the chancel, con- 
sisting of the altar service, prayer books and hymnals, was given 
by Charles Robert Wilson, in memory of the late Robert Preston 
Wilson. They are bound in full scarlet turkey morocco, with plain 
brass crosses on the front covers, and lettered : " St. Paul's Church." 
On the reverse of each volume is the inscription : " In Memoriam, 
Robert Preston Wilson, A. D. 1892." 

The gift also includes an oaken chest for the vestry room in which 
the books may be properly preserved. 

In April, 1896, a baptismal shell and eucharistic spoon were pre- 
sented to the church by the choir boys, as a memorial to Harold J. 
McKenna, formerly a member of the choir. 

In 1898, Mrs. James Sweeney made a most appropriate memorial 
gift to the parish. In loving memory of her daughter, Kate S. 



292 History of St. Paul's Church. 

narrower, wife of H. C. Harrower, who died in October, 1895, she 
presented for use in the Communion of the Sick, a complete and 
beautiful set of silver communion vessels, with altar cross, cruets, and 
all else needed for a reverent celebration of the Blessed Sacrament. 

Among the memorials in the church must also be recorded the 

gifts to the Shelton Memorial Endowment Fund, now incorporated in 

the "Permanent Endowment Fund." (See pages 244, 245) : 

June I, 1897, The George E. Hayes Memorial Gift $r, 000.00 

November 5, 1897, The Charlotte Kimberly Memorial Gift 1,000.00 

December 30, 1897, The Jane Wey Grosvenor Memorial Gift, .... 1,000.00 

1898, Bequest of Miss Elizabeth Bull 475 -OO 

1899, Bequest of Hon. James M. Smith 3,000.00 

1899, Special Gift 100.00 

1899, Additional for the "George E. Hayes Memorial," i.ooo.co 

1900, Bequest of Mrs. Agnes L. Warren, . 3,000.00 

1902, Bequest of Dr. Thomas Lothrop 5,000.00 

1902, The Frank W. Abbott Memorial Gift 100.00 

On the south wall of the south transept, in a gabled niche built 
for the purpose, stands the marble bust of Sheldon Thompson, one 
of the founders of the parish, presented by his son, A. Porter Thomp- 
son, and his daughters, Mrs. Warren and Mrs. Viele, in 1890, to replace 
the one destroyed in the fire of 1888, and which had been placed in 
the church in the year 1852. The inscription, on a marble tablet 

below the bust, is : 

" In Memory of 

SHELDON THOMPSON, 

July 2, 1785 4* March 13, 1851. 

One of the Founders of the Parish 

AND A MEMBER OF THE FIRST VeSTRY. 



CATHARINE THOMPSON, 
His Wife, 
August 31, 1793 J^ May 8, 1832." 

The bust is a finely-executed portrait in white marble, and was 
made in Italy. (See pages 64, 188.) 



The Memorials. 293 

On the north wall of " the chapel " are two brass tablets, inscribed 
as follows : 

"JAMES DANIELS SHEPPARD. 
Born in Frome, England, January 16, A. D., 1793. 

Died in Buffalo, October 24, A. D. , 1881. 

He was Organist of this Church for more than 

Twenty Years. He bequeathed by his last Will and 

Testament to the Vestry of this Church, the sum of 

One Thousand Dollars, to be held in trust, the interest 

to be paid between St. Thomas's Day and Christmas Day 

IN each year, to not less than ten indigent 

PERSONS OF this PARISH. 

'Blessed is the man that provideth for the sick and needy.'" 

(See pages 154, 321, 324, 325.) 



The second of the two tablets is inscribed : 

"Sacred to the Memory of 

GEORGE TRUSCOTT, 

Captain Royal Navy, 

Died July 2, 1851, aged 66 years, 

AND 

MARY, his Wife, who died at Toronto, 
July 16, 1837, aged 37 years." 



Also to their children : 

WILLIAM EDWARD, Died October 29, 1838, aged 10 years. 

FRANCES CHARLOTTE, wife of W. H. Martin, U. S. A., 

Died October 24, 1841, aged 22 years. 

ELIZA, died October 9, 1853, aged 18 years. 



Their remains were removed to Forest Lawn Cemetery. 



Also to GEORGE, died March 4, 1884, aged 58 years. 
Eldest son of George and Mary Truscott.'' 



294 History of St. Paul's Church. 

In the east wall of the south transept of the church, and near the 
pulpit, is the Stevenson memorial window, made by Louis C. Tiffany of 
New York, and very beautiful in drawing and coloring, representing a 
procession of twelve angelic musicians and choristers. It replaces the 
similar one destroyed in the fire of May lo, 1888, and was placed here 
in memory of the wife of the late Edward L. Stevenson. The inscrip- 
tion is : " In Memoriam, Amelia S. Stevenson." Mrs. Stevenson died 
August 31, 1886. The original window was given in 1887, and the 
present window at the time of the restoration of the church after the 
fire. 

The next memorial window is in the south wall of the south tran- 
sept, the second window from the east. It was placed here in Novem- 
ber, 1 89 1, in memory of the late Dr. George E. Hayes, and was made 
by John Hardman & Co. of London. The principal portion of the 
design portrays the Transfiguration and represents Our Lord in rai- 
ment "white and glistering," with Moses and Elias on either side. 
Below, in the foreground, are Peter, James and John. Above, in a 
smaller panel, are the three Israelites in the fiery furnace, with the 
fourth Person, whose form is described in Daniel iii., 25, as " like the 
Son of God." The inscription at the bottom of the window reads : 

"GEORGE EDWARD HAYES, 

Born November 7, 1804, 

Died April 27, 1882." 

To the right of this is the window in memory of the late General 
Scroggs. It represents the warlike figure of Joshua and the carrying 
of the Ark of the Lord around the City of Jericho, and replaces a 
similar one destroyed in the fire. It was placed in the church in 1889, 
during the restoration. The inscription is : 

" In Memoriam, 
General GUSTAVUS A. SCROGGS." 

General Scroggs died January 24, 1887, aged 66 years. 



The Memorials. 295 

Both windows were made by Hardman & Co. G. M. Booth of 
Buffalo, who put the glass in place, had finished the setting of the 
original window only one hour before the fire broke out which destroyed 
it with the church. 

The next window to the right, was given in 1893 by Mrs. James 
Sweeney, in memory of her father and mother. The inscription is : 
" In loving memory of John Scott Ganson and his wife Sophronia 
Ballard," lettered on a scroll, borne by two angel figures. 

Mr. Ganson died August 30, 1875 ; Mrs. Ganson died September 
23, 1881. 

The window is the work of Mayer & Company of Munich. 
Above is a panel representing the raising from the dead, by Elijah, of 
the widow's son, and below the design shows the raising of the 
daughter of Jairus, the promise of the Resurrection as shadowed 
forth in the Old Testament and in the New. At the top of the win- 
dow an angel figure holds a scroll, with the words " Holy, Holy, Holy." 

The large window in the north wall of the addition to the main 
edifice, called "The Chapel," is a memorial to Mrs. Lucretia Stan- 
ley Shelton, the universally beloved wife of Dr. Shelton. This 
window was placed in the church in October, i88g, in part by Mrs. 
Seth H. Grosvenor (a niece of Mrs. Shelton) and her children, and in 
part by the use of the bequest made by Dr. Shelton for a memorial 
in St. Paul's to his wife. (See pages 149, 150.) The executors of Dr. 
Shelton's will originally intended, before the burning of the church, to 
pay the amount of this bequest towards the proposed new altar, but 
the fire caused them to change their plans in this respect, and it was 
decided to join with Mrs. Grosvenor and her children in this most 
appropriate memorial. The window was executed by John Hardman 
& Co. of London, England, and in conception, drawing, and color- 
ing is very beautiful. " The artist has seized upon that most pathetic 
incident in the life of St. Paul, when, by the seashore at Miletus, he is 
bidding the Elders of Ephesus farewell, at which time we read : ' They 
all wept sore, and fell on Paul's neck, and kissed him, sorrowing most 



2g6 History of St. Paul's Church. 

of all for the words which he spake, that they should see his face no 
more. And they accompanied him unto the ship.' This scene is 
described in the twentieth chapter of the Acts, from the seventeeth 
verse to the end." .... The inscription reads : 

" To THE Glory of God, and in Loving Memory of 

LUCRETIA STANLEY SHELTON, 

Born July 21, 1798, 

Died September 6, i88s." 

A large room in the basement of the church is fitted up as a chapel, 
sometimes called the " Crypt Chapel," and is used for the sessions of 
the Sunday School. A small altar is placed here, a lectern, seats, etc. 

In the crypt chapel is a memorial font of carved black walnut, 
with a brass-mounted cover. On the hexagonal base is the inscription : 

In Memory of 

LUCRETIA STANLEY SHELTON, 

A. D. 1884. 

From the base rises a stem of clustered shafts with carved brack- 
ets supporting the six-sided upper part of the font, which has quartre- 
foil panels inlaid in each side. Above, around the margin of the 
moulded top which frames the bowl, are carved the words : " One 
Lord — one Faith — one Baptism." This memorial was the gift to the 
church of Miss Elizabeth A. McKee, Easter, 1884. 

It was in the crypt during the fire of 1888, and is one of the few 
memorials not destroyed at that time. 

On the altar in the crypt chapel is a brass altar cross, on the back 
of which are engraved simply the words, " In Memoriam." It was 
given at Easter, 1872, by Mrs. Charlotte A. Brace, widow of Curtis L. 
Brace, in memory of her only son, Frederick Gelston Brace, who died 
February 12, 1872, in his twenty-first year. He was, at the time of his 
death, treasurer of the Sunday School, and was a grandson of Lester 
Brace, for many years a warden and vestryman of St. Paul's. The 
cross was in this chapel at the time of the fire. 



The Memorials. 297 

The Bible on the lectern also passed through the fire of 1888, and 
was much damaged by water. The inscription on the cover is, " Pre- 
sented by Henry C. and Sarah L. Squier to St. Paul's Chapel." It 
was given about the year 1876. 

A memorial in this part of the church edifice is that to the two sons 
of the late Horatio and Elizabeth Staats Seymour, which memorial 
consists of the first two windows on the Erie Street side of the base- 
ment, with a brass tablet between. On the tablet is the following 
inscription : 

"In pursuance of the will of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Staats Seymour, 

THEIR mother, THESE WINDOWS 

have been placed 

In Memory of 

Horatio Schuyler Seymour 

AND 

Barent Staats Seymour, 
A. D., 1884." 

The amount left to the church in Mrs. Seymour's will was $500, 
part of which was used by the vestry towards enlarging and refitting 
the Sunday School room. (See page 133.) 

These windows were not injured in the fire of 1888. 

Immediately to the right of the Seymour memorial windows is a 
window filled with old-fashioned stained glass, the design being a 
cross in a red medallion above, and in a foiled, oblong panel below 
is the inscription : " Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings Thou 
hast perfected praise." This is a part of the stained glass which was 
formerly set in the window next to the pulpit, now occupied by the 
Stevenson memorial, where it was originally placed soon after the 
building of the stone church, having been purchased with money con- 
tributed for the purpose by the children of the Sunday School. The 
original window was over twice the length of the fragment now pre- 
served here, and is shown entire, near the pulpit, in the photograph 



298 History of St. Pauls Church. 

of the interior of the church taken in 1884, reproduced in this 
volume. It was removed about 1887 to make way for the first Steven- 
son memorial window, and the glass was reset and used to fill two of 
the windows in the basement Sunday School room. One of these two 
windows was destroyed by the fire of 1888, but the other was un- 
harmed. 

Those who knew and loved the old church missed, after the fire, 
the beautiful mantling ivy which, before, had almost completely covered 
its walls, and which formed the home of great numbers of English 
sparrows. This ivy was originally brought by Dr. Shelton from West- 
minster Abbey, on his return from his second visit to England in 1865. 
These vines were killed by the fire of 1888, and the sparrows have 
disappeared. Ivy plants (Ampelopsis Veitchii) were set out in the 
spring of 1894, at short distances, all around the edifice. The plants 
were the gift of Philip S. Smith and Charles R. Wilson. The ivy grows 
very rapidly, and the passing of only a few years has been necessary 
to cover again the stone walls with a fresh green veil. 

The progenitors of the sparrows in the old ivy vines were sent from 
England to Dr. Shelton on his return from his visit there in 1865, and 
were watched over by him with the greatest care and pleasure, as he 
walked from his home in the rectory on Pearl Street and around the 
enclosure of the church he loved so well, often stopping to feed the 
birds with his own hand. Their twitterings around the old east window, 
during service time, softened a little by the distance and the thickness 
of the stone walls, always suggested the words from the Psalter : 

"Yea, the sparrow hath found her an house, and the swallow a nest, where she 
may lay her young ; even Thy altars, O Lord of Hosts, my King and ray God." 

For some unknown reason the doves, too, are gone, which circled so 
gracefully about the pinnacles of the old church. They made their 
homes year after year in the belfry and in the unused clock-niches of 
the great tower — niches where they reigned supreme, for the turning 




THE RESTORED ST. PAUL'S. 
From northwest corner Pearl and Church streets. 



Photograph by G. H. n., April, iSc^S- 



The Chimes of St. Paul's. 299 

wheels and pointing hands, measuring the procession of the hours, 
never came to dispossess them. 

The elm which had stood for sixty years inside the church fence, at 
the corner of Pearl and Erie streets — long leafless — was cut down 
August 12, 1902. The last of the other shade trees, which in old days 
surrounded the church, were destroyed by the fire. 



Xlbe Cbimes of St. Paul's. 

"Where ring old bells eternally, 
For prayer incessant made." 

The Chime Fund Association was formed by a number of the 
younger members of the parish, in the year 1850, for the purpose of 
raising subscriptions for the bells to be placed in the tower of the new 
church edifice. 

According to the original book of the minutes of the meetings of this 
association, the first meeting for consultation was held in September, 
1850 ; there were present Charles W. Evans, George C. Webster, DeWitt 
C.Weed and William H.Walker. The next week a more general meeting 
was called for the election of officers, and Mr. Walker presented a form of 
constitution, which was adopted. The officers chosen were : President, 
Edward S. Warren ; first vice-president, Amos I. Mathews ; second 
vice-president, William B. Rochester ; secretary and treasurer, William 
H. Walker. Any person might become a member of the association on 
payment of $5, and signing an agreement to pay the sum of $s semi- 
annually thereafter, until the necessary amount should be raised. 

On October 20, 1853, the treasurer reported a balance to the credit 
of the fund of $1,056.76, from dues, subscriptions and various sources ; 
and Mr. Walker having resigned as treasurer, Charles W. Evans was 
chosen in his place. In February, 1854, the treasurer reports 
$1,223.43, and on June 25, 1856, he reports $2,184.20; also that the 
" young ladies of the parish have within the past month formed a 
young ladies' society to aid the Chime Fund, and propose holding a fair 



300 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



next December for that purpose. It is expected that the tower will be 
ready to receive the chime of bells by next October, and it is recom- 
mended that measures be taken to contract for the chime at an early 
day." A committee was accordingly formed for that purpose. 

On August 27, 1856, the committee reported a proposition from A. 
Meneely's Sons, of the West Troy Bell Foundry, to furnish nine bells, 
as per schedule of weights, " together with a suitable oak frame and 
' rotating yokes ' and all other fixtures requisite for ringing said bells 
either by one person or by eight." They were to be allowed a margin 
of 150 pounds either above or below the aggregate given in schedule, 
for deviation in weight in casting. The nine bells were to be placed 
in position for the sum of $3,800. The committee was authorized to 
accept the proposition, and to contract for the nine bells with the 
Messrs. Meneely, which was done. 

It was resolved to solicit subscriptions from the congregation 
towards meeting the deficiency, which would be about $1,200. The 
Rev. Dr. Shelton was requested to furnish a suitable inscription to be 
cast on each bell. 

January 8, 1857, the committee reported that the chime of nine 
bells had been procured as ordered, and placed in the tower ; and they 
recommended that another bell be purchased, to make the chime con- 
sist of ten bells instead of nine, which was ordered done. The sched- 
ule of weights of the ten bells was as follows : 



Tenor, E^, 

F, 
G, 
A^, 
B^, 
C, 
(Flat 7th) D^, 
D, 

F, 



2, 500 lbs. 

1,800 " 

1,250 " 

1,050 " 

800 " 

620 " 

580 " 

550 " 

530 " 

g,68o lbs. 
480 " 

10,160 lbs. 



The Chimes of St. Paul's. 301 

With their mountings, frames, etc., the total weight is close to 
14,000 lbs. The chime gives the whole octave in the key of Ei5, 
namely : "Kb, F, G, Kb, Bb, C, D, 'Kb, and F beyond the octave, and Db 
— (the Flat 7th) — as an accidental. Also, in the key of A^, the follow- 
ing series of tones ; Kb, Bi5, C, T)b, 'Eib, F, with G, F, E^ below the 
key-note — and in this case D becomes the accidental. 

Ten bells is the number generally used to form a complete chime 
for all practical purposes ; it will play all the tunes that are usually 
required. 

The musical notation of the chimes of St. Paul's seems never to 
have been correctly published since they were placed in the tower. 
An error in the description, first made in the records of the " Chime 
Fund Association," has been repeated whenever the bells have been 
referred to, and, in addition to this, the tone value of the tenth bell 
has been omitted entirely. The matter was referred to the Messrs. 
Meneely & Co., of Watervliet, West Troy, N. Y., successors to the 
makers of St. Paul's chime, and to their courtesy we are indebted for 
the corrected notation as given here. 

August 13, 1857, the treasurer reports the amount of the Chime 
Fund to be $5,268.95. Of this sum, 11,138.36 was from "the young 
ladies' fair, held for the benefit of the Chime Fund at American Hall, 
December 12, 1856." Of the $5,268.95, was expended: To A. 
Meneely's Sons for the ten bells, with ringing apparatus, $4,053.78 ; 
for freight, rope, extra work, etc., $205.47 ; paid for adjusting bells for 
chiming, complete, roof over bells in tower, fitting up ringing room, 
etc., $260.44 ; leaving a balance of $749.26. The bells and the bal- 
ance of the fund were then handed over to St. Paul's Church vestry. 
The vestry agreed, for themselves and successors, to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $100 annually, if necessary, to be applied towards 
ringing and chiming the bells and keeping them in order. 

The inscriptions prepared for the bells by the Rev. Dr. Shelton are 
strikingly appropriate. A general description of the chimes, with a list 
of the inscriptions, appears in the original book of minutes of the 



302 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Chime Fund Association. This description has been quoted in the 
few brief accounts of the bells which have appeared in print. There 
were some apparent errors, however, and it was thought best to obtain 
the inscriptions directly from the bells themselves as they are now 
hung in the tower. With some difficulty this was accomplished, and 
several variations and additions to the list as recorded were found. 
The belfry is crowded with mechanism and the heavy framework and 
timbers supporting the bells, so that a thorough examinatian of the 
inscriptions is difficult. The exact wording, as cast upon the bells, is 
here given. 

The largest of the cluster of bells is called the " Christian Bell," 
and bears the following inscription: "A. D. 1856. «{• Bethlehem. 
Calvary. Bethany." 

The second bell, called the "Bishop's Bell," is inscribed : "A. U. 
1856. William Heathcote De Lancey, D. D., LL. D., D. C. L. Oxon., 
First Bishop of Western New York. Consecrated A. D. 1839." (Re- 
verse) " If a man desire the office of Bishop, he desireth a good work." 

The "Rector's Bell " is inscribed: "A. D. 1856. William Shel- 
ton, D. D., Rector. Instituted A. D., 1829." (Reverse.) "The Church 
of the Living God, the pillar and ground of the Truth." 

The "Historical Bell" has the inscription: "A. D. 1856. St. 
Paul's Church, Buffalo, organized A, D. 1817 ; the first church conse- 
crated A. D. 1819 ; this church consecrated A. D. 1851." " Let every- 
thing that hath breath praise the Lord." (Reverse.) " Trinity Church, 
Buffalo, organized A. D. 1836. St. John's Church, Buffalo organ- 
ized A. D. 1845. St. James' Church, Buffalo, organized A. D. 1853. 
Church of the Ascension, Buffalo, organized A. D. 1855." 

The statement as cast on the " Historical Bell," that the first — or 
frame — church was consecrated in 18 19 is an error. The corner- 
stone was laid in 1819, butthe building was not consecrated until 1821. 
This error on the bell was evidently noticed, and some one was appa- 
rently sent to erase the incorrect figures. Instead, he has increased 
the mistake by leaving the wrong date 1819 untouched, and chiseling 



The Chimes of St. Paul's. 303 

off 51 in the date — 185 1 — of the consecration of the stone edifice, 
which was correct — having evidently confused the two conse- 
crations. 

The "Chime Fund Bell" is thus inscribed: "A. D. 1856. St. 
Paul's Church Chime Fund, founded A. D. 1850. These bells were 
placed in this tower chiefly through the efforts of the younger mem- 
bers of the parish, comprising the 'Chime Fund.* 'The liberal de- 
viseth liberal things, and by liberal things shall he stand.' " 

The "Sunday Bell" is inscribed: "A. D. 1856. We announce 
the sacred day of rest. We assemble the people for worship." 

The "Sacramental Bell" inscribed: "A. D. 1856. We welcome 
the infant at the font. We invite the youth to confirmation. We 
invoke the faithful to the Holy Communion." 

The "Patriotic Bell" is inscribed: "A. D. 1856. We proclaim 
the birthday of the Nation's freedom. We applaud the virtues of pat- 
riots and heroes." 

The "Bridal and Burial Bell" is inscribed: "A. D. 1856. Joyful 
our peal for the Bridal ! Mournful our plaint for the Dead ! " 

The tenth bell was hung subsequently, and was named the " Citi- 
zens' Bell," in consideration of sundry subscriptions by citizens not 
members of St. Paul's Parish. It is inscribed : " A. D. 1857. This bell 
is added to the chime through the liberality of citizens of Buffalo." 

On the completion of the belfry of the smaller tower, in 185 1, on the 
Church Street side of the new edifice, the original bell from the frame 
church was hung there, having been retained when the frame structure 
was sold and removed. This bell was bought by the vestry in 182 1, from 
Horatio Hanks, and was recast in 1827, its tone not being satisfactory. 
(See pages 21 and 27.) It is inscribed, "Cochran & Fisher, Batavia, 
1827." This firm recast the bell in that year and redated it accordingly. 

In the fire of 1888, the timbers supporting this old bell in the small 
tower were partially burned, and the bell was thrown out of place, but 
not seriously damaged. It is now rung at the hour (ii A. M.) of the 
celebration of the Holy Communion on Thursdays and Holy Days. 



304 History of St. Paul's Church. 

One of the Buffalo papers, of December, 1856, reports that " The 
St. Paul's chime sounded for the first time on Christmas Eve. The 
bells are remarkably sweet and musical, and in perfect harmony. 
.... Service was held on Christmas Eve, and St. Paul's was filled 
with a large and profoundly attentive flock. After the service, and 
again at twelve o'clock, the chimes rang through the city their 
delightful sounds, enlivening the spirits and animating the hearts of 
all the faithful." .... 

Among Dr. Shelton's bequests to St. Paul's was one of $2,000, the 
interest of which he directed should be used for ringing and chiming 
the bells. (Page 149.) 

Nathaniel Tucker, Sr., was engaged to superintend the hanging of 
the bells in the tower in 1856, and the installation of the chiming appa- 
ratus in 1857. Mr. Tucker pealed and chimed the bells for twenty-five 
years, and his services will be referred to later. Thomas F. Thornton, 
then a member of the choir of St. Paul's, took much of the responsi- 
bility of fitting up the bells, and was the first to chime them, resigning 
from the choir in 1857 in order to devote more time to these duties. 
Mr. Thornton died in 1865. He was a member of St. Luke's first 
vestry in 1857. 

On February 10, 1857, at a meeting called for the purpose in the 
belfry, was formed St. Paul's Church Bell Ringing Association "to 
secure the regular and skillful ringing of the bells of St. Paul's Church." 
A constitution, prepared by Thomas F. Thornton, was adopted. 
According to the original manuscript, the object of the association 
was to " secure the ringing of the bells of St. Paul's Church as a peal, 
on all proper occasions, as Sundays, Church festivals, national holi- 
days, etc." It was further provided that " the funds of the association 
shall be regarded as a Mutual Benefit Fund, excepting donations given 
for bridal peals and week-day ringing, which shall be at the disposal of 
the members who ring the peals." The membership was at first limited 
to sixteen. Those who signed the constitution, at this time, were : 
Thomas F. Thornton, William Channon, John Lock, Nathaniel 



o 

H 

X 







The Chimes of St. Paul's. 305 

Tucker, Thomas Hickman, George Scott, John Bishop, and Mark 
Stonham. 

At the next meeting, February 25, 1857, the members showed their 
appreciation of Edward S. Warren, president of the Chime Fund 
Association, and long active in the musical affairs of the parish, by 
electing him as their own first president ; Thomas Hickman was elected 
vice-president. 

The association proved very successful, and continued in active 
operation for over twenty years. The members were all Englishmen, 
most of whom had rung bells in the old country, and by these men 
and their successors — in several cases the sons succeeding their 
fathers — the St. Paul's bells were pealed upon Sundays and church 
festivals, as well as weekly, at first on Saturday nights and in later 
years on Thursday nights. 

The pealing of the bells required skill and long practice, and the 
service was voluntary, being done from love of old associations. In the 
days of "the old-fashioned Fourth of July" the city authorities often 
engaged these bell-ringers to celebrate the day with a triumphant peal. 
Dr. Shelton took a great interest in the ringers ; he set aside pews in 
the church for their use, frequently visited them in the ringers' room 
in the tower, and on such occasions, it is said, never failed to leave 
behind him as a memento of his visit, a five-dollar gold piece, which 
went into the treasury of the association. It was also his custom each 
January to entertain them at the rectory with a bountiful supper, he 
himself presiding at the head of the table. 

Owing to business and other changes affecting the individual mem- 
bers, it was found impossible to continue the organization. Probably 
the last time the bells were pealed was at the funeral of Mrs. Shelton, 
in 1882. Few of the men now survive. To two of these, Henry J. 
Hobbs and Robert D. Harris of Buffalo, who rang during the '70's, we 
are indebted for some personal details of the old bell-ringers of St. 
Paul's during that period. It is pleasant, too, to add their testimony 
of the affectionate respect felt by all of the members for Dr. Shelton. 



3o6 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Peals may be rung upon any number of bells from three to twelve 
— twelve being the largest number ever rung as a peal. Three bells 
allow six " changes," while upon twelve bells, it is stated that the enor- 
mous number of 479,001,600 "changes" are mathematically possible. 
Eight bells, giving the octave, are called the perfect peal. With eight 
bells, 40,320 changes are possible. At Leeds Church, Kent, England, 
the ringing of these changes was actually accomplished in the year 
1761, by thirteen men in twenty-seven hours of continuous ringing, 
and "is the fullest complete peal that has ever been rung.'' 

By using the No. 7 bell — D^, the " Flat 7th " — peals may be rung 
in the key of A*; and this bell and the loth — or F (treble) bell — 
are especially useful in giving the added notes often needed in playing 
tunes when the bells are chimed. In pealing, a leader was required to 
" call " the peal to the men at the ropes ; two men were needed for the 
large bell (No. 1, the "tenor"), and one man for each of the others, 
making the services of twelve men necessary when all the bells were 
pealed, as was often the case at St. Paul's. The usual eight or six-bell 
peal required ten and eight men respectively. One of the old bell- 
ringers asserts that pealing bells at St. Paul's was " the finest exercise 
in the world." The term "changes" is applied to ringing the bells in 
any variation from their regular order in the scale. A " peal," techni- 
cally, is not less than 5,000 different changes, and occupies about three 
hours. The ringing of a lesser number of changes is called, in ring- 
ers' parlance, " a touch," or " flourish." 

In pealing, the bells themselves are swung, and the sound is pro- 
duced by the freely-swinging clappers striking the sides. The greater 
beauty of the tones given by swinging bells over those struck when 
stationary is spoken of by all writers on the subject. 

At one end of the rotating yokes upon which the bells are hung, in 
the belfry of St. Paul's, are large, grooved wheels of wood, and lying 
in these grooves and fastened to the rim a little below the top of the 
wheel on one side, were the ropes, which passed down, on one side of 
the wheel, through square wooden pipes, placed in line with the rim of 



The Chimes of St. Paul's. 307 

the wheel, and running down to the bell-ringers' room in the third 
story of the tower, just below the room in which the levers for chiming 
the bells are placed. The point of attachment of the rope to the rim 
of the wheel of course turned with it, and the pull (or point of lever- 
age) of the rope on the rim consequently shifted back and forth dur- 
ing the ringing. 

To provide for this, a fixed pulley was placed at the top of the 
square pipe, which served to guide the rope into the pipe during these 
movements. As the method of handling the bells in pealing is little 
understood, a few words of explanation may not be out of place. 
Before beginning the peal, each bell was "set," or inverted. This was 
accomplished by pulling on the rope and swinging the bell until its own 
momentum carried it, mouth upwards, just beyond the center of its axis, 
where it was prevented from turning entirely over by a "stopper " or 
"stay '' fastened upon the yoke, which engaged with a buffer. called the 
"slide," upon the framework. 

In the meantime the grooved wheel had, of course, turned with 
the bell, the point of attachment of the rope on the rim of the wheel 
had turned with it, and the point of leverage of the rope upon the rim 
had shifted to the other side of the center, so that by pulling on the 
same rope the bell could be held back or " eased " into its position as 
it passed over the center, and too violent a contact of the " stopper " 
and "slide" thus prevented. With all the bells thus inverted the 
pealing was begun. The bell was now in such a position that a com- 
paratively slight pull upon the same rope which had served to raise it, 
would throw it off the balance and bring it down again, to make a full 
swing and, by its own momentum come up upon the other side and 
over the center, to be held as before by the "stopper" and "slide," 
the latter so called because it automatically adjusted itself to hold the 
inverted bell just off the center, at either end of its swing. 

Between the strokes, the bell, of course, remained inverted, and at 
each pull of the rope a complete revolution was made, first in one 
direction and then in the other. The bell rang once at the end of each 



3o8 History of St. Paul's Church. 

swing, just as it was "eased" over the center, and the quality of the 
sound was dependent upon the skill with which this was done. As the 
ringer had full control of the swings, of course he had full control of 
the strokes also. Skillful handling was necessary in " setting " the 
heavy bells just off the balance, at the end of each stroke so that they 
could be safely held inverted by the stoppers and slides. A little care- 
lessness, especially in " easing " the bell, as above described, might 
have torn these out, and endangered the framework itself, and might 
even have thrown the bell from its supports and sent the heavy mass 
of metal crashing down through the floors of the tower. Indeed, at 
one time an accident of this kind very nearly occurred at St. Paul's, 
but fortunately the bell was caught and held by the strong oak timbers 
of the framework. Few of the ropes, " stoppers " or " slides " are now in 
place. The corner platform for the leader, and some of the swinging 
seats against the wall, used by the men, can still be seen in the ringers' 
room. The peals were spoken of as "open" or "muffled." The 
muffled peal was given by fastening leather " mufflers " upon one side 
of the clapper, to deaden the stroke, and thus, when the bell was 
swung, one series of notes would be of the usual clearness, and the suc- 
ceeding series deadened, producing a most somber effect. For prac- 
tice, the clapper was entirely muffled. The open peal was rung without 
any obstruction on the clapper. Many citizens, not yet old, recall 
with pleasure the pealing of the bells on Christmas — "The merry, 
merry bells of Yule "—and on New Year's Eve, under the skillful hand- 
ling of the old bell-ringers. Hood speaks of bells as "the music 
nearest heaven." They touch both extremes of human emotion. 
What sound can be more joyful than the merry peal, or what more 
sombre than the muffled peal with its melancholy cadence? This 
pealing of the bells is entirely different in effect from the chiming or 
ringing of tunes and melodies, and one who has heard it does not 
readily forget it. It is as if living voices floated out from the .belfry, 
and one ceases to wonder at the fantasies of poets, so many of whom 
have sung of the pealing bells as of animate beings. The changes 



The Chimes of St. Paul's. 309 

rung in the old days at St. Paul's on New Year's Eve seemed the very 
realization of Tennyson's — 

' ' Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky. 
The flying cloud, the frosty light ; 
The year is dying in the night ; 
Ring out, wild bells, and let him die." 

To the present generation, however, the pealing of St. Paul's bells is 
an unknown experience. For twenty years past they have been chimed 
only, but efforts are now being made to organize a new pealing guild. 

The bells are now (1903) rung every day at noon, as well as on Sun- 
days arid Holy Days ; the selections are principally familiar hymns, and 
the chiming is done by a single operator, through a system of levers 
numbered from one to ten. These levers communicate by a compli- 
cated arrangement of chains and pulleys, with pivoted hammers, which 
strike the bells when the levers are pulled. The bells themselves 
remain stationary. The difference in tone given by the bells when 
swung and struck by their clappers, over that given when struck by the 
pivoted hammers, as at present arranged, is remarkable. The tone 
produced by the hammer is much less sweet and musical, the ham- 
mers seeming to interfere with the perfect vibration of the bells, and 
marring their really fine tones. In fact, the mechanism for chiming at 
St. Paul's is clumsy and antiquated ; the levers work irregularly, and 
call for an undue amount of exertion on the part of the player, and 
the numbering and arrangement are not in accordance with present 
usage. It is a common occurrence for some part of the apparatus to 
break down in the middle of a tune, which the chimer has then to 
finish as best he can — a fact of which the critic in the street is of 
course unaware. The hammers for chiming at St. Paul's are placed 
below the bells, so as not to interfere with their swinging if it is desired 
to peal them. 

In modern chiming arrangements, excellent tones are produced, 
but, unfortunately, in all, or nearly all, of these devices, the hammers 
are so placed that the bells cannot be swung for pealing. In fact, 



310 History of St. Paul's Church. 

they are usually hung stationary, and cannot be swung at all, thus ren- 
dering pealing forever impossible. Plans are now under consideration 
for putting the bells at St. Paul's in more perfect tune, and for the 
introduction of an improved method of chiming. It is hoped that this 
may be accomplished without interfering with the possibility of some- 
time again pealing the bells. With suitable mechanism, it would be 
quite possible for a good operator to play, not merely hymns and 
melodies, but to reproduce many of the pealing and changing effects 
which the old bell-ringers rendered so well years ago. 

The chimer's room is thirteen feet six inches square, and lighted by 
four small lancet windows. It is in the fourth story of the tower. 
Over the keyboard is the motto, " Praise + ye + the •!" Lord," with 
a design of swinging bells at each end, and underneath is a rack for 
the music. On the sixth floor is the belfry, a double story twenty- 
three feet four inches in height, by thirteen feet six inches square. In 
this space the ten bells are hung at various altitudes, supported on tim- 
bers of solid oak, the frame-work being constructed and supported in 
accordance with Mr. Upjohn's recommendations, so as to transmit as 
little vibration as possible to the stone walls of the tower. A small and 
twisting stairway winds here and there among the bells, and leads to 
the spire, which begins immediately above the belfry. There are eight 
great louvre windows in the belfry, two on each of the four sides. 

The tower is entirely separate from the church, except in the first 
story, where the doorway from the south, or Erie Street, porch leads 
into the " tower room." At the southwest corner of this room is the 
entrance to the spiral stairway leading to the different stories above. 

For many years, previous to 1882, the records of the Diocese of 
Western New York were kept in cases built in the " tower room," 
in the first story. In the fall of 1882, the second floor of the tower 
was fitted up as a muniment room, and the records were removed 
there. They passed safely through the fire of 1888, but show marks of 
the water and smoke. In July, 1895, this use of the room was discon- 
tinued, and the records were then placed in one of the fireproof build- 



H 

X 




The Chimes of St. Paul's. 311 

ings of the city. The records of the vestry of St. Paul's were at one 
time kept in the tower, but are now in the hands of the rector, at the 
Parish House, which is of fireproof construction. 

The stairway is in the stone turret buttress at the southwest angle 
of the tower. This turret buttress is skillfully harmonized with the 
buttresses at the other angles of the tower, but differs from them in 
design, being larger, octagonal in plan, and pierced with small win- 
dows to light the stairs within. In addition to furnishing space for the 
stairway, this buttress appears, to the eye, to balance the mass of the 
edifice upon the opposite side, and adds an especially fine feature to 
the noble lines of the general design. The spiral stairway runs up for 
five .stories, the doorways to the different floors opening onto it. At 
the fifth story the turret dies into the tower, and a straight stairway 
continues along the inner wall of the tower to the belfry. The stairs 
wind irregularly among the bells, as before stated, and above the 
belfry, in the spire, they follow the narrowing walls, broken by 
frequent platforms or landings, and finally terminate at the topmost 
windows, where the heavy crossed beams support the lower end of the 
fifty-foot iron rod, which passes up through the great stone finial of 
the spire and holds in place the gilded cross. Above the stairs a rough 
ladder of wooden cross pieces nailed to a stout upright timber leads to 
one more landing, far above which extend the dim recesses of the 
slender stone cone, lighted at the top by four round openings. 

As before stated, the chiming apparatus was installed in the spring 
of 1857, and the bells were first chimed by Thomas F. Thornton, who 
took a great interest in the work and continued it for several years, 
until his health began to fail. 

There are no available records to show who his immediate successor 
was ; undoubtedly some member of the association for pealing the 
bells took his place, possibly Nathaniel Tucker, Sr., but probably 
Nicholas Olver. Existing records show that Mr. Olver was chiming 
the bells early in 1871, and continued until January i, 1882, at which 
time his age made it necessary for him to retire. The association for 



312 History of St. Paul's Church. 

pealing the bells had, by this time, practically disbanded, although the 
bells were pealed on one or two later occasions ; and Nathaniel Tucker, 
Sr. (or N. H. Tucker, as his name is sometimes given in the records), 
who had been one of the founders of the pealing association in 1857, 
and a leader in the organization ever since that time, in spite of his 
own advanced age, followed Mr. Olver as the chimer, January i, 1882. 
Mr. Tucker chimed the bells admirably until 1885, at which time he 
left Buffalo, and on May i, 1885, the vestry voted a request that the 
rector, the Rev. Dr. Brown, should write to him a letter, expressive of 
their appreciation of his long and faithful service of more than a quar- 
ter of a century. Ever since then the service has been generally ren- 
dered by different young men connected with the vested choir. The 
first of these was Frederick T. Johnson, who began on September i, 
1885, and continued to chime the bells for about five years. It was he 
who chimed at the time of the fire. May 10, 1888. He was assisted 
during the latter part of his service by Henry S. Sizer, then a member 
of the vested choir, and now the Rev. Henry S. Sizer. 

Mr. Sizer succeeded Mr. Johnson, and chimed the bells for a 
time, assisted by some of the other members of the choir, and by the 
sexton, then Wm. Graveson, who was an Englishman, and familiar 
with bells. In November, 1892, Frank Gedies took charge of the bells 
and chimed them until February 18, 1900, when he left Buffalo. Mr. 
Gedies took much interest in his work. It was he who put the motto, 
which has been mentioned, over the chiming frame, and upon the inner 
side of the stone lintel of the doorway carved a smiling cherub face. 
Herbert A. White succeeded him, and chimed the bells for eight or ten 
months, followed by his brother, David White, and then by Roy Van 
Valkenberg, who volunteered for a time. Richard Scobell played 
from August 24, 1901, to January 12, 1902. Henry S. Spelder was 
chimer from January 15 to August 3, 1902, when Arthur Cashmore 
became the chimer, assisted by several of the young men of the choir. 
This arrangement is still (1903) continued. 

One of the Buffalo papers, in 1893, speaking of an especially 



The Chimes of St. Paul's. 



313 



snowy and stormy Sunday night, says : " But the few people who were 
on the streets were not left without music appropriate to Sunday even- 
ing. St. Paul's bells played the soothing 'Russian Evening Hymn.' 
The belfry was hidden from sight by the aerial drifts, which isolated 
pedestrians the one from the other and gave each a little snow-bound 
world of his own. But to every wanderer came the message from the 
steeple, all other sounds and sights being shut out." .... 

The following is a poetic fancy which the pealing of St. Paul's bells 
suggested to the late Allen G. Bigelow, who was at one time a member 
of the choir of St. Paul's, and whose early death was so greatly deplored. 
The poem was printed in "Bohemia" for December 23, 1882 : 

THE SPIRIT OF THE BELLS. 



High in the belfry of St. Paul's 
A strange, weird spirit dwells, 

Amid the ghostly wheels and ropes, — 
The Spirit of the Bells. 

As often as the bells are swung, 

The Spirit loudly sings ; 
Now wild and sweet, now gay, now sad. 

His changeful music rings. 

On Sabbath mom the Spirit's voice 

Loud o'er the city peals. 
At evening, like the Angelus, 

His silvery summons steals. 

******** 

Amid the perfume of the flowers 
Which Easter morning brings, 

A risen and triumphant Lord 
The Spirit loudly sings. 

Again, beneath the wintry moon 

The Spirit's voice I hear, 
'Mid flying snow and flying cloud, 

Proclaim the glad New Year. 



But ah ! When Christmas-tide returns, — 
The birth-night of our Lord, — 

'Twould seem a year's glad ringing then 
Within the bells is stored. 

The Spirit holds high carnival 

Up in his belfry then ! 
And " Gloria in Excelsis" sings, 

And " Peace, good-will to men." 

He swings the pealing bells about, 

The iron cups o'erflow 
And dash their floods of melody 

Upon the streets below. 



Oh city ! Canst thou e'er forget 

This tale the Spirit tells 
High in the tower of old St. Paul's, 

Among the swinging bells ? 

Amid the roar of busy streets 
Which better feeling quells, 

List to that voice from old St. Paul's - 
The Spirit of the Bells. 



3,14 History of St. Paul's Church. 



TEbe (Breat Uower an& Spire. 

The proportions of the majestic tower and spire of St. Paul's, so 
perfect and satisfying to the most critical eye, become more appreciated 
as they are compared with other examples of such work, either in this 
country or abroad. 

In the accepted design, as at first submitted by the architect, Richard 
Upjohn, Sr., the main spire had more windows than as finally built, and 
the junction of the octagon of the spire with the square of the tower 
was ornamented with small but elaborate open-work buttresses of stone. 
The angles of the octagons of both the large and small spires, for 
their full heights, were ornamented with carved crockets. On Decem- 
ber 21, 1866, when the work of building the spire was about to begin, 
Mr. Upjohn, in a letter to Dr. Shelton (quoted on page 103), speaks of 
simplifying the design, as " it will then be quite rich enough to accord 
with the severity of the tower and church." The change was a happy 
one, as it brought the fine lines of the structure into much stronger relief. 

(See the reproduction, at page 68, of the lithographs of the church, 
published in 185 1 for the benefit of the Chime Fund. Also, the illus- 
trations of the wooden model of the church in 1850, at page 390.) 

The junction of the spire and the tower is most successfully car- 
ried out, yet with the utmost apparent simplicity of design, without 
any of the devices of using pinnacles, parapets or other ornamental 
stone-work to cover up the difficulties of uniting an octagon and a 
square. It is called, architecturally, a "broach " spire. 

Mr. Upjohn's preliminary design for St. Paul's, as shown in the 
colored perspective drawing, preserved at the Parish House, exhibits 
interesting differences from the design finally adopted. The junction 
of the tower and spire is ornamented with corner pinnacles, and small 
open-work buttresses. The turret buttress is at the northwest corner 
of the tower instead of at the southwest. The west porch has no 
pediment and there is no flying buttress above it. The chapel on the 




THE RESTORED ST PAUL'S. 
From southwest corner Pearl and Swan streets, showing the Cireat Tower and Spire. (See pages 314 to 318 ) 



Photograph by G l{ U , September, 1502. 



The Great Tower and Spire. 315 

north side of the church is only about one-half the height of that in the 
design accepted later. The general lines of the edifice, as shown in this 
preliminary study, were not otherwise materially changed in the final plan. 

The tower of St. Paul's forms the west wall of the south porch, and 
the south wall of the west porch, otherwise it is entirely disconnected 
from the main body of the church. The only entrance to the tower is 
by the doorway from the first floor of the south, or Erie Street, porch, 
which opens through the connecting wall into the " tower room." The 
stone-arched entrance to the west porch forms the base of the adjoining 
buttress of the tower. 

There are curious discrepancies in the various statements of the 
height of the main tower and spire. 

In a description of Mr. Upjohn's plans, published shortly before 
the work on the new church was begun, in 1849, the measurements of 
the church are very fully given. The height of the tower from the 
base line to its junction with the spire was originally intended to be 
ii6 feet, and the height of the spire, 109 feet ; total, 225 feet. (See 
account of the wooden model, page 390.) The height of the spire 
was, however, much increased as finally built. 

At page 109, in this volume, is quoted an article from the Buffalo 
Express of August i, 1870, which gives the distance from the ground 
level to the top of the finial as 255 feet, the cross adding three feet 
eight inches, making 258 feet eight inches. 

On page 103, in a quotation from the minutes of the building 
committee in 1867, a plan showing the height of the spire from the 
square of the tower as 120 feet is spoken of. The height was, however, 
still further increased. 

The Buffalo Commercial of Saturday, August 7, 1869, speaking of 
St. Paul's spire, then about sixteen feet above the tower, and in course 
of construction, says : .... " Height of tower, 120 feet; spire and 
cross, 130 feet"; total, 250 feet. The walls at the top of the tower 
are twenty-two feet square and four feet thick. " The carved finial is 
to be four feet ten inches in height, and surmounted by an Episcopal 



3i6 History of St. Paul's Church. 

cross of copper gilt, three feet eight inches high, connected with the 
spire by an iron bar fifty feet long, the lower end of which will be 
fastened to an oak beam, which will be set in the masonry." The 
spire of Trinity Church, New York City, is given as 260 feet high. It 
has been asserted, however, by the builder that it is no higher than 
that of St. Paul's (see page 109), not having been carried to the height 
called for by the plans. 

In the copyright title of the photographs taken from the scaffold- 
ing on the spire by C. L. Pond, shortly before the completion in 
1870, the height is given as 266 feet. On page 142, this volume, 
in the description of the church in 1883, the figures 274 feet are given. 

A measurement, in September, 1895, computed from the ground 
by triangulation, by courtesy of Henry L. Lyon, Civil Engineer, gives 
the height as 254 feet to the top of the cross. 

Still another measurement, in August, 1897, kindly made by Lawson 
Adams, contractor for the new lightning rod put up in that year, gives the 
height of the main tower and spire, taken from the top of the cross to 
the ground, by means of a light measuring rope, as 266 feet. 

Another computation by triangulation, was made by Guthrie & 
Diehl, Civil Engineers, in October, 1902, with the following result : 
Height of tower, 114 feet 5 inches ; height of spire, 132 feet ; cross, 3 
feet 7 inches ; total, 250 feet. 

These three later computations were made especially for this 
History. 

The cross on the main spire of St. Paul's was put in place August 
6, 1870. (See pages 108, 109.) 

The Buffalo Commercial Qi October 3, 187 1, says: "The finial of 
the belfry spire [of the Church Street, or small, tower] of St. Paul's 
Church was placed yesterday, thus completing an edifice that was begun 
more than a score of years ago, and which, long before it was finished, 
was regarded as the most attractive object in the city. [See note foot 
of page III.] We understand that the distinguished architect, Mr. Up- 
john of New York, deems it nearer to perfection than any other of the 



The Great Tower and Spire. 317 

many beautiful churches he has designed, and we know that it is the 
admiration of all beholders But there is an ancient and dilapi- 
dated structure near by that is not so handsome. We allude to the 
venerable looking shed in which the stones have been cut and worked 
for St. Paul's, and which has disfigured the street more years than we 
care to specify — so long, that the memory of man runneth not to the 
contrary. This hoary old nuisance of a shed should not be suffered to 
cumber the ground a day longer, now that there is not a shadow of 
excuse for it." .... 

The old shed shows in the photographic illustration opposite page 
no, in this volume, taken before the small spire on Church Street 
was finished. 

(For a description of the arrangement of the interior of the main 
tower, belfry, etc., and of the turret buttress at the southwest 
angle of the tower, see pages 310, 311 of the chapter in this book 
on "The Chimes of St. Paul's." — For height of smaller tower and 
spire, see page 142.) 

An examination of the exterior of the main spire, which we recently 
made through a powerful glass, resulted in some interesting discov- 
eries. Running up the stem of the finial, facing towards Pearl Street, 
is carved the name of the superintendent of the construction of the 
spire, "HURLBERT." (See pages 107, 121.) 

Upon the opposite side of the stem, facing Main Street, is similarly 
carved the name of the master stonecutter and mason, " CASS." 

(See page 107.) 

A short distance below the finial are four small, round openings in 
the stone, facing north, south, east and west. Immediately below the 
level of these, upon the southwest face of the spire, is a stone bearing 
the following inscription : 

"FOUNDED 1817 

COMPLETED 1870 

WILLIAM SHELTON 

RECTOR." 



3i8 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Some distance below this, about half way to the tops of the 
highest windows, at the westerly angle of the spire, facing down Erie 
Street, is a stone marked in large letters: — 

"S. E. M. 
1870." 

The significance of this we have been unable to ascertain. The 
stone bought with money given in 1864 by the Right Rev. W. J. 
Trower, Lord Bishop of Gibraltar, and which it was intended to mark 
with his name and the initials of his diocese, we have been unable to 
identify. Bishop Trower resigned his see in 1868, before the spire 
was built, and a different inscription, — one perhaps even suggested by 
him, — may have been adopted. Possibly, if the story of the letters 
" S. E. M." referred to above, were known, they might prove to mark 
the stone he gave. (See pages 432, 433.) 

We have found no record of any of these interesting inscriptions, 
nor have we found any one who knew of their existence. 

It will be noticed in some of the illustrations in this volume, from 
photographs taken in former years, that the church in its entirety, and 
especially the great tower and spire, seemed to dominate the surround- 
ing buildings of the smaller city almost like a foreign cathedral. 

The general effect of this noble piece of architecture is now some- 
what interfered with by the numerous high buildings since erected about 
it, marking the progress of Buffalo from a small to a great city ; but 
the view of the "cross-topped spire" from the southwest, as one 
looks up through the wide expanse of Erie Street towards Main Street, 
is particularly impressive and beautiful. 

" It peereth in the air 
O'er the holy place of prayer . . . 
Like a watchman, at his post, 

Let it say — 
Here the Lord Jehovah dwells, 
Here ring the holy bells, 
Here the Church's service swells ; 

Come and pray ! " 



The Music, i8iy-igoj. 319 

Xlbe ^usic at St. Paul's. 

1817-1903. 

" And these that sing shall pass away ; Be sure thy children's children here 

New choirs their room shall fill : Shall hear those anthems still." 

The rendering of the musical portion of the services has always 
been a matter of importance in St. Paul's Parish. Beginning in a very 
small and primitive way, the music improved as the parish emerged 
from its missionary beginnings early in the century, and grew and 
increased with the growth of the church. The musical affairs have 
been under the general direction of the music committees appointed 
by the vestries. These committees usually engaged the organists, 
and consulted with them as to the rendering of the music, subject, of 
course, to the rector's approval. The different committees did efficient 
and faithful work, but they did not consider it necessary to keep for- 
mal records of their proceedings, and few of their reports made to the 
various vestries can now be found, and those that are in existence are 
usually lacking in details. It has been consequently difficult to follow 
the dififerent changes and growth of the music. It has been necessary 
to consult the books of the various treasurers, and many other old rec- 
ords and documents of the parish, old newspaper files, scrap books, 
and programmes. The Buffalo newspapers paid little attention to 
church festivals or church music, or indeed to music of any kind, until 
about the year 1864, when John R. Drake began his interesting musi- 
cal and dramatic notes in the Buffalo Commercial Advertiser. These 
notes and similar information in other Buffalo papers have helped in 
filling out some parts of the record given here. 

In the very early days of St. Paul's the choir was composed of 
Jacob A. Barker, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge and Stephen G. Austin, 
assisted by a few of the ladies of the parish whose names are not men- 
tioned. Dr. Trowbridge was also a member of the first vestry. 
There is no record of any musical instrument being in use at St. Paul's 
at this time. On March 29, 1820, the oldest musical society in Buffalo 
was organized, called the " Musica Sacra Society," and the Rev. Deo- 



320 History of St. Paul's Church. 

datus Babcock, who, a few weeks later, became the second rector of 
St. Paul's, was its leader and teacher. This society's membership list 
of fifty contains the names of most of the prominent residents of Buf- 
falo of that day. 

The first frame edifice of St. Paul's was consecrated February 25, 
1821. The village newspaper, The Buffalo Patriot, of July 10, 1821, 
had the following in regard to St. Paul's choir, which was a voluntary 
one, on the occasion of the fourth of July celebration in that year : 
, . . . " The procession marched to the Episcopal Church." .... 
The services were "commenced by singing an appropriate hymn," and 
" were concluded by singing Hail Columbia. The able manner with 
which the choir acquitted themselves on the occasion was highly grati- 
fying to the audience." .... And of the celebration of the fourth of 
July, 1824, the same paper reports that, during the services at St. 
Paul's, " the singing was performed in a style creditable to the choir 
and highly gratifying to all." These are probably the earliest recorded 
musical criticisms in Buffalo, and serve to make almost audible to us 
those far-off strains of " Hail Columbia," sung by voices so long ago 
hushed. At the beginning of the rectorate of the Rev. Addison 
Searle, in March, 1825, he was given authority by the vestry to pur- 
chase an organ for the church. This was done by subscription, dated 
March, 1825 (see page 25). On August 22, 1825, "the organ recently 
placed in the church by Hall and Erben, was accepted, and the treasurer 
was instructed to pay them $430." The new organ was in place in time 
for the laying of the corner stone of the City of Ararat, September 2, 
1825, on the " communion table of St. Paul's " (see pages 27 and 366), at 
which time, according to Major Mordecai M. Noah's own account, 
"the full-toned organ commenced its swelling notes, performing the 
Jubilate," and " ' Before Jehovah's Awful Throne' was sung by the 
choir to the tune of Old Hundred." 

At this time the number of communicants reported by St. Paul's to 
the convention was twenty-seven, and the following year, thirty-five. 
In 1827, the report was fifty communicants. 



The Music, i8iy~igoj. 321 

The name of the organist who played at St. Paul's prior to 1827 is 
not known. The first recorded name is that of James D. Sheppard, 
who, in a letter written by him in 1840, says : " May 14, 1827, 1 arrived 
in Buffalo, and commenced my engagement as organist of St. Paul's 
Church, at a salary of $200 per year, and an additional sum of $50 per 
quarter for instruction to the choir." 

Mr. Sheppard was an Englishman by birth, and a musician by nature 
and education. In England he was known as a clever oratorio singer, 
and at times had played the violin in various orchestras, and he had 
heard, and performed with, the great celebrities of his day. He was a 
man of sterling character, and the value of such an organist to the 
little village congregation in those primitive days can be readily appre- 
ciated. His service as organist lasted, with one or two short intermis- 
sons, until the old frame church was sold in 1850. Mr. Sheppard opened 
the first music store in Buffalo, in May, 1827, originally in his own 
name, and now known as Denton, Cottier & Daniels ; and in the same 
year he brought the first piano for sale to the village. People came 
from miles around to see this "strange machine." 

In 1827, the choir consisted of Noah P. Sprague, J. M. Langdon, 
Dr. Stagg, B. Higgins, and Miss Katherine Kip, Miss Fanny Pomeroy, 
Miss Katherine Ransom, Miss Belinda Radcliffe, afterwards Mrs. Rob- 
ert Hollister. 

On November 28, 1827, a subscription amounting to $113.50 was 
made " for the purpose of defraying the expenses of the music in said 
church, for six months ending on the 28th November, 1827." From 
time to time subscriptions were made by different members of the con^ 
gregation, in which they promised to pay certain sums per quarter for 
the tuition of pupils by the organist of St. Paul's. From May 27th to 
December, 1829, two "singing schools" were held each week. 

In the minutes of the vestry meeting of April 23, 1828, occurs the 
first mention of a music committee. Dr. H. R. Stagg reporting for 
such committee. In the year 1828, the church edifice was much 
enlarged, as stated elsewhere in this volume. April 4, 1829, George 



322 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Beach acknowledges receipt of $2.40 for "blowing the organ in the 
church." Another receipt, giving a glimpse of conditions at that time, 
is that of Loring Peirce, the sexton, dated April 18, 1829, for candles. 
Among the items is one of fifty cents " for four pounds candles for 
singers"; also, "sperm candles for chandelier," of more elegance than 
those for the singers. 

In a letter written in 1829, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge says: "Our 
organ is closed, as I understand, on account of there being no funds 
to pay an organist." This stringency, however, could not have lasted 
very long, for in June, 1829, the vestry appointed Dr. Trowbridge a 
committee to sell the organ, and purchase a new one. The subscrip- 
tion list for the new organ, to cost $1,200, is dated September, 1829, 
and amounted to $950. 

On Sunday, September 13, 1829, the Rev. William Shelton preached 
his first sermon as rector of St. Paul's. From December, 1829, to 
September, 1832, a " singing school" was held each week. On January 
19, 1830, the first vestry meeting at which Dr. Shelton presided, it was 
resolved, " that Mr. Sheppard be paid at the rate of $200 per annum 
from the ist September, 1829, and $150 per annum for the nine months 
previous," for his services as organist. 

In 1831, the missionary stipend to St. Paul's was discontinued, and 
the parish became entirely self-supporting. In 1832, Buffalo was 
incorporated as a city, with a population of 10,000. In March, 1833, 
the vestry dispensed with the services of Mr. Sheppard as organist, 
on account of lack of funds ; but the new vestry, a month later, in 
April, reappointed him. In 1836, Trinity Parish was organized, at a 
meeting held at St. Paul's. In 1837, Miss Agnes L. Thompson (after- 
wards Mrs. Edward S. Warren) and Miss Kate Kipp are spoken of as 
singing in the choir. In April, 1839, it having been represented to 
the vestry that many of the congregation were dissatisfied with the 
church music, George B. Webster, Lester Brace and Dr. James P. 
White were appointed the music committee. At this time Mr. Shep- 
pard made a new arrangement with the vestry ; this was to have two 



The Music, iSiy-igoj. 323 

singing schools each week for the instruction of the choir, for which 
he was to be paid $400 per year in quarterly instalments. 

In the autumn of 1839, six members of the choir left Buffalo, and 
others were secured to fill their places. The record mentions no 
names, but the choir usually consisted of ten or twelve singers. 

On the first Monday in December, 1841, R. H. Heywood, Henry 
Hamilton and Lester Brace were appointed as the music committee. 

A musical storm-cloud appears at this time, and on December 6, 
1841, Mr. Sheppard resigned as organist, his resignation taking effect 
on January i, 1842, at which time the parish was considerably in his 
debt. 

On January i, 1842, the new music committee employed Emory Taunt 
to take entire charge of the music of the church. Mr. Taunt was to 
employ an organist and an organ blower, and also to lead the singing 
and to give all instruction necessary to the choir, at least once a week, 
and to give musical instruction in the Sunday School room, and keep 
the organ in repair and tune. The first organist employed by Mr. 
Taunt was Mr. Barton, and later in the year A. L. Webb succeeded 
Mr. Barton. December 27, 1842, the music committee made their 
report saying that, in spite of Mr. Taunt's faithful and zealous efforts, 
they had " not fully realized their expectation of durable improve- 
ment " in the music, and asking that a new committee be appointed. 
E. S. Warren, Lester Brace and Joseph G. Masten were then appointed, 
and they discontinued the services of Mr. Taunt, January i, 1843, and 
employed A L. Webb to play the organ for one month, after which 
Mrs. George Moore became organist and leader of the singing until 
Easter. For lack of expert attention the organ had become badly out 
of repair, and in March, 1843, William Williams made a full written 
report on its condition, in which he referred to Mr. Sheppard as " a 
long-tried friend of our parish." 

In April, 1843, at the vestry election, church music was the burning 
question of the day, and fifty-seven votes were cast, being about three 
times the usual number. The new vestry appointed George B. Web- 



324 History of St. Paul's Church. 

ster, J. A. Barker and Josiah Trowbridge as the music committee. 
The organ being found in very bad condition, from amateur attempts 
at tuning, they were given authority to employ a competent person to 
have it repaired. Mr. Sheppard was engaged to do this work, and 
was also reinstated, from Easter Monday, 1843, in his position as organ- 
ist, which he held until Easter, 1850. 

The committee suggested that it might be advisable to pay certain 
members of the choir who were not members of the church and whose 
services were especially desirable. Mrs. Fallon was so engaged at 
Easter, 1843. This is the first mention of a paid singer in St. Paul's 
choir. Referring to Mr. Sheppard, the music committee said : " The 
committee are also of the opinion that the services of a person well 
qualified to have the charge and direction of the music of the church, 
to play the organ and to be depended on to keep it in tune and preser- 
vation, is greatly undervalued, and most poorly appreciated ; and 
when to these qualifications there are united in the same person a 
devout and reverential spirit and manner, securing respect and consti- 
tuting an important and influential example in the church and especi- 
ally in the gallery, where there is more likely to be levity and a 
disregard for the sacredness of the place — the value and importance 
of such an individual to the church can hardly be over-estimated." 

An entry of 28th January, 1845, says: "For one flute stop to 
organ, by direction of the vestry, $50." On April i, 1845, an agree- 
ment was signed between Miss E. P. Tryon and "St. Paul's Society 
for her singing at the regular services of said church," at $100 per 
year. Miss Tryon sang there until 1850. 

In the choir, in the middle '40's, Miss Joy sang, Miss Webster, Miss 
Elizabeth Hersee, Mr. Houghton, A. H.Caryl, Hunting S. Chamberlain, 
Mr. Hagar and others. About 1845 Robert Denton sang alto in the 
choir. The members met socially and for practice at the home of 
George B.Webster, on the northwest corner of Swan and Franklin streets 
— where the Roman Catholic see house was afterwards built, adjoining 
St. Joseph's Cathedral ; also at the homes of R. H. Heywood and 



The Music, 1817-igoj. 325 

A. H. Caryl. The choir in the frame church was a voluntary one, 
with the few exceptions referred to. During the last year in the frame 
church, 1849, Mr. Denton was assistant organist under Mr. Sheppard. 
One of the drawings made in 1849 of the frame church, reproduced 
at page 38, shows the pipe organ in the gallery over the main 
entrance, at the east or Main Street end of the edifice. This was the 
loft for the organ and choir from the earliest times. 

March 8, 1850, the building committee reported the sale of the 
frame church ; the bell, organ, font, and certain other furniture belong- 
ing to the church were reserved. The frame edifice was sold to the 
German Evangelical Church of Buffalo (St. Peter's), and the last ser- 
vice of St. Paul's congregation in the building was held on Sunday, 
March 17, 1850, after which it was removed to Genesee Street, north- 
east corner of Hickory Street, where it was occupied as St. Peter's 
Church until 1877. The corner stone of the new stone edifice of St. 
Paul's was laid on June 12, 1850. During the building of the stone 
church the congregation leased Clinton Hall, on the southeast corner 
of Clinton and Washington streets, and worshipped there. This build- 
ing was afterwards known as St. Pierre's French Roman Catholic 
Church, and was demolished in 1900. At this time, Easter, 1850, 
James D. Sheppard severed his more than twenty years' connection 
with the parish as organist. His letter of resignation is dated Decem- 
ber 3, 1849, to take effect at Easter. Robert Denton succeeded him 
as organist of St. Paul's, at Easter, but Mr. Sheppard sang in St. Paul's 
choir for several months after this time, and later became the organist 
of Trinity Church. 

James D. Sheppard died in 1881, aged eighty-eight years. A brass 
tablet in the present St. Paul's Church records his long service as 
organist, and the bequest which he made to the parish. (See page 293.) 

Robert Denton was the organist in Clinton Hall. Among the paid 
singers at this time appears the name of Mrs. Eager. 

In April, 1851, although the new church edifice was not yet ready 
for occupancy, the lease of Clinton Hall was given up. The organ 



326 History of St. Paul's Church. 

was removed from the hall to the basement of the rectory on Pearl 
Street, and was afterwards sold to the Presbyterian Society in Fredo- 
nia, N. Y., for $600. The members of the congregation attended 
Trinity and St. John's churches, and during the summer of 1851 the 
Rev. Dr. Shelton went abroad. 

A new organ was needed for the new church edifice, and in May, 
185 1, several persons agreed to loan the parish $2,500, for the purpose ; 
the organ was to be in place by the following October, and to be the 
property of these persons until paid for by the parish. This offer was 
accepted by the vestry. 

The new edifice was consecrated on Wednesday morning, October 
22, 1 85 1. In the description of the new church, quoted earlier in this 
volume (page 70), from the Gospel Messenger, 1851, the organ is thus 
described : " The organ (a powerful and fine-toned instrument from 
the manufactory of House & Company, Buffalo), containing thirty 
stops, is placed over the vestry, at the east end of the north aisle, and 
in front of it is a space raised one step and enclosed, for the singers." 

December 30, 1851, the vestry decided that the new organ placed 
in the church by the subscribers to the organ fund, and which cost 
$2,500, was satisfactory, and it was accepted. 

The choir in the new stone church, from 1851 to 1857, was under 
Robert Denton as organist ; from 1853, George C. Rexford sang bass 
and was director and leader of the choir, which was the first paid 
quartette in St. Paul's. Among the names of the singers we find Miss 
C. L. Case of Syracuse, soprano ; Mrs. Elizabeth A. Cross, contralto, 
to July, 1854 ; Thomas F. Thornton, tenor, from September, 1852, to 
1857 ; Miss Susan A. Boss, soprano ; Miss Amanda Allen ; in 1854, 
Miss Whiting, Miss S. Lucette House, contralto for several years ; 
Miss Emily H. Parsons, soprano, to May, 1855 ; Miss Helen S. Gillet 
sang for a few weeks in 1855, and later. Miss Deborah Scarborough 
was soprano to June, 1856 ; Miss M. R. Birge sang until 1857. 

One thousand dollars was the amount appropriated for music for 
the year beginning at Easter, 1853. 



The Music, iSiy-igoj. 327 

In March, 1855, the plan was mentioned of removing the organ 
from its position near the chancel to a gallery to be built in the west- 
erly end of the church. In 1856 this question was still under discus- 
sion. Mr. Upjohn, the architect of the church, was consulted, and 
advised against it as being injurious to the effect of the building as a 
whole. The feeling in the congregation was very strong against the 
change, and the vestry finally allowed the matter to rest for the time. 

On June 14, 1857, Robert Denton resigned as organist of St. Paul's, 
and was succeeded in the position by Everett L. Baker, on June 21, 
1857. George C. Rexford continued as director and leader of the 
choir, and Miss S. L. House continued to sing. Thomas F. Thornton 
resigned his position in the choir in 1857, being greatly occupied with 
superintending the installation of the chiming apparatus for the new 
bells of St. Paul's, and in pealing and chiming them. 

In July, 1857, Mr. Dutton of Lockport sang tenor in the choir, fol- 
lowed, in 1858, by John G. Woehnert. Miss Anna Poole sang soprano, 
and Miss S. L. House, contralto. 

In 1858 Horace F. Kenyon sang bass, Miss Martha Guild, soprano. 
Miss Julia Farr, contralto, and John G. Woehnert, tenor. Miss Guild 
left after about six months, and later the choir consisted of Miss Mag- 
gie Smith, soprano ; Mrs. George Woehnert, contralto ; John G. 
Woehnert, tenor ; H. F. Kenyon, bass. 

In July, 1859, a large majority of the vestry considered the 
removal of the organ to the west gallery as necessary ; but a number 
of the congregation were still strongly opposed to this, and six par- 
ishioners then offered to defray the expenses of the music up to 
Easter, i860, if the vestry would allow the organ to remain in its posi- 
tion adjoining the chancel. The vestry agreed to this, and it was 
decided to engage a suitable leader, who, with the organist, should 
conduct the music and lead the congregation in singing the hymns, 
etc., and Horace F. Kenyon and John G. Woehnert gave voluntary 
assistance in singing in the choir for six months, for which they 
received the thanks of the vestry in April, i860. 



328 History of St. Paul's Church. 

This experiment of " congregational singing " lasted only six 
months. Miss Anna Poole and Miss Howell sang in the choir shortly 
after this time. 

Mr. Kenyon fell ill in 1862, and S. E. Cleveland then took the 
position of bass. 

The Gospel Messenger of April 23, 1862, has the following in 
regard to music at St. Paul's : " The Easter Festival of the Sunday 
School of St. Paul's Church, on Tuesday evening, attracted a very large 
number of old and young, sufficient to test the capacity of the church 

— the scholars alone numbering nearly five hundred The 

music was the feature of the evening The choir, which is one 

of the best in the country, was assisted by many of our vocalists, the 

whole being under the direction of Everett L. Baker Mr. 

Blodgett, the organist of St. John's, relieved Mr. Baker from his duties 
as organist during the evening. The solo singers were Miss Smith, 
Miss Kimberly, Miss Hayden, Miss Ford, Miss Hollister, and Messrs. 

Tobias, Cleveland, Drake and Vining The Welcome Song was 

a beautiful improvisation, and was as unexpected as it must have been 
agreeable to Dr. Shelton, who had just returned to the city after sev- 
eral weeks' absence. It was arranged by the organist .... and 
sung by the 'Young Choir,' accompanied by one of Prince's new 
style organ melodeons, admirably played by Miss Edith Kimberly 

(afterwards Mrs. Wm. H. Walker) The chant, Passover, sung 

antiphonally, was magnificently rendered The Carol, Last and 

First, consisted of six exquisite solos, by voices in different parts of 
the church." .... The paper also speaks of Hobart Weed in con- 
nection with the singing of the "Young Choir." 

Everett L. Baker was the first organist in Buffalo to introduce the 
especially elaborate music at the Easter, Christmas, and other church 
festivals. 

The change so long agitated was finally brought about, and the 
organ and choir were removed to the gallery recently built for them at 
the westerly end of the church, at the close of the year 1863. 



The Music, i8iy-igoj. 329 

A small mixed choir was organized in 1864, and lasted four months. 
In addition to the regular quartette there were Miss Mary Hayden 
(afterwards Mrs. John B. Seymour), soprano ; Miss Julia Hayden 
(afterwards Mrs. Benjamin Hamilton), contralto ; Miss Hollister, 
Hobart Weed and Mr. Kenyon. 

The treasurer's report for the year ending at Easter, 1865, shows 
the disbursements for music to have been $1,096.19. 

At Easter, 1865, the choir was again reorganized. Miss Dellan- 
baugh (afterwards Mrs. John G. Woehnert), soprano ; Mrs. George 
Woehnert, contralto ; John G. Woehnert, tenor ; and George Woeh- 
nert, bass. 

Referring to the Christmas music at St. Paul's, the Commercial of 
December 30, 1865, speaks of Everett L. Baker as organist, and of the 
singing of Mr. and Mrs. George Woehnert, complimenting the efforts 
of " the ladies and gentlemen of the choir," but says a quartette is not 
enough to fill so large a church. The same paper also refers to a 
recent evening service at St. Paul's, when the bishop preached, and the 
choir loft was filled with singers, who sang Luther's grand old hymn, 
" Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott," with fine effect, making the arches 
ring with the music. One of the critics said, " How much better music 
— outside of the ordinary chants — sounds from a choir loft, instead 
of from the floor of the church." 

A feeling of dissatisfaction with quartette choirs would seem to have 
been somewhat general at this time. Bishop Potter of New York is 
quoted as denouncing " operatic singing " in the churches. A trial 
of boy choirs seemed to be a solution of the difficulty. 

In March, 1866, the music committee of St. Paul's decided upon 
having a double quartette choir : Miss Sarah A. Barker and Miss Sill, 
sopranos ; Mrs. George Woehnert and Miss Ella D. Barker, contraltos ; 
John Woehnert and Mr. Kimball, tenors ; George Woehnert and Mr. 
Barker, basses. Everett L. Baker, organist and director. 

The Easter, 1866, Sunday School Festival was a memorable one. 
The Sunday Schools of all the parishes in the city assembled at St. 



330 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Paul's, and over fifteen hundred children were present, each Sunday 
School marching into the church with its especial banner. Bishop 
Coxe catechised the children and preached the sermon. The Easter 
Carols were excellently given under the direction of Everett L. Baker, 
the organ being played by Robert Denton. An innovation at this serv- 
ice was the playing of one of the carol tunes upon the chimes in the 
belfry, after which the children sang the carol, Easter Bells. 

The choir of St. Paul's in 1866 was generally commended as being 
the best " the church has had for many a year," and giving very gen- 
eral satisfaction. 

In March, 1867, Everett L. Baker resigned his position at St. Paul's, 
after being organist there for ten years, and was succeeded by C. B. 
Schuyler. At the Easter Sunday School Festival in 1867, 1,600 chil- 
dren, representing the different Sunday Schools of the city, sang at St. 
Paul's. The music was spoken of as excellent. J. R. Blodgett con- 
ducted, and Mr. Schuyler presided at the organ. " Miss Sill led the 
singing in a very spirited and pleasing manner." .... The Easter 
music at St. Paul's generally gave great satisfaction, especially the 
organ playing of Mr. Schuyler, whose engagement as organist termi- 
nated on that day. He was followed by W. W. Killip from Geneseo, 
an Englishman by birth, who came highly recommended for his skill in 
drilling choirs and his understanding of church music. Mr. Killip 
was also, for a time, instructor in languages at the Heathcote School, 
then on the north side of Niagara Street, between Carolina and Vir- 
ginia streets. A quartette was engaged, but it was decided to begin 
the training of a chorus of boys. The quartette consisted of Mrs. 
William O. Brown, Jr., soprano ; Miss Alice Wells, contralto ; P. Mac- 
farlane, tenor ; Horace F. Kenyon, bass. Mr. Schuyler became the 
organist of St. John's Church. 

In May, 1867, "the experiment of a boy choir was tried in St. 
Paul's, .... and was considered successful for a first attempt. It 
will yet take some time before a cathedral service can be performed." 
This choir sang in the west organ gallery, and was not " vested." 



The Music, i8iy-ipoj. 331 

In 1867, Emil Telle sang tenor at St. Paul's ; Miss Stille was one of 
the principal singers ttiere at that time, also Miss Sarah Barker. Mrs. 
William O. Brown was re-engaged. Hobart Weed first sang tenor in 
the regular quartette, and became a member of the music committee, 
about Easter, 1867. He has continued to take an active and most 
self-denying part in the maintenance and improvement of the music 
of St. Paul's from that time to the present. 

In June, 1867, Mr. Killip left St. Paul's. Mr. Blodgett acted tem- 
porarily as organist. 

December, 1867, it was said, "The New York City Episcopal 
churches have now generally adopted the boy choir. There are eleven 
of these now — the mania is spreading." 

The Christmas, 1867, music at St. Paul's was conducted by J. R. 
Blodgett. Mrs. Brown, Mr. Telle and Mr. Kenyon sang solos. Mr. 
Kenyon had trained a chorus of boys who sang Gregorian chants, 
carols, etc., and he was much commended for his success in so short a 
time of training. 

March 25, 1868, the vestry appropriated $1,600 for music for the 
coming year, and their thanks were voted to Hobart Weed and Henry 
Bull for efficient and most acceptable work as music committee during 
the past year. It was determined to make the reputation of St. Paul's 
choir the first in the diocese. 

At Easter, 1868, S. C. Campbell, the well-known opera singer, was 
heard at St. Paul's ; Mrs. William O. Brown (Mrs. Imogene Brown) 
also sang, as a member of the choir. Lloyd's Te Deum was given by 
the quartette. " The boys under Mr. Kenyon's management were 
excellent." In the evening. Bishop Coxe preached, and the church 
was crowded, aisles and all. J. R. Blodgett was in charge of the 
Easter music. 

At this time Mrs. Imogene Brown went, for a short time, to Chicago, 
and her place at St. Paul's was filled by Miss Louise Palmer. Mrs. 
Brown returned to St. Paul's a few months later. 

After April 12, 1868, Charles H. Beare of Utica became organist 



332 History of St. Paul's Church. 

at St. Paul's. Mrs. Imogene Brown, soprano, and Miss Alice Wells, 
contralto, were retained. Mr. Telle resigned, also Mr. Kenyon. It 
was decided to have the quartette and a boy choir, as usual. 

In May, 1868, Mr. Beare was obliged, on account of ill health, to 
give up his duties for a time, and Mr. Schuyler was engaged as organ- 
ist for three months. In July, 1868, Mr. Beare being no better, 
resigned as organist, and in July, 1869, he died, aged twenty-eight 
years. During the short time his health permitted him to play he gave 
entire satisfaction. On the resignation of Mr. Beare in July, 1868, J. 
R. Blodgett was appointed organist, and Mr. Kenyon continued as 
conductor and teacher of the boy choir. 

Mr. Cooper, " a tenor from Utica," sang at this time at St. Paul's ; 
Miss Anna Mischka sang soprano, followed in September by Miss Pit- 
kin of Buffalo, afterwards Mrs. John V. Tifft. 

At Christmas, 1868, the music was conducted by J. R. Blodgett. 
Alfred H. Pease directed the rendition of his Bonuvi Est. Solos were 
sung by Mrs. Imogene Brown and Miss Wells, and at the close of the 
service the boy choir sang " Hark, the Herald Angels Sing." 

Early in 1869, Mrs. Imogene Brown left St. Paul's choir, going 
later to New York City, where she sang with great success at Christ 
Church, St. Bartholomew's and other New York churches, command- 
ing large salaries and being much appreciated. Mrs. Brown's sweet 
voice and exquisitely clear enunciation are held in grateful remem- 
brance by those who were fortunate enough to hear her. Many more 
recent singers seem to forget that the stately and beautiful liturgy of 
the church is intended to be plainly " understanded of the people." 
In some of the modern choral services, highly praised by musical 
critics, the words of the service are quite unintelligible. 

At Easter, 1869, Mr. Van Vliet, formerly of St. Peter's Church, 
Rochester, became organist of St. Paul's. Mr. Yerkes, bass ; Miss 
Wells, contralto ; John G.Woehnert, tenor. " The boys will be retained 
and retrained, and a volunteer chorus choir formed in addition to the 
paid quartette." Miss Reynolds sang soprano, followed in May by 



The Music, i8ij-ipoj. 333 

Miss Joyce. In July, 1869, Mr. Van Vliet was obliged to resign on 
account of ill health, and during the summer his place was temporarily 
filled by Mr. Witherspoon and Mr. Whitney of Burlington. The 
Christmas, 1869, music was under the charge of Charles W. Sykes as 
organist and director. There was a chorus in addition to the regular 
quartette. 

On January 9, 1870, the new organist at St. Paul's, H. G. Gilmore, 
took charge, with a choir exclusively of men and boys, the boys paid, 
the men mostly volunteer. At Easter, 1870 (April 17th), the new male 
choir sang for the first time, consisting of thirty boys and twelve men, 
including Doctors H. R. Hopkins, M. B. Folwell, G. C. Daboll, and 
Messrs. George J. Sicard, Hobart Weed, Edward C. Walker, Richard 
R. Cornell and others. This choir was not "vested," and sang in the 
west gallery. The Commercial sajs : "The attendance at St. Paul's on 
Easter was immense — many turned away ; the boys were inclined to 
shout too much, but the music generally was very good." September 
I, 1870, H. G. Gilmore resigned as organist, and was succeeded imme- 
diately by Lucien G. Chaffin, M. A., formerly an instructor at Hobart 
College. Mr. Chaffin was an able musician, and was also, in 1870-71, 
instructor in Latin, Greek and German, and from September, 1871, to 
August, 1874, head master of the Heathcote School, Buffalo. 

At this time the keyboard of the organ was reversed, so that the 
organist could sit with his back to the organ and face towards the 
chancel end of the church. 

The Christmas, 1870, music was rendered by the choir of men and 
boys, under the direction of L. G. Chaffin, organist, as was that of 
Easter, 1871, and was much commended. Later in April it was decided 
to retain twelve of the boys and to add six or more mixed voices. 

In January, 1871, a quartette was formed at St. Luke's Church, 
consisting almost entirely of former members of St. Paul's choir : 
Miss Forsyth, soprano ; Miss Wells, contralto ; Hobart Weed, tenor ; and 
F. W. Fiske, bass. Mr. Fiske was shortly followed by George J. 
Sicard. Joseph Mischka was organist at St. Luke's. 



334 History of St. Paul's Church. 

In May, 187 1, Mr. Chaffin resigned from St. Paul's. He was suc- 
ceeded by William Kaffenberger, the choir consisting of a quartette : 
Miss Anna Mischka, soprano ; Mrs. W. A. Sheldon (formerly Miss 
Julia Sweet), contralto ; F. W. Bindemann, tenor ; and A. B. Kellogg, 
bass. The Commercial says : " The chorus choir and boys .have scat- 
tered like chaff in a high wind." The Commercial's musical notes 
state that from July 21, 1871, the choir of St. Luke's alternated with 
that of St. Paul's at the two churches, until October ist. 

During the summer of 1871, Miss Clute, afterwards Mrs. Seiden- 
striker, took Miss Anna Mischka's place in the choir. Miss Mischka 
returning (as Mrs. Blackmar) in November. 

At Christmas, 1871, the quartette at St. Paul's was as follows: 
Mrs. Blackmar (formerly Miss Anna Mischka), soprano ; Miss Emily 
Mischka, contralto ; F. W. Bindemann, tenor ; A. B. Kellogg, bass ; 
William Kaffenberger, organist. 

At Easter, 1S72, Miss Edith Wheaton was soprano, and Mrs. Scho- 
field (formerly Miss S. L. House) contralto. In January, 1872, Mr. 
Chafifin became organist at St. Luke's, but immediately after Easter, 
1872, he returned to St. Paul's, succeeding Mr. Kaffenberger as organ- 
ist. The quartette at St. Luke's disbanded. Miss Alice Wells came 
back to St. Paul's, as did Mr. Weed, who, with Dr. Daboll, sang tenor, 
with C. M. Curtiss as bass. Later, in April, Miss Lizzie Forsyth 
became soprano at St. Paul's. In May, 1872, at Whitsunday, a chorus 
choir was added to the regular quartette, consisting, among others, of 
Mrs. Daboll, Miss Kimberly, Miss Cowden, Mrs. A. R. Davidson, 
Miss Persch, Miss Bessie Coxe, Dr. G. C. Daboll, Dr. Hopkins, Mr. 
Woodworth, E. C. Walker, Robert Palen, Richard R. Cornell and 
others. This was the beginning of the famous chorus choir, which 
was at once organized into a choral society. A note on the pro- 
grammes at this time says : " Those having good voices and ability to 
read plain music fairly, and desirous of entering the choir, are invited 
to address St. Paul's Cathedral Choir." 

This chorus choir became very popular among the younger mem- 



The Music, i8iy-i()oj. 335 

bers of the congregation, and the list includes the names of sons and 
daughters of many of the principal families in the church. The choir 
was entertained socially at the homes of prominent parishioners, and 
from time to time concerts were arranged in Buffalo and in neighbor- 
ing towns, at which the choir sang for the benefit of struggling par- 
ishes. The constant practice required and given resulted in the 
marked proficiency of the organization as a whole, and in valuable 
musical training for the individual members. Among the names in 
the large chorus choir in i873-'74-'7S, etc., were : Mrs. G. C. Daboll, 
Mrs. John B. Seymour, Mrs. R. Kendrick, Mrs. George Coit, Mrs. A. 
R. Davidson, the Misses Emelie Flach (afterwards Mrs. Leonard 
Dodge). Serene Kibbe, Addie Cowden, Kate C. Remington (after- 
wards Mrs. James Nuno), Isabella P. Keene, Minnie Smith, Hattie Lay, 
Alice C. JBarton, Rebecca Jones, Bessie Cleveland Coxe, Sara Reming- 
ton, Minnie Atwater (Mrs. Lyman), Isadore Spencer, Minnie Mixer, 
Lucia Welch, Nellie Sage, Gertrude Sidway (afterwards Mrs. Chaffin), 
Bessie Bird, Mary Cleveland Coxe, Julia Atwater, Asenath C. Holmes, 
Leonora Godwin, Kittie Thompson, Emma Burtis, Lillie Lyman, and 
Dr. Daboll, Edward C Walker, Robert Palen, Dr. Charles Gary, 
Trumbull Gary, William Woltge, Dr. H. R. Hopkins, C. K. Remington, 
Frank W. Fiske, Stanley B. Cowing, Robert Codd and many others. 

Except at church festivals, the chorus choir sang at the Sunday 
morning services only ; at the evening services the music was gener- 
ally rendered by a double quartette. 

Numerous churches in Buffalo and in neighboring towns have prof- 
ited by the fine musical instruction given at St. Paul's, many of the 
singers so trained being able later to take prominent positions in other 
choirs. 

Mrs. Kendrick was a soloist for a short time, in June and Jujy, 1872. 

In November, 1872, Hobart Weed, for the music committee, 
reported to the vestry that the organ, which had been in use for 
twenty-one years, was in bad condition and that a new one was required. 
It was decided to raise funds by subscripton for a new organ. 



336 History of St. Paul's Church. 

At Christmas, 1872, in addition to tlie regular quartette, a mixed 
chorus of thirty voices rendered the music, under the direction of the 
organist, L. G. Chaffin. A harp was also introduced. 

Commenting on the Easter, 1873, music at St. Paul's, the Commer- 
cial says : " The Easter music at St. Paul's was more important than 

ever before Sir Henry Smart's Te Deum was sung. A more 

powerful organ is needed for so large a chorus, and one is to be forth- 
coming. Immense congregation at Easter." .... 

In April, 1873, the vestry returned their thanks to Hobart Weed 
and Dr. G. C. Daboll for their services on the music committee, and 
$1,700 was appropriated to pay for the music for the coming year. 
William H. Walker and Howard H. Baker, from the organ committee, 
reported that they had obtained subscriptions from forty-five members 
of the congregation, amounting to $6,555, ^"^ that a contract had 
been made with E. & G. G. Hook & Hastings of Boston for a new 
organ, to cost $7,500, to be in place by September i, 1873. The 
Buffalo Courier of September 12, 1873, gives a full description of the 
new organ at St. Paul's, " now being put up in the church." It was 
known as size No. 20, with three manuals, and there were 2,196 pipes. 
The organ was as modern in construction and equipment as could be 
made at the time. The design was in harmony with the architecture 
of the church ; the case was twenty-two feet in height and nineteen 
feet four inches in width, and twelve feet six inches in depth, the 
highest of the displayed pipes rising ten feet above the case. The 
same paper further says : " The choir has been enlarged to about forty 
voices, and, although not quite complete, has already secured much of 
the best local talent of the city." 

After Easter, 1873, Miss Alice Wells, the contralto singer, went to 
New York, but Miss Forsyth continued as soprano until September ist, 
when she went abroad, and some years later, became the wife 
of Signer Hugo Augier. Miss Ella P. Conger became the con- 
tralto singer in April, 1873, Miss Lottie Snow of Warsaw substituting 
for her until June, 1873, Miss Belle Brown of Lockport sang soprano 



The Music, iSiy-igoj. 337 

in September and October ; and after November ist Miss Frances Dav- 
enport of Geneva became soprano, but could sing only one Sunday on 
account of illness. Miss Davenport never regained her health, and 
died not long afterwards. Mrs George Coit kindly consented to take 
her place in the quartette, and sang until January, 1874, when Mrs. G. 
F. Staylin of Worcester, Mass., became the solo soprano at St. Paul's. 

In 1873, Hobart Weed and Dr. G. C. Daboll constituted the music 
committee, and at Easter, 1874, in their report to the vestry, they said : 
" Mr. E. C. Walker is entitled to great credit for the interest taken in 
the choir ; we ask you to associate him with us on the music commit- 
tee." This was accordingly done. In July, 1873, one of the Buffalo 
papers says : " At morning service to-morrow .... will be ren- 
dered the Inflammatus, solo and chorus from the Stabat Mater. This 

is the last singing of the chorus choir until September The 

success of the choir since its formation has been beyond all expectation, 
and the music rendered has been of a truly cathedral character." . . . 

The Commercial of October 4, 1873, says : " Hook's workmen have 
finished St. Paul's organ." .... 

Ex-President Millard Fillmore died March 8, 1874, and on March 
12th were held the funeral services at St. Paul's. Mrs. Staylin being 
ill and Miss Conger away, the choir was composed of Miss Christine 
Dossert, soprano ; Miss Rose Anderson, contralto ; Mr. Curtiss and 
Mr. Weed, and the chorus choir. The service was very beautiful and 
impressive, and a muffled peal was rung on the bells. Miss Dossert 
took Mrs. Staylin's place for some weeks, at this time. 

In April, 1B74, the appropriation for church music for the coming 
year was $1,800, and the same amount was appropriated in 1876. The 
choir at Easter, 1874 (April 5th), was : Mrs. Staylin, Miss Ella P. Con- 
ger, C. M. Curtiss, Hobart Weed, and a mixed chorus of fifty-one 
voices, all under the direction of Mr. Chafifin. "The Heavens are 
Telling" was rendered with great power and effect, and Mrs. Staylin 
sang Handel's " I know that my Redeemer liveth." Miss Conger 
remained at St. Paul's until the last Sunday in May, 1874, when she 



338 History of St. Paul's Church. 

resigned, to the regret of the congregation and choir. She afterwards 
became Mrs. Charles W. Goodyear. Miss Rose Anderson was engaged 
as solo contralto, June i, 1874, and the chorus choir sang, as usual, 
until July. 

Mr. Chafifin resigned his position in the Heathcote School, in 
August, 1874, and went to New York City, returning to Buffalo three 
weeks later, and resuming his position as organist at St. Paul's. Dur- 
ing his absence his place was temporarily filled by Mr. Peabody. Mrs. 
Staylin left St. Paul's in September, 1874, becoming soprano at St. 
John's ; her place at St. Paul's was temporarily filled by Miss Jennie 
H. Thompson of Lockport, beginning in October. The Christmas, 
1874, music was rendered by Miss Thompson, Miss Rose Anderson, 
Mr. Curtiss, Mr. Weed, and a mixed chorus of fifty voices. Mr. Chaf- 
fin was organist. A part of Wahle's orchestra assisted the chorus 
under the direction of Signer Nuno. The programme included the 
Hallelujah Chorus from the Messiah, Berthold Tour's Te Beum, and 
the anthem, " Lo, the Angel of the Lord," from the Messiah, all given 
with orchestra accompaniment. 

This was probably the first time an orchestra was ever heard in St. 
Paul's. 

Late in 1874, Dr. Daboll left St. Paul's to take charge of musical 
affairs at the Church of the Ascension. 

For the three months preceding Easter, 1875, Mrs. George Coit 
took the place of leading soprano, singing also in the quartette at the 
Easter service, March 28th, the other leading singers being the same 
as at Christmas. They were assisted by a mixed chorus of forty-eight 
voices. At this time, Easter, 1875, was sung Sullivan's Festival Te 
Deum, written in commemoration of the recovery of the Prince of 
Wales. As rendered by St. Paul's choir, it was compiled from the 
original and arranged for the organ by Mr. Chaffin, and the orchestral 
parts for eight pieces were written by Signor James Nuno. The 
necessary condensation was most skilfully done. The original score 
of this famous Te Deum of seventy-six pages (about one-half of which 



The Music, i8iy-igoj. 339 

was given by St. Paul's choir), was written for a great chorus, full 
orchestra, military band and organ, and was first rendered at the festi- 
val held at the Crystal Palace at Sydenham, near London, May i, 1872. 
On December 20, 1875, the distinguished composer having learned of 
the performance of the Te Deum by St. Paul's choir, and of how 
greatly it was admired in Buffalo, wrote a cordial letter of appreciation, 
which was published in the Buffalo Courier of January 13, 1876. 

The Commercial oi March 29, 1875, says : "The performance of 
the Sullivan Te Deum (at St. Paul's) left nothing to be desired." Mr. 
Chafifin was organist and director, and Signer Nuno conducted the Te 
Deum, and Handel's Hallelujah Chorus, which was given with great 
spirit and effect. At the evening service, the grand Gloria from 
Mozart's Twelfth Mass was sung. All were given with orchestra and 
organ. The church was crowded at both services. 

In May, 1875, Miss Emma L. Underhill of Bath became solo 
soprano, the rest of the quartette remaining unchanged. Louis H. 
Plogsted was engaged as cornet soloist in October, 1875. 

At Christmas, 1875, at St. Paul's, Gounod's Sanctus was sung ; 
and " Praise the Lord," from Spohr's Last Judgment, was given at 
the Christmas Eve and Christmas morning services, with orchestra. 
Sullivan's Festival Te Deum was repeated, and received great commen- 
dation from the musical critics. A chorus of fifty assisted the regular 
quartette, and Mr. Chaffin and Signor Nuno conducted. 

At the informal opening of the new City Hall, on Friday evening, 
March 10, 1876, St. Paul's chorus choir was present by special request, 
and rendered the music for the occasion, singing "To thee, oh Coun- 
try," " My Country, 'tis of thee," and the Doxology. 

At Easter, 1876 (April i6th), the same quartette with a mixed 
chorus of fifty voices sang, with orchestra. The Commercial said : 
" The music at St. Paul's was very fine." Gounod's Te Deum was 
sung, also Berthold Tour's anthem, " Blessing, Glory, Wisdom," both 
with orchestra. Mr. Chaffin's Gloria in Excelsis was also given with 
orchestra — "it is a really fine composition." At the evening service, 



340 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Gounod's Sanctus, from the St. Cecilia Mass, was sung with orchestra, and 
-Mrs. George Coit sang, by request, " I know that my Redeemer liveth." 

On July 4, 1876 — the centennial year — a special service, arranged 
by Bishop Coxe, was held at St. Paul's at 9.00 A. M. The bishop and 
ten of the clergy, with Dr. Shelton as dean, were met at the door by 
the vestry, and the service began with the singing of the " Non nobis 
Domine " (Psalm cxv.) as a processional. Gounod's Te Deum was sung 
by the large chorus choir, accompanied by the organ and the 74th Regi- 
ment Band, which rendered a stately voluntary, introducing " Ein' feste 
Burg ist unser Gott." The service was majestic and impressive through- 
out. The Commercial of Julys, 1876, in its report, said : "Those 
who bore a part in this solemnity will find pleasure in speaking of it 
in after years, as a truly historic event, and worthy of imitation here- 
after, on all great occasions of public thanksgiving, .... and 
as the Church thus lent her ancient offices to the sanctifying of a 
grand national event, we could not but reflect upon the sublime asso- 
ciations of such a service. Henry V., after Agincourt, is made to say : 
' Do we all holy rites ; 

Let there be sung Non Nobis and Te Deum.' " . . . . 

At Christmas, 1876, the music was rendered by the same quartette, 
the mixed chorus of forty-nine voices, and the Germania Band orches- 
tra, under Signer Nunc, with Lucien G. Chaffin as organist and Louis 
H. Plogsted, cornetist. Among other selections, Handel's Hallelujah 
Chorus was given. A few days later, in the night of December 29, 
1876, occurred the appalling railroad disaster at Ashtabula, Ohio, in 
which many lives were lost ; and among the killed was Miss Minnie 
Mixer, the only daughter of Dr. and Mrs. S. F. Mixer, and for several 
years one of the most popular members of St. Paul's chorus choir. A 
very lovely and gifted young girl, her sudden death came as a personal 
blow to the community. A memorial service for her was held at Trinity 
Church, and a similar service was held at St. Paul's in memory of Miss 
Mixer and two other victims of the terrible disaster, John S. Pickering 
and Louis J. Barnard, a brother of Col. A. J. Barnard of St. Paul's vestry. 



The Music, 1817-igoj. 341 

In February, 1877, permission was given by the vestry to the Rev. 
S. H. Gurteen to extend the organ loft four feet forward, and also to 
place a chancel organ over the vestry room in the space occupied by 
the old organ prior to its removal in 1863 to the west gallery. This 
new organ cost about $1,200, and was first used at Easter, 1877. At 
this time the carved black walnut reredos, newly illuminated in gold 
and colors, was unveiled. There was an immense attendance at the 
Easter services. The two organs were used, and the music was ren- 
dered by the same quartette (except that Mr. Curtiss was ill, and 
Edward C. Walker took his place as bass), and a chorus of fifty-one 
voices, with a small orchestra. L. G. Chaffin, the organist, was assisted 
by Paul Henrich, and L. H. Plogsted was the solo cornetist and leader 
of St. Paul's Cathedral orchestra. Randegger's anthem from the 
iSoth Psalm was splendidly sung, as was Dudley Buck's Te Deum. 
The new chancel organ was used with fine effect in Rimbault's Jubi- 
late Deo. The Doxology at the end of the sermon was also accom- 
panied by both organs. 

April 16, 1877, the thanks of the vestry were extended to "the 
music committee, chorus choir, and all who have aided them, for the 
unexcelled music for the past year." In June, shortly before the 
chorus choir disbanded for the summer, Mrs. Imogene Brown sang the 
solo in the Inflammatus at St. Paul's. F. C. M. Lautz first sang in 
St. Paul's about June, 1877, and continued as baritone soloist 
for thirteen years. In September, 1877, Miss Underbill left for 
Europe, and Miss A. L. Hodges sang soprano until April i, 1878, 
when Miss Carrie Butterfield became the solo soprano, just before 
Easter. Charles M. Curtiss, for several years the efficient basso of the 
quartette, was ill and unable to sing at Easter, 1877, and his death, at 
the age of twenty-eight years, took place on June 4, 1877. 

At Christmas, 1877, F. C. M. Lautz was the baritone soloist and 
Edward C. Walker sang bass in the quartette, with Hobart Weed as 
tenor. Mr. Walker and Mr. Weed gave their services for many years. 
The chorus at Christmas consisted of fifty-five men and women. 



342 History of St. Paul's Church. 

January i, 1878, Lucien G. Chaffin left St. Paul's, becoming organ- 
ist at St. John's, and later going to New York City. He was succeeded 
at St. Paul's, for a few weeks only, by Dr. James Peck of New York ; 
and John H. Norman then became organist. 

March 30, 1878, the vestry authorized the Rev. S. H. Gurteen to 
organize a full choral service for St. Paul's, to be used for the Sunday 
vesper service, and also to make such alterations in the chancel as he 
should deem necessary for this purpose At Easter, 1878 (April 21st), 
the music was under the direction of John H. Norman, with George 
W. Fargo as assistant organist, and Louis H. Plogsted as solo cornet- 
ist and leader of St. Paul's Cathedral orchestra. The singing was 
by the quartette, Miss Butterfield, Miss Anderson, Messrs. Weed 
and Walker, and a mixed chorus of, fifty-six voices, with F. C. M. 
Lautz as baritone soloist. Miss Lilian B. Norton of Boston was the 
special soloist at St. Paul's at Easter, 1878. Miss Norton, in 1879, 
took the stage name of Giglio Nordica — northern lily — and later 
became the famous prima donna, known as Madame Nordica. In the 
afternoon, the choral vesper service was held, the first vested choir in 
St. Paul's rendering the music. 

At Christmas, 1878, the regular quartette, with a mixed chorus of 
thirty-six, sang, the organist being John H. Norman. Mr. Norman 
left St. Paul's immediately after Christmas, and Friedrich Federlein sub- 
stituted for a few weeks. Miss N. T. Roesser also sang from July, 
1878, to April, 1879. Miss Welch sang in January, 1879. 

In January, 1879, Gerrit Smith became the regular organist. The 
quartette consisted of Miss Butterfield, soprano ; Miss Anderson, con- 
tralto ; F. C. M. Lautz, solo baritone ; Hobart Weed, tenor ; and Ed- 
ward C. Walker, bass ; Mr. Weed and Mr. Walker gave their services. 
At Easter, 1879, a mixed chorus of forty voices assisted the quartette, 
and an orchestra of twelve pieces, under Plogsted, helped to render 
the music. Gerrit Smith was organist and director and George W. 
Fargo, assistant organist. Plogsted's Te Deuiu, especially written for 
this occasion, was sung. In the afternoon, the vested choir of thirty- 



The Music, iSij-igoj. 343 

two men and boys, under Robert Palen, precentor, sang the choral ves- 
per service, one of the features of which was the singing of the 
Doxology, accompanied by the gallery and chancel organs and the 
brass instruments of the orchestra. "The music was superbly ren- 
dered and the church was crowded," 

The music committee for 1879 — appointed in April — consisted of 
L. C. Woodruff, Hobart Weed, Edward C. Walker, M. B. Moore and 
T. Guilford Smith. May 12, 1879, the vestry appropriated $1,500 for 
the music. At Christmas, 1879, the chorus choir had become greatly 
reduced in size, being composed of four sopranos, three contraltos, four 
tenors, and four basses. There was an orchestra of ten pieces under 
Plogsted. The afternoon vesper service was sung by the vested choir 
of twenty boys and sixteen men under Allen G. Bigelow as precentor. 
Gerrit Smith was the organist and choir-master. 

Miss Anderson resigned, to take effect January i, 1880. Edward 
C. Walker and Hobart Weed resigned at this time, receiving the 
thanks of the vestry for their long-continued, voluntary service in the 
choir. The choir was reorganized, and the entire muscial control 
placed in the hands of the organist, Gerrit Smith. 

At Easter, 1880, March 28th, there was no quartette. Miss Butter- 
field was the solo soprano and there was a mixed chorus of thirty-four 
voices, conducted by Carl Adam. Gerrit Smith was the organist and 
director, and George W. Fargo the assistant organist. Goss's Te 
Deum, "composed on the occasion of Her Majesty's Thanksgiving, 
at St. Paul's Cathedral, London," was sung. At the vesper service, the 
vested choir of thirty-eight men and boys sang, with Allen G. Bigelow 
and Robert Palen as precentors. 

The Rev. S. H. Gurteen left St. Paul's in April, 1880... Mr. Smith, 
the organist, resigned, and was succeeded in the position by Joseph 
Mischka. Miss Butterfield resigned, and shortly after became Mrs. 
Gerrit Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Smith going later to New York. 

The music committee after Easter, 1880, consisted of Howard H. 
Baker, A. J. Barnard, Henry R. Howland, Hobart Weed and Edward 



344 History of St. Paul's Church. 

C. Walker. At the beginning of their term of office they found the 
church practically without an organist or choir. Joseph Mischka was 
engaged as organist the first Sunday after Easter, 1880, Miss Pauline 
Bonney as leading soprano, Miss Ida Hornung as contralto, and Adam 
Lautz, tenor. A volunteer chorus was secured by Mr. Mischka. 
Allen G. Bigelow continued to drill and conduct the boy choir, and 
under the supervision of Mr. Bigelow and Mr. Mischka the choir 
steadily improved and the afternoon choral services attracted large 
congregations each Sunday. 

In September, 1880, it was resolved by the vestry that the interests 
of the church and the Sunday School required the efficient mainte- 
nance of a full choral service on Sunday afternoon. 

At Christmas, 1880, an orchestra, under Louis Plogsted, assisted 
the double quartette and mixed chorus of thirty-two voices. Miss 
Marie Schelle sang on Christmas Eve and Christmas morning. The 
choral service was sung in the afternoon of Sunday (the next day) by 
the vested choir of thirty-six men and boys, under Allen G. Bigelow and 
Robert Palen as precentors. Joseph Mischka was organist and director. 

On January 11, 1881, the Rev. Dr. Shelton resigned as rector, and 
was made honorary rector. Miss Getheford sang to January 30, 1881. 

At Easter, 1881, the chorus of thirty- four voices and quartette, 
conducted by Signer Nuno, sang, and Joseph Mischka was organist 
and director. Miss Schelle was the solo soprano and F. C. M. Lautz 
the solo baritone. The quartette was Miss Ida A. Snyder, soprano ; 
Mrs. R. H. Heussler (formerly Miss Ida Hornung), contralto ; Adam 
Lautz, tenor ; and Edward C. Walker, bass. In the afternoon, the 
vested choir rendered the choral service, under Allen G. Bigelow and 
Robert Palen as precentors. N. P. Curtice sang tenor in the quartette 
about June 25, 1881. Miss C. E. Sears sang in September, 1881. 

October i, 1881, Hobart Weed was elected chairman of the music 
committee in place of Edward C. Walker, resigned. The vestry 
resolved a vote of thanks to Mr. Walker " for his unceasing and untir- 
ing efforts to advance and sustain the music of St. Paul's Church." 



The Music, i8iy-igoj. 345 

In December, 1881, the vestry agreed to have built a raised plat- 
form, extending the chancel floor into the nave, in order to accommo- 
date the vested choir. This work was done early in 1882. 

At Christmas, 1881, Miss Snyder was soprano ; Miss Annie F. La 
Mont, contralto ; N. P. Curtice, tenor ; and E. C. Walker, bass ; F. 
C. M. Lautz was solo baritone. There was a mixed chorus of thirty- 
one voices. Signor Nuno's Te Deum and Jubilate Deo, and the Handel 
Hallelujah Chorus were sung at the morning service. Even-song was 
rendered by the vested choir of about forty-five voices. Joseph 
Mischka, organist and director ; Hobart Weed, director of vested choir ; 
and Robert Palen, precentor. Louis H. Plogsted, leader of orchestra. 

At Easter, 1882, Joseph Mischka was organist, and there was a 
quartette and chorus of thirty-two voices. The quartette was the 
same as at Christmas, 1881, except that F. P. Turner had become the 
tenor. Hobart Weed frequently gave his services as tenor in the 
quartettes during these years. The afternoon vesper service was sung 
by the vested choir of thirty-six men and boys, with Robert Palen as 
precentor. 

In May, 1882, the Rev. John W. Brown, D. D., became rector of St. 
Paul's. Dr. Brown had strong musical likings, and had made a deep 
and long-continued study of church music especially, and under his 
fostering care the musical portions of the services at St. Paul's steadily 
improved. In June, 1882, the vestry appropriated $2,500 for the 
music for the coming year. 

Beginning in 1882, Mrs. Henry W. Burt, being appointed by 
Dr. Brown, voluntarily looked after the welfare of the boys in the 
choir. She visited them in sickness, taught them the service, invited 
them to her home, accompanied them on their summer outings, be- 
friended them in every way, and gained the obedience and love of 
every boy in the choir. Her valuable assistance was much appreci- 
ated by Mr. Mischka, the organist. Mrs. Burt continued this self- 
denying work until about the year 1890, at which time Mr. Gilbert was 
the organist. Miss Mary Levering succeeded Mrs. Burt. 



346 History of St. Paul's Church. 

The Christmas Eve, 1882, music at St. Paul's, on Sunday afternoon 
(Christmas Eve) was rendered by the vested choir of men and boys, 
assisted by a quartette of brass instruments ; and on Monday morning, 
Christmas Day, the full chorus choir sang, with the organ and an 
orchestra of ten pieces. Joseph Mischka was organist and director, 
and William Kaffenberger assistant organist. The Christmas Eve 
service was attended by an immense congregation, and " the music was 
magnificently rendered," as was also that on Christmas Day. 

At Easter, 1883, both services were sung by the vested choir of 
forty-nine men and boys. Simon Fleischmann assisted Joseph Mischka 
as organist, and Hobart Weed was director of the vested choir. Robert 
Tolmie was the solo cornetist. There was no quartette or mixed cho- 
rus at Easter, 1883. In March, 1883, Hobart Weed, Edward C. Walker 
and Dr. Henry R. Hopkins were appointed the music committee. 
After Easter, 1883, Miss Ella Wirt of Albion became the solo 
soprano. 

For some years after Easter, 1883, no authorized published pro- 
grammes of the music rendered at the great festivals of the church 
appear to have been issued by St. Paul's. This makes it especially 
difficult to follow the personnel of the various choirs, as the news- 
paper accounts are most fragmentary, and often incorrect, and there 
are practically no other records which are accessible. This change 
in regard to the publication of musical programmes, quite generally 
adopted throughout the diocese, at this time, appears to have had its 
inception among the clergy of Rochester, N. Y. It was thought that 
the extent to which the advertising of the music had been at times 
carried encouraged a wrong motive for church going, affected the 
character of the music itself, and made it unduly prominent. Miss 
Wirt sang to May i, 1883 ; also Miss L. C. Welch and Mrs. Jesse 
Peterson, in May and June. 

In June, 1883, there was a chorus choir of about twenty men and 
women, most of whom were paid. Among the names are found Miss 
Julia Strasmer, Mrs. Archibald, Miss Inman, Miss Augusta Mischka, 



The Music, iSiy-igoj. 347 

Simon Fleischmann, George T. Moseley, F. P. Turner, Miss Blanche 
Smith and others. This choir continued, with some changes, to 1885, 
at the morning services. 

On October 11, 1883, occurred the death of the venerable and 
beloved honorary rector of the parish, the Rev. William Shelton, D. D., 
in the eighty-sixth year of his age. On October isth, his funeral was 
held in the church where he had for so many years been rector. An 
immense congregation filled the building, and many were unable to 
gain admittance. The bells which he had loved were tolled. The 
music was rendered with impressive effect by a full chorus choir in the 
organ loft, and the vested choir of fifty-two boys and twelve men in 
the chancel, accompanied by both organs. Mrs. Wells B. Tanner sang 
" I know that my Redeemer liveth." After the prayers that followed, 
" Nearer, My God, to Thee " was sung, Mrs. Tanner singing the first 
verse, then the chorus and surpliced choir, first alternating and then 
together. In 1883, rooms for the vested choir were built in the basement. 

At Christmas, 1883. Mrs. Jesse Peterson and Miss Clara Barnes 
sang solos, and carols were given by the boy choir ; Joseph Mischka 
was organist and director, and there was an orchestra of ten pieces. 
Plogsted's Te Deum and anthem were sung. Simon Fleischmann was 
assistant organist. In February, 1884, Mrs. T. P. Vaille became the 
solo soprano. At Easter, 1884 (April 13th), Sullivan's Festival Te 
Deum was sung, with quartette, consisting of Mrs. T. P. Vaille, 
soprano ; Mrs. R. H. Heussler, contralto ; Hobart Weed and Edward 
C. Walker. F. C. M. Lautz, baritone soloist. A chorus choir of forty 
also assisted, including many well-known singers. Joseph Mischka 
was conductor and organist, with Simon Fleischmann as first assistant 
and Miss Bianca Fleischmann as second assistant organist. R. J. Tol- 
mie was the cornetist, and L. H. Plogsted was the leader of the 
orchestra. The vested choir sang the vesper service at 4.00 P. M. 
The church was crowded to its utmost capacity at both services, and 
the music was enthusiastically praised by the critics. " The Easter 
service of song was pre-eminently successful in every way." 



348 History of St. Paul's Church. 

In May, 1884, the new music committee was Hobart Weed, Ed- 
ward C. Walker, Dr. H. R. Hopkins, A. J. Barnard and James R. 
Smith. The same committee also served in 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888. 
In May, 1889, Edmund Hayes was added to the committee. 

At Christmas, 1884, the music was rendered by a quartette, chorus, 
and vested choir, and Plogsted's orchestra of ten pieces, and " was of 
a high order of excellence. Mr. Mischka conducted, and Mr. Kaffen- 
berger was assistant organist. The singing of the boy choir was a 
beautiful feature." The solos were by Mrs. Vaille, Mi.ss Elliott, Mr. 
Lautz. J. H. Williams and E. C. Walker. During 1884, Miss Julia 
Strasmer, Mrs. Jesse Peterson, Miss Seaman and Mrs. Heussler sang. 

At the morning service at Easter, 1885 (April 5th), Sullivan's Te 
Deum and Gounod's Sanctus were rendered, the singing of Mrs. Vaille 
and F. C. M. Lautz being especially commended. Plogsted's orchestra 
of ten pieces assisted, Mr. Mischka conducted, and Andrew T. Webster 
was assistant organist. Mr. Webster had just been appointed organist 
at the First Presbyterian Church for the ensuing year. The boys sang 
at the offertory, and also at the early celebration of the Holy Com- 
munion, which was a choral service ; the usual afternoon choral serv- 
ice was also held. 

At the Christmas, 1885, services, there was a full chorus and orches- 
tra, and a quartette. Miss Grace Wadsworth sang, also Mrs. William 
N. McCredie and F. C. M. Lautz. Mr. Kaffenberger was assistant 
organist, and Mr. Mischka conducted. 

In March, 1886, Mrs. Fredericks was engaged as contralto at St. 
Paul's. Miss Gussie H. Sears sang soprano from March, 1886, to 
October ist. 

At Easter, April 25, 1886, the organ, quartette, and chorus of fifty 
were assisted by Plogsted's orchestra of eleven pieces. The quartette 
was Miss Sears, soprano ; Miss Grace Wadsworth, Messrs. Weed and 
Walker. Mrs. Crosby Adams played the organ and Joseph Mischka 
conducted. At Easter, 1886, the trio, "Lift thine eyes," from Elijah, 
was sung by three of the boys of the choir, Bert Smith, J. Clark Mil- 



The Music, iSiy-igoj. 349 

som, and Allan Farr, and was considered so remarkable a performance 
for boys that they were requested to repeat it at a public concert given 
by the Buffalo Liedertafel. Among the boy sopranos in the vested 
choir at this time was Percy Lapey, now a well-known local singer. In 
May, 1886, the vestry voted their "warmest thanks to Messrs. Hobart 
Weed and Edward C. Walker." On Sunday evening, May 29, 1886, a 
special and notable choral service was held at St. Paul's for the officers 
and men of the 65th Regiment, of which the Rev. Dr. Brown was 
chaplain. The service was an elaborate one, and the regimental band 
assisted. 

At Christmas, 1886, the chancel choir of forty boys and twelve men 
sang at the choral celebration of the Holy Communion at midnight on 
Christmas Eve. On Christmas day, the mixed chorus, of forty ren- 
dered the music, assisted by Plogsted's orchestra. Mrs. McCready, 
soprano ; Mrs. Fredericks, contralto ; Messrs. Weed and Walker, and 
F. C. M. Lautz. Baumbach's Te Deum was sung. 

At Easter, April 10, 1887, Plogsted's Te Deum was given. There 
was an excellent quartette and chorus choir, Joseph Mischka conduct- 
ing, and Mrs. Crosby Adams at the organ. The solos in the Te Deum 
were sung by Mrs. William N. McCready, soprano ; Mrs. A. S. Fred- 
ericks, contralto ; Hobart Weed, tenor ; and Edward C. Walker, bass. 
F. C. M. Lautz was the baritone soloist. The boy choir sang carols at 
the offertory, and repeated them at the choral Even-song in the after- 
noon. The first Shelton memorial windows were unveiled. 

In May, 1887, it was proposed in the vestry meeting to have the 
vested chancel choir at the Sunday morning services ; but it was 
decided not to do so. Three thousand dollars were appropriated for 
the music for the ensuing year. 

The work of the two choirs at St. Paul's made heavy demands upon 
the time of the organist, and, with the increased number of services, 
Mr. Mischka found that it would be impossible for him to give proper 
attention to the music at the church without resigning some of his 
other musical work. He did not feel justified in doing this, and there- 



350 History of St. Paul's Church. 

fore, in November, 1887, he tendered his resignation as organist of St. 
Paul's, to take effect at any time before Easter when his successor 
should be secured. Mr. Mischka's resignation was much regretted, 
not only because of his musical ability but also on account of his uni- 
form courtesy and his consideration for others. He continued to play 
until February 12, 1888, at which time Charles S. Carter became organ- 
ist and director at St. Paul's, Mr. Mischka becoming, at that time, 
organist at the Delaware Avenue Methodist Church, where he still is. 

April I, 1888, Easter Day, there was an early choral celebration of 
the Holy Communion, Morning Prayer at 10.30, and choral Even-song 
at 4.00 P. M. — with Evening Prayer at 7.30 P. M. Mr. Carter was the 
organist, and John Lund directed, with an orchestra of ten pieces. 
The music was "of an unusually high order." Mrs. Fredericks sang 
Holden's Resurrection, with exquisite violin obligato, and F. C. M. 
Lautz sang Gilchrist's The Alleluia. The anthem Christ our Passover, 
with full chorus, and solos by Mrs. McCready and Edward C. Walker, 
"was a magnificent ^;za/^." April 7, 1888, John Lund was engaged at 
St. Paul's to take charge of the choir. 

After Easter (April i), 1888, Miss Gertrude L. Sears became the 
leading soprano at St. Paul's, and Mrs. Fredericks, the leading con- 
tralto, resigned. 

April 25, 1888, the Rev. Dr. Brown resigned his rectorship of St. 
Paul's, to take effect on the first of the following June, in order to 
become the rector of St. Thomas's Church, New York City. 

On Thursday, May 10, 1888, Ascension Day, St. Paul's Church was 
destroyed by fire. The congregation afterwards worshipped at the 
Temple Beth Zion (the Jewish synagogue, at that time on Niagara 
Street, where the Masonic Temple now stands), during the rebuilding 
of the church edifice. 

On the Sunday following the fire. May 14, 1888, the services were 
held at the Temple Beth Zion, but the chimes of the ruined church, 
themselves uninjured, pealed out, calling the people to worship. Dr. 
Brown conducted the choral Even-song. May 27, 1888, Mr. Carter 



The Music, iSiy-igoj. 351 

resigned as organist, and Miss Marie McConnell took his place, with 
John Lund as director. The choral vesper services were discontinued 
after June 17, 1888, in Temple Beth Zion. Miss Gertrude L. Sears 
was soprano until February 14, 1889. Miss A. M. Gates sang in 
August, 1888 ; also, P. G. Lapey, Mrs. Hancock Rice, Miss Eckart, 
and others. 

The Easter services, April 21, 1889, were held in the basement of 
the church, then in process of reconstruction after the fire. There 
was a large congregation. Under Mr. Lund's able direction "the 
music by the boy choir was of a high order of excellence," but no 
especial effects were attempted. Miss McConnell was organist. Mr. 
Lund continued at St. Paul's until October, 1889. 

In September, 1889, Samuel J. Gilbert was appointed organist and 
choir-master, being the first to hold that position in the restored 
church. His father was W. B. Gilbert, organist of Trinity Chapel, 
New York City. Miss McConnell continued at St. Paul's until April, 
1890. 

The restored St. Paul's was finished and ready for occupancy late 
in December, 1889, and on January 3, 1890, the new edifice was for- 
mally reopened and dedicated to the worship of Almighty God. No 
organ was placed in the west gallery, as formerly. The new chancel 
organ was a Hook & Hastings, and was tuned to French pitch. The 
quartette and mixed chorus choir were not continued after the restored 
church was used, the musical part of all the services being rendered 
by a full, vested, chancel choir of men and boys. 

In the rebuilding of the church special provision was made for the 
accommodation of a vested choir, the chancel was widened and made 
considerably deeper, and divided into choir and sanctuary, the choir 
portion having seats and stalls for the singers. The processional 
cross, carried by the crucifer in the procession of the vested choir, 
was first used in St. Paul's under the rector, the Rev. Henry A. Adams, 
at Easter, 1890. On April 6, 1890, the first Easter in the restored 
church, the morning service and choral Even-song were both attended 



352 History of St. Paul's Church. 

by very large congregations. The music was by the vested choir 
under the direction of the organist, Samuel J. Gilbert. Hobart Weed 
and Edward C. Walker both sang in the vested choir after the restora- 
tion of the church. 

At Easter, 1891, the music for the Holy Communion service in 
E flat was written by the organist, Samuel J. Gilbert, especially for St. 
Paul's choir, and was sung on this occasion for the first time. 

About this time the solo singing of Thornton Smith, one of the boy 
sopranos, was much praised. Mr. Gilbert was organist at St. Paul's 
from September, 1889, until Easter, 1892, when he was followed by E. 
Wesley Pyne, who served about ten months, and left early in 1893. 
In July, 1892, the Rev. J. A. Regester became the rector. Andrew T. 
Webster became organist and choir-master February i, 1893, and has 
filled the position most acceptably from that date to the present. The 
records of the choir, carefully kept by Mr. Webster from 1893, have 
been of much assistance in preparing the latter portion of this account 
of the music. 

The music committee in 1891 consisted of Edmund Hayes, A. J. 
Barnard, James R. Smith and Sheldon T. Viele ; Hobart Weed 
resigned in May, 1891, but was again on the committee in January, 
1892 ; in April, 1892, Edward C. Walker was added. 

In 1893 the choir consisted of twenty-three boys and fourteen men ; 
the three crucifers were, Guy C. Boughton, George Messer, and N. 
Orsini de Bock. In the autumn of 1893, Miss Harriet Welch (now 
Mrs. B. F. Spire) was engaged as solo soprano and continued as such 
until April 5, 1896. Miss Ada Prentice (now Mrs. Davidson) was con- 
tralto for a short time during the winter of 1893. 

In 1894, there were twenty-eight boys and twelve men, " and in 
addition to this regular vested choir, for the Sake of variety in the 
music, we have the services of Miss Welch, soprano ; " and, beginning 
December 7, 1894, Miss Clara Russell (now Mrs. Carlton White) was 
contralto, and sang until November 30, 1896. At Easter, 1894, the 
Communion service was Gounod's St. Cecilia in D, complete. The 



3. H 

2 I 



o ?0 
< PI 



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The Music, iSiy-igoj. 353 

wQmen of the choir sang in the chancel, but did not enter in the pro- 
cessional. 

October 4, 1895, E. E. Tanner was engaged as bass singer in the 
quartette, and sang until April 23, 1899. 

In 1895, the choir was substantially the same, and in 1896 there 
were twelve men and thirty boys ; Mrs. William Boughton was engaged 
to take Mrs. Spire's place as soprano, April 10, 1896, and sang until 
April 18, 1897. 

January 31, 1896, Frederick Elliott became the tenor, singing until 
September 30, 1896. " During last winter (1896) and again this season 
(1897) our organist, Andrew T. Webster, has, in addition to his many 
regular duties in connection with the services and training of the choir, 
given an organ recital every Sunday evening for half an hour before 
the service. Many avail themselves of the privilege thus afforded." 
These recitals have been continued to the present time (1903). 

About 1896, further changes in the basement of the church were 
made for the better accommodation of the vested choir. 

The music committee in 1896 consisted of Hobart Weed, Edmund 
Hayes, James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele and Philip S. Smith. The 
same committee served in 1897, 1898 and 1899. 

January 10, 1897, occurred the deeply-deplored and untimely death 
of Edward C. Walker, who had been for so many years a member of 
the earlier choirs, and connected with the musical matters of the 
church, and a member of many of the music committees. (See page 
217.) 

January 12, 1897, J. F. Thomas succeeded Mr. Elliott as tenor, 
singing until April 10, 1898. 

February 28, 1897, the evening of Quinquagesima Sunday, the 
cantata of The Holy City, by Alfred R. Gaul, was sung in the church, 
under Mr. Webster's direction, with Miss M. Agatha Bennett at the 
organ. On this occasion the vested choir was assisted by a volunteer 
chorus of about forty mixed voices. To accommodate these extra 
singers, seats, arranged like those of the vested choir, were placed in 



354 History of St. Paul's Church. 

the nave immediately in front of the choir portion of the chancel. 
There were, in all, about eighty voices, and the organ alone was used 
to accompany the singers. The music was very impressively and rev- 
erently sung. 

On April ii, 1897, the evening of Palm Sunday, the cantata of 
The Crucifixion, by Sir John Stainer, was sung in the church, under 
Mr. Webster's direction, with Henry S. Hendy at the organ. The 
vested choir was assisted, as before, by a volunteer chorus. 

December i, 1899, Miss Katheleen Howard became the contralto 
soloist, and sang until November 3, 1901. 

December 31, 1899, A Christmas Cantata, by Pearce, was sung in 
the church, Mr. Webster conducting. Miss Bennett at the organ, and a 
mixed chorus assisting as before. This cantata was repeated the fol- 
lowing Sunday evening. 

March 16, 1900, Miss Julia Agnes O'Connor became the solo 
soprano, still retaining the position. Two sopranos, Miss O'Connor and 
Miss Mildred D. Graham, and two contraltos. Miss Howard and Miss 
Gertrude A. Cashmore, sang in 1900 ; and in 1901 Miss Harriet Bis- 
sell and Miss Louise Scheer \yere also added to the choir. These 
ladies are a regular part of the vested choir, and enter in the proces- 
sional. They wear small black caps, and a special dress, which resem- 
bles the vestments worn by the other members of the choir. 

In January, 1900, the music committee consisted of Hobart Weed, 
Edmund Hayes and James R. Smith. In May, 1900, the vestry 
resolved : " That a vote of thanks be extended to Mr. Philip S. Smith, 
for the efificient services rendered by him during the past year, as a 
member of the music committee." 

The same committee as that in 1900 served also in 1901 and in 
1902. In 1900, Herbert Newton sang bass in the quartette. 

April I, 1900, the evening of Passion Sunday, the cantata of The 
Crucifixion was repeated. 

At Easter, 1901, Edward M. Sicard sang bass, the rest of the quar- 
tette being as before. The choir was assisted by the 74th Regiment 



The Music, i8iy-igoj. 355 

band. The "Year Book" says: "The marked improvement in the 
music, through the strengthening of the choir by the addition of 
women's voices, has been made possible by the generosity of several 
gentlemen of the parish." 

April 14, 1901, the evening of Low Sunday, the cantata of The 
Resurrection, by Manney, was rendered, the mixed chorus assisting the 
vested choir, as before ; Mr. Webster conducting, and Miss Bennett at 
the organ. From February i to May 26, 1901, Milnor Travis, harpist, 
was engaged. May 24, 1901, Carl D. Stephan became the tenor, suc- 
ceeding Mr. Hicks, and sang until April 30, 1902. 

March 23, 1902, the evening of Palm Sunday, the cantata of The 
Crucifixion was repeated. 

At Easter, March 30, 1902, the music at St. Paul's was highly com- 
mended. The solo work covered a wider range than usual. Miss 
O'Connor singing in the Gounod Mass the two tenor solos in the 
Sanctus, as well as the soprano solo in the Gloria. Miss Eleanor M. 
Dambmann came from New York to take the position of contralto in 
the quartette. Carl D. Stephan sang the tenor solo in the Te Deum, 
and Mr. Mitchell substituted for Mr. Radenovitz, who was ill. Mrs. 
George D. Morgan sang several solos in the Jubilate and also the 
offertory anthem, with violin obligato, kindly giving her services. A. 
T.Webster's carol, "The Day of Resurrection," was sung. Dudley 
Buck's festival Te Deum was given, and the Communion service was 
Gounod's J/ifWif Solennelle, " St. Cecilia." 

At this time the regular quartette was : Miss O'Connor, soprano ; 
Miss Dambmann, contralto ; Carl D. Stephan, tenor ; and Simon 
Radenovitz, bass ; Andrew T. Webster, organist and choir-master. 
The orchestra was under the direction of Frank Kuhn, and was placed 
in the north transept just outside the chancel, occupying the same 
position as the choir from 185 1 to 1863. All of the singers were vested, 
and occupied places in the choir portion of the chancel, and all took 
part in the processional and recessional. 

" Usually, during the winter, one or more of the Sunday evening 



356 History of St. Paul's Church. 

services are converted into special musical services. On the evening 
of Quinquagesima Sunday, February 9, 1902, the choir had the assist- 
ance of the ' Harmonie ' Ladies' Quartette, and Mr. Lapey, bass. 
They were placed in the loft, at the west end of the nave, and sang 
' List the cherubic host,' from Gaul's Holy City. Mrs. Spire also sang 
a solo. At the offertory, the antiphonal effect of Miss O'Connor's short 
solo sentences and the answering chancel choir was very beautiful." 

The late Charles M. Cashmore entered the choir some time in 1892, 
and soon after became librarian, retaining that post until his death, 
February i, 1902. His services were irjvaluable. The vested choir is 
a paid one throughout, with the exception of the men singers, six of 
whom only are paid, and the remainder give their services. 

It is noteworthy that almost all of the singers are members of the 
church. In the services, as conducted since the restoration of the 
edifice, the vested choir enters in procession from the basement or 
crypt, by the broad stairway, in the northeast corner of the church, 
in what is known as "the chapel." They pass through the north 
transept to the choir seats in the chancel, singing the processional 
hymn, and preceded by the crucifer. On the special festivals of the 
church, the procession passes through the north aisle to the main ves- 
tibule and thence through the center aisle to the chancel. At the end 
of the recessional the choir is dismissed in the crypt after a short 
prayer by the rector. 

May I, 1902, the vested choir quartette, as constitued at the pres- 
ent time, is : Miss O'Connor, soprano ; Miss Dambmann, contralto ; 
Frederick Hicks, tenor ; and, temporarily, J. Clark Milsom, bass, one 
of the singers of the choir. Mr. Milsom will be remembered as a boy 
soprano soloist, in the vested choir, in the '8o's, under Mr. Mischka. 

June, 1902, W. J. Mitchell became the solo bass singer at St. Paul's. 
February 22, 1903, The Holy City was repeated. At Easter (April 12th) 
1903, the choir had the assistance of Madame Brazzi, contralto, Mrs. 
G. D. Morgan, soprano, and an orchestra under Henry M. Marcus. 
A. T. Webster was organist and choir-master. 



1bi8torica[ Botes, 

1817=1903. 



St. Paul's Cburcb. 

Ibfstorfcal ©utUne, 

1817=1903. 



1817. February loth. — St. Paul's Parish organized and incorporated. (Population of 
Buffalo in 1817 about 1,500.) Rev. Samuel Johnston, missionary. (De- 
cember 30, 1813, Buffalo had been burned by the British.) 

1817. Rev. William A. Clark, missionary and first rector (to April 7, 1820). 

1819. May 20th. — Lot 42 given by Joseph EUicott, as agent for the Holland Land Co., 
on condition that a church be built. (See facsimile of Mr. EUicott's letter, 
in this volume.) 

1819. June 24th. — Corner stone of frame church edifice laid (Masonic ceremonies). 

(Rev. William A. Clark, rector.) 

1820. May. — Rev. Deodatus Babcock, second rector (to 1824). 

1820. June 14th. — Deed to Lot 42 given by Holland Land Co. 

1821. February 25th. — Frame church edifice consecrated by the Bishop of New York, 

Bishop Hobart. 
1821. (Summer.) — The first bell hung in the tower. 

1825. March 30th. — Rev. Addison Searle, third rector (to December 31, 1828). 
1825. October 26th. — Opening of the Erie Canal. 
1827. January 23d. —Glebe lot (or "Gospel lot") given to St. Paul's by Holland 

Land Co. — 100 acres about five miles from Buffalo, on Military Road. 

1827. Rev. Wm. Shelton of Connecticut preached in St. Paul's, as guest of the rec- 

tor, the Rev. Addison Searle. 

1828. The frame church enlarged. 

1829. January 17th. — Rev. Reverard Kearney, fourth rector (to June, 1829). 

1829. September 13th. — Rev. Wm. Shelton preached his first sermon as fifth rector of 
St. Paul's. He arrived in Buffalo September nth, on his thirty-first birthday. 

3S7 



358 History of St. Paul's Church. 

1830. September 30th. — Death of Bishop John Henry Hobart, in the fifty-fifth year 

of his age. 

1831. Side galleries built in frame church edifice. 

1832. Cholera raged in Buffalo, and again in 1834. 

1832. Buffalo incorporated as a city ; population 10,000. 

1833. Basement Sunday School room finished. 

1839. May 9th. — Consecration of Rev. Dr. William Heathcote DeLancey as first 

Bishop of Western New York. 
1844. June loth. — Lot on Pearl Street bought for rectory. 

1844. Vestry sold Glebe lot for $1,500. 

1845. April 7th. — Marriage of Dr. Shelton and Mrs. Lucretia Stanley Grosvenor. 

1847. Rectory finished. 

1848. Subscriptions for the new stone church started. 

1849. September 3d. — Excavations for foundations of new stone church begun. 

Most of foundation laid by December i, 1849 ! ^^ frame edifice being still 
in use. Cholera again in Buffalo. 

1850. Frame church edifice sold, removed from the lot in April. Last service in 

frame church March 17, 1850. 
1850. March 17 to April 21, 1851. — St. Paul's congregation worshipped in Clinton 
Hall on Washington Street. 

1850. June 1 2th. — Corner stone of new stone church edifice laid by Bishop DeLancey. 

1851. October 22d. — New stone church consecrated by Bishop DeLancey. Novem- 

ber 2, 1 85 1, Dr. Shelton's first sermon in the new edifice. 
1854. Receiving vault built (in church edifice). Cholera again in Buffalo. 
1854-1856. Basement Sunday School room, porches, stone steps, and main tower 

built. 

1856. The nine bells of the chime placed in main tower, and rung for the first time on 

Christmas Eve. 

1857. The tenth bell added to the chime, and the chiming apparatus placed in the 

tower. The gallery over the chapel on the north side of the church removed ; 

the glass partition, separating the lower part of the chapel beneath the 

gallery from the body of the church, had been removed (1856). 
1863. Fall. — Organ moved from over vestry room, at north of chancel, to west gallery 

of nave. In fall of i856 the former organ chamber was refitted as a room for 

meetings of building committee. In 1877 a chancel organ was placed there. 
1865. January 4th. — Rev. Dr. Arthur Cleveland Coxe consecrated Assistant Bishop 

of Western New York. 
1865. April 5th. — Death of Bishop DeLancey, in the sixty-eighth year of his age. 

Bishop Coxe became the second Bishop of Western New York. 



Historical Notes, iSiy-iQoj. 359 

1867. August 18th to November 17th. — The new, carved, black walnut stalls, reredos 
and bishop's chair put in place in the chancel. Font moved from in front 
of chancel to east end of the chapel. Walls of church decorated. 

1870. August 6th. — The main spire finished, and the gilded cross put in place. 

1 87 1. October 2d. — The spire of the small tower on Church Street finished. (In 

this tower has hung, since 185 1, the old bell of the frame church, bought in 

1821, and recast about 1826.) 
1873. May. — The stone crosses, finials, etc., finished (thus completing the edifice). 
1876. January and February. — The Sunday School room in basement refitted as a 

chapel, with altar placed against north wall. 
1879. September nth. — The fiftieth anniversary of Dr. Shelton's rectorate, and his 

eighty-first birthday. (The semi-centennial services were held on Sunday, 

September 14th.) 

1881. January nth. — Resignation of Dr. Shelton as rector of St. Paul's. Made 

honorary rector. 

1882. May 7th. — Rev. John W. Brown, D. D., sixth rector (to June I, 1888). 

1882. September 6th.— Death of Mrs. Shelton. 

1883. February 6th. — Death of Rev. Edward IngersoU, D. D., aged seventy-two 

years. (Rector Emeritus of Trinity Church, Buffalo.) 
1883. October nth. — Death of Dr. Shelton, aged eighty-five years, one month. 
1883. Sunday School room in basement much enlarged to east and north, altar moved 
to east end, and broad flight of stairs placed in northeast corner of room, 
leading to church. Rooms for vested choir also built in basement. 
1885. Use of receiving vault for the dead, in basement of church edifice, given up. 
(The entrance to this vault was from Pearl Street only, the door being that 
immediately north of the entrance to basement Sunday School room.) 

1887. December. The rector reported to the vestry that he had instituted regular 

daily services at St. Paul's, September ist. (These services have been con- 
tinued to the present time, 1903.) 

1888. April 25th. — Resignation of Rev. Dr. Brovra as rector (to take effect June I, 

1888). 
1888. May loth (Ascension Day).— St. Paul's Church destroyed by fire. 
1888. May 13th. — St. Paul's congregation worshipped in Temple Beth Zion, Niagara 
Street, given for their use, and continued to do so until Easter, 1889. 

1888. June 1st.— Rev. John Huske, minister-in-charge (to May 11, 1889). 

1889. April 2 1 St. — Easter services held in the basement Sunday School room, or 

"Crypt Chapel" of the church, which was used until the reopening of the 
church, January 3, 1890. 
1889. May to October.— Rev. G. Mott Williams, minister-in-charge. 



360 ' History of St. Paul's Church. 

1889. October 15th. — Rev. Henry A. Adams, seventh rector (to March i, 1892). 

1890. January 3d. — Service of Hallowing and Reconciling the restored church edi- 

fice, by Bishop Coxe. Evening of same day — Service in commemoration 
of the twenty-fifth anniversary of Bishop Coxe's episcopate, held in St. Paul's. 

1892. March 1st. — Resignation of Rev. Mr. Adams as rector. 

1892. March ist to April 30th. — Rev. Arthur J. Fidler, minister-in-charge. 

1892. July 5th. — Rev. J. A. Regester began his work as eighth rector. He preached 
his first sermon in St. Paul's on Sunday, July loth. 

1895. March. — Rectory, No. 61 Johnson's Park, purchased. 

1896. July 20th. — Death of Bishop Coxe, aged seventy-eight years. 

1896. December 23d. — Enthroniration of the Rt. Rev. William David Walker as 
third Bishop of Western New York. (Bishop Walker had been consecrated 
Missionary Bishop of North Dakota, December 20, 1883.) 

1896. The old Parish House, formerly Dr. Shelton's Rectory, No. 128 Pearl Street, 

demoHshed, and the new Parish House built on the site. 

1897. February 25th. — New Parish House opened. 

1902. February loth. — Eighty-fifth anniversary of the organization of the Parish of 
St. Paul's. (Population of Buffalo in 1902 about 406,000.) 

1902. July. — Tenth anniversary of the rectorate of the Rev. Dr. Regester. 

1902. July. — Deed of the small triangles of land, at east and southwest corners of 
the church lot, presented to St. Paul's by Farmers Loan and Trust Company 
of New York. 

Ube Seal of tbe Corporation. 



Church, 



The Seal of the church was chosen at a meeting of the vestry, held 
April 23, 1821, at which it was : " Resolved, That the church adopt as its 
common seal a marble eight-sided cone, whereon is engraved the let- 
ters ' St. Paul's Church, Buffalo.' " (Page 21.) 



Historical Notes, iSiy-igoj. 361 

This description seems to require a few words of explanation. The 
original die was used for making impressions in wax only, and the 
device was engraved on the lower surface of a small piece of marble, 
the upper part of this piece of marble being cut into the shape of the 
" eight-sided cone," or pyramid, described in the resolution. This 
pyramid formed a handle merely, and was no part of the device of the 
seal itself. The present seal is the same as the original one, but is 
engraved in a metal die, and used in a press to emboss paper, as is now 
customary. 

The legal name of the corporation is " St. Paul's Church in Buffalo." 



Ube iFirst IRoman Catbolic ^ass in Buffalo. 

The following reference to St. Paul's Parish will be found at page 
211, "Missions in Western New York and Church History of the Dio- 
cese of Buffalo," by Rt. Rev. John Timon, D. D., first Bishop of the 
Roman Catholic diocese of Buffalo, published in 1862 : 

"The first recorded visit of a priest occurred eight years after Buffalo had been 
burned down by the British. The Rt. Rev. Henry Conwell, Bishop of Philadelphia, 
then passed through on his way westward, and baptised a child of Patrick O'Rourke, 
whose pious wife still remembers and relates the facts. 

"The few Catholics of this place were next visited, in 1821, by the Rev. Mr. 
Kelly of Rochester, who said Mass in St. Paul's, the Episcopal Church ; only five 
Catholic families being in attendance." 

This is the first recorded celebration in Buffalo of the Mass of the 
Roman Catholic Church. The Rev. Deodatus Babcock was rector of 
St. Paul's at this time. 



IRotes on tbe Earls IRectors. 

The Rev. Samuel Johnston was the missionary under whom St. 
Paul's Parish was organized in 1817 ; and the Rev. William A. Clark 
was the missionary and first rector, from 1817 to April 7, 1820, and 



362 History of St. Paul's Church. 

in 1 819, during his rectorate, the building of the first frame edifice 
was begun. (Pages 8 to 18.) 



The Rev. Deodatus Babcock became the second rector of St. Paul's 
in May, 1820, and remained there until 1824. He had been living in 
the Village of Buffalo before becoming rector, and had been ordered 
deacon, but he was not ordained to the priesthood until August, 1821. 
In a paper on " The Buffalo Common Schools," read before the Buffalo 
Historical Society by the late O. G. Steele, in 1863, occurs the follow- 
ing mention of this early rector of St. Paul's : " After the war 
(of 1812) a school was started, and kept in such rooms as could be 

obtained While near Mr. Callender's it was taught by Rev. 

Deodatus Babcock, an Ejiiscopal minister, who taught some of the 
higher branches. A lady of the city relates with how much awe she 
looked upon Mr. Babcock, when he was hearing a recitation in Latin, 
from Orsamus Marshall." 

The Buffalo Commercial published, in 1866-7, a series of reminis- 
cences signed Historicus. Concerning the members of the earliest mu- 
sical association in Buffalo, the Musica Sacra Society, founded in 1820, he 
writes : . . . . " The leader and teacher was Rev. Deodatus Babcock, 

. . now residing at Balliston Spa, New York Mr. Babcock 

was of tall and heavy stature, much like Rev. Mr. Hitchcock, of slow 
and stately movements, and of a serious demeanour, that impressed 
one with his honesty and earnestness. I was much awed by his 
solemnity of manner when he sprinkled on my unworthy head the 

holy waters of the baptismal rite If a moment is offered for 

reflection how swiftly willing memory runs over the unseen keys that 
vibrate to us the sweet peaceful tones of the choir, that lifted up a 
song of rejoicing over the young lambs taken into the fold of Christ 
and sealed with His divine signet. The quiet church is again before 
the eye, with its crowd of reverent worshippers, and filled with that 
indescribable rapt Presence, that makes us love the Beauty of Holi- 
ness. . . . Clergymen had a different way of living then from what 



Historical Notes, i8iy-igoj. 363 

they have now — more simple and patriarchal Like the self- 
denying and enthusiastic Paul, they often 'laboured willingly with 
their hands.' I remember to have gone, one wintry afternoon, to get 
Mr. Babcock to visit my grandmother, and administer the consolations 
of the Gospel, as she was thought to be dying, and found him vigor- 
ously wielding an axe, cutting his own fire-wood from a pile of green 
beech at the door. . . He then lived in the house now occupied 
by S. N. Callander, on Erie Street near Pearl — or the one next to it. 
He was a sturdy chopper, and made the chips fly. A good man, too, 
was Parson Babcock." .... 

A part of the Eev. Mr. Babcock's salary as rector was paid in fire- 
wood. (See pages 19 to 24, this volume.) 



The Rev. Addison Searle was third rector of St. Paul's, from March 
30, 1825, to December 31, 1828. (Pages 25 to 36.) 

In an interesting paper on the founding of the " City of Ararat," 
in 1825, by the Hon. Lewis F. Allen, read by him before the Buffalo 
Historical Society, March 5, 1866, is the following : 

. . . "The Rev. Mr. Searle was, at that time, the officiating clergyman in the 
little church of St. Paul's, in the Village of Buffalo, and had been placed there as a 
missionary by the late wise and excellent Bishop Hobart. He held a government 
commission as chaplain of the United States, and had been granted a some years' fur- 
lough from active duty. He had been on foreign cruises — had coasted the Mediterra- 
nean, and spent months in the chief cities of its classic shores, and visited the beautiful 
Greek island of Scio, a few weeks after the burning of its towns and the massacre of 
its people by the Turks, in 1822. He was an accomplished and genial man, of com- 
manding person and portly mien ; his manners were bland, and his address courtly. 
Whether he had made the acquaintance of Major Noah abroad or in New York, or 
whether he first met him on this occasion at Buffalo, I know not ; but their intercourse 
here was cordial and friendly." .... (See page 366, this volume.) 

There are, doubtless, latter-day critics who may be inclined to cen- 
sure the Rev. Mr. Searle for allowing the corner stone of the antici- 
pated Jewish city to be dedicated and laid on the altar of the church 
of which he was rector, and for taking part himself in the ceremonial. 



364 History of St. Paul's Church. 

It must be remembered, however, that St. Paul's Church was, at that 
early day, the only public building of a religious character in the vil- 
lage, and it was not feasible to lay the stone at Grand Island. Major 
Noah, while peculiar and oriental in his character, was nevertheless 
thoroughly in earnest in his effort to found a city for his scattered peo- 
ple, and he seems to have been a man of deep religious feeling. All 
of this probably appealed to Mr. Searle, who, in that wilderness, felt 
the call strong upon him to be " given to hospitality." Mr. Searle, 
while a loyal churchman, seems to have been broad-minded and liberal 
towards all men, and a whole-souled and genial man himself. His 
sense of duty was very strong, as is shown by his giving his best 
energies to the building up of the church in what was then a small 
frontier village, with no conveniences, very little to attract a man of 
Mr. Searle's previous experiences, and a climate rigorous and most 
trying to his constitution. It was this last drawback which seems to 
have been the only one which caused him to relinquish his work, and 
even that he bravely withstood until some one, more vigorous phys- 
ically than himself, could be found to take his place. His letters show 
him also to have had a strong and saving sense of humor, and some of 
his references to the primitive mode of life he was obliged to adopt 
are exceedingly witty. For the people of his charge he expresses the 
kindest feelings and much affectionate regard. 

In his fiftieth anniversary sermon, September 14, 1879, Dr. Shelton 
thus refers to his early friend, the Rev. Addison Searle : . . . . " The 
memory of this excellent and genial Christian minister has ever since 
been cherished by those who were his parishioners with every senti- 
ment of respect and hearty affection." .... 

In the annual address on the occasion of the fourth " Old Folks' 
Festival," January 24, 1867, the Rev. John C. Lord, D. D., speaks 
thus : . . . . " With the Rev. Mr. Searle, rector of St. Paul's, I next 
made acquaintance. He was the predecessor of the Rev. Dr. Shelton, 
who has been settled here for a longer period than any other clergy- 
man, and who enjoys a large measure of the esteem and affection of 



Historical Notes, iSiy-igoj. 365 

our community, irrespective of denominational boundaries. Mr. Searle 
was a finished gentleman in manners. . . He was highly and de- 
servedly esteemed. My impression is that he was the highest kind of 
High Churchman." .... Dr. Lord, who was always a loved and 
respected friend of Dr. Shelton, was the pastor of the Central Pres- 
byterian Church for many years. 

Extracts from Some Earlg Xetters from tbe IRev. 

H55ison Searle, IRector of St. Paul's 

Cburcb, to Bfsbop Ibobart, etc. 

"Buffalo, 23d July, 1827. 
.... "Your invitation for me to accompany you to the West will be most cheer- 
fully accepted, should it be in my power to do so. The revenues of my pontificate, 
' the bishop of the Buffaloes,' are limited, very limited, when we consider how many 
expenses necessary and unavoidable in building up this church devolve upon pastor 
and people, — still, I shall do my best, and rest content with the result. My little 
parish continues gradually to flourish." . . 

loth April, 1828 : 

. . . . " I am helped by the Great Head of the church, I trust, amidst all the 
difficulties and dangers of my post, to build up this little parish gradually, constantly, 

and permanently on Church principles But I have nearly done, unless the 

spring soon smile upon us On Easter . . . gave the Communion to more 

persons than were ever before at the Altar of this church on a similar occasion. . 

My congregation here is quickening its onward march a little under its anxious 

shepherd." .... 

2d August, 1828, he writes : 

.... " We are enlarging and repairing St. Paul's Church ; but are in the con- 
stant use of it for public worship." .... 

nth September, 1828 : 

. ..." I shall continue to officiate here, if possible, until the Rev. Wm. Shelton, 
elected for this station, shall arrive. It is not known that he will come ; still it is con- 
fidently expected he will accept the offer. Our church is beautiful, and is nearly com- 
pleted. It would have been done ere this but for the great sickness and mortality 
with which we have been visited. Nothing in the course of my life has given me 



366 History of St. Paul's Church. 

such pain and sorrow as the necessity I am under of leaving my very kind and affec- 
tionate people. It is now settled ; and I hope to be away from the piercing winds of 
Lake Erie before the inclemency of winter comes upon me. " . . . . 

October 18, 1828, he writes : 

. . . . " Wherever I may go, however distant my station may be from the Diocese 
of New York, let me ask it of you, that you will not forget me, notwithstanding my 
numerous faults and imperfections. My separation from my people is the greatest 
affliction of my life. The wind? of this lake would probably kill me. They have 
commenced their ravages upon me already for this winter. The most I can do is to 
remain in the discharge of the duties of the station until my successor shall come. 
St. Paul's Church, in this village, is a beautiful building, and, with the exception of 
St. Luke's at Rochester, is the handsomest in this part of the State. We have given 
the body of the church a light dove color, and painted the finish with white. We 
shall soon reoccupy it. The congregation is prosperous." .... 

In a letter to Bishop Hobart, dated " Eagle Tavern, Buffalo, 
17th November, 1828," Rev. Mr. Searle writes, after regretting the 
Rev. Wm. Shelton's decision not to accept the call to St. Paul's, Buffalo, 
and asking the bishop to suggest another candidate : 

. . . . " I will not leave this people without ministerial aid, unless obliged to do so 
by circumstances beyond my control St. Paul's is completed with the excep- 
tion of a little about the chancel. It is magnificently plain, and, with the exception 
of St. Luke's at Rochester, is the handsomest church in this part of the State." .... 

In a letter to T. L. Ogden, Esq., dated Buffalo, December 10, 1827, 
relative to a proposed discontinuance of the " missionary aid " to the 
parish, Rev. Mr. Searle, after requesting the board to reconsider their 
decision, says : 

. . . . " However painful it may be for me to leave the people of my church, 
always kind to me, I hope for the happiness of leaving them in a flourishing condi- 
tion My health has failed me. Yesterday I was compelled to stop in the 

midst of the sermon and dismiss the congregation." .... 

/IDajor IRoab's Cit^. 

The following extracts are from a letter, written by the late Hon. 
Lewis F. Allen to the Buffalo Courier, under date of May 15, 1888, in 




Monument to the memory of the Ri-:v. ADDISON SEARLE. Mount Auburn Cemetery. 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. From a photograph by G. H. B., September 3, 1903. 



The inscription, under the open bible, cross and anchor, is as follows : 

"Rev. Addison Searle, late Senior Chaplain in the U. S. N. Buried at Sea, August 2, 
1850. Erected by friends who valuing him in life remember him in death with true affection 
and deep regard." 

Upon the back of the shaft is a circular, sunken panel containing the masonic symbol, 
an open bible with the square and compasses. 

This monument, which we discovered unexpectedly while on a visit to the cemetery in 
September, 1003, is of white marble, and is situated on Pyrola Path, opposite the stone erected 
in memory of the celebrated Margaret Fuller. The Rev. Mr. Searle was the third rector of 
St. Paul's^ from March 30, 1825, to December 31, 182S. (See pages 25 to 39, and 363 to 370 



Historical Notes, 1817-igoj. 367 

regard to Major Mordecai M. Noah. (See page 27, this volume. Also 
page 169.) 

" To THE Editor : 

" Your relation of ' A strange spectacle, that of a congregation of Gentiles worship- 
ping in a synagogue,' is no more than that of returning a graceful act of hospitality on 
the part of the congregation of the ancient St. Paul's, nearly sixty-three years ago, in 
permitting, with the assistance of the Rev. Addison Searle, then filling the pulpit of 
that little church, the laying of the ' corner stone ' of the proposed ' City of Ararat,' 
to be founded on Grand Island, several miles down the Niagara River, on the Com- 
munion table of the church, instead of on the ground where the anticipated city was to 
be built This act of last Sunday, was most generous on the part of the syna- 
gogue and its rabbi, but whether either the learned rabbi or a single one of this con- 
gregation knew of the previous liberality of the people of St. Paul's is a matter of 
doubt, as probably not one of them was living in Buffalo at the time. The facts are 
rather memorable and worth relating, recalled as they are by only a few survivors of 

the time In the summer of 1825, the State of New York, then owner of 

Grand Island, sold the 117 farm lots which it had recently laid out by survey in the 
wilderness to various parties in the State, among others to Mr. Samuel Leggitt, a 
wealthy Quaker of New York City Major Mordecai Manuel Noah, a dis- 
tinguished Israelite of that city, then editor of the chief ' Tammany ' newspaper, had 
conceived the project of building a Jewish city on the island, and from Mr. Leggitt 
had obtained refusal of his lands for that purpose. The Erie Canal was just about to 
be finished, and in the wealth and enterprise of the Israelites he anticipated that a 
large commercial city could be founded to control the trade of the lakes and canal 

.... at a point nearly opposite Tonawanda Major Noah heralded his plans 

through his newspaper with both energy and ability, for he was a graceful scholar, 
as well as a leader in his political party. . . . But the sharp intellects of his 
Jewish brethren were skeptical to his plans, and they gave no assistance to his proj- 
ects. Yet he was a determined man and bent on laying a corner stone to his antici- 
pated city. In the month of August, therefore, he packed his judicial robes, for he 
had assumed the title of ' Judge of Israel,' proceeded to Albany in a steamboat, and 
thence to Buffalo by stage. At Buffalo he knew no one but Mr. Isaac Smith, a com- 
mercial resident, and the Rev. Addison Searle, the then missionary at St. Paul's. 
These gentlemen he had both known while he was United States consul at Tunis, on 
the Mediterranean Shore .... Mr. Searle being chaplain on one of the government 
ships of war, on a cruising expedition. . . .He had notified them of his coming 

and intention Mr. Smith procured the stone for his arrival Once 

here, he found the site of his city was ten miles away on a wilderness shore. 



368 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



.... and never even seeing the island, save by map, tie obtained leave of the people 
of St. Paul's and Mr. Searle to lay his corner stone on the Communion table inside of 
the church, near the pulpit, and perform all the ceremonies of the occasion. The 
Masonic order of the village, .... and a military company .... led a large 
procession to the church, headed by the 'Judge of Israel,' who in his robes of scarlet, 
with the Bible, and other adjuncts, performed the services necessary to such an 
imposing occasion, in which Mr. Searle gave the limited assistance required, and the 
little organ in the gallery furnished the music to complete it. After the ceremonial 
services. Major Noah delivered an able discourse, setting forth the plans of his pro- 
posed city, settlement and prospects, which ended the remarkable doings of the day, 
reports of all of which were published in the monthly newspaper of the village (the 
Buffalo Patriot). Thus ended the whole affair. Within a day or two afterward 
Major Noah left the village for New York, and never returned to visit it or to see the 

territory of Grand Island .... the project utterly failed of accomplishment 

The laying of the corner stone of a Jewish city on the Communion table of a Protestant 
Episcopal church, was noted only as an episode of the day, and no reflection was 
made upon the conduct of the Rev. Mr. Searle or his congregation for their act of 

generosity to a stranger, although so unique in its occasion The " corner 

stone,' famous for many years of notice by tourists, was afterwards rescued from its 
neglect by the writer of this sketch .... and presented by him some years ago to 
the Buffalo Historical Society, where, with its Hebrew inscription, it holds an honor- 
able place among the many earlier collections of our past history." 
[The ceremony above described was held September 2, 1825.] 




CORNER STONE OF THE CITY OF ARARAT. 



Historical Notes, iSiy-igoj. 369 

The stone bears an inscription, first, in Hebrew text, the words 
from Deut. vi, 4 : 

" ' Hear, oh Israel, 
The Lord our God is one Lord.' 

ARARAT, 

A City of Refuge for the Jews, 

Founded by Mordecai Manuel Noah 

In the month Tizri, 5586, September, 1825, and in the 50TH 

Year of American Independence." 

The above letter simply gives a brief outline of this strange affair. 

Mr. Allen knew Major Noah well, and has previously told this story, 
with full and interesting detail, in a paper entitled " Founding of the 
City of Ararat on Grand Island," which he read before the "Buffalo 
Historical Society Club," March 6, 1866, and which may be found in 
Volume I. of the publications of that society, issued in 1879, at pages 
305-328. This paper by Mr. Allen was first published in the Buffalo 
City Directory of 1867, the year after it was written. 

The well-known author, Israel Zangwill, has also used this inci- 
dent as the basis of a short story called " Noah's Ark," in his volume, 
published in 1899, entitled " They That Walk in Darkness." With the 
exception of one imaginary character, in the story of " Noah's Ark," 
the facts are used almost literally. Old St. Paul's and its rector, the 
Rev. Addison Searle, each appear in propria persona, as do also — to 
give an added tint to the local color, doubtless — Red Jacket and 
Joseph Ellicott, spelled Elliot. 

Hccounts an5 HnecOotes of tbe IRev. 2)r. Sbelton. 

The late Rev. Dr. John W. Brown, always full of kindly considera- 
tion for the aged honorary rector, did not fail to do honor to his mem- 
ory when he had passed away. The impressive and tender funeral 
sermon which he preached in St. Paul's on October 14, 1883, is noted 
earlier in this volume. (Pages 147, 148.) 



370 History of St. Pauls Church. 

He wrote a very interesting account of his predecessor in an 
article entitled "William Shelton, D. D.," published in the American 
Church Review for March, 1884, dealing more particularly with Dr. 
Shelton's relations to the Church. The magazine gives, as frontispiece, 
a small steel portrait of Dr. Shelton, engraved after the photograph 
taken in Brussels in 1865, one of the best photographic portraits of 
Dr. Shelton ever made. The frontispiece of this history is reproduced 
from the same photograph. 

The following extracts from Dr. Brown's article are given, bringing 
out, as they do, many points in Dr. Shelton's character : 

.... "The desire for the companionship of his 'grave and reverend seniors' 
Vfas a marked peculiarity of his youth. Once when Bishop Hobart was a guest of his 
father, William was deputed to take the bishop in the gig to New York. On their 
way, through Mamaroneck plains, a young man was overtaken on the road. The 
bishop called halt and, warmly greeting the gentleman, entered into conversation about 
some studies and books. After starting on their journey the bishop said, ' William, 
that young man is named DeLancey and is studying under me for the ministry, and 
you mark my word, he will make a name for himself in the Church. ' The first bishop 
of Western New York, fully verified the prophecy. . . . 

.... "The Rev. Addison Searle, who preceded Dr. Shelton as rector, writes to 
him in 1827 [after his first visit to Buffalo]; 'We are gratified to learn that you arrived 
safely in your snug and quiet home, and that you were pleased with your excursion to 
these western wilds ; especially that this frontier station — this outpost of the Union, 
Buffalo, in its rude state seemed so agreeable to you. It is a goodly heritage, but has 
few pleasures, luxuries or advantages in comparison of the old, longrsettled parts of 
the country.' .... 

. . . . " Travelling by wagon and boat he [Dr. Shelton] reached his [Buffalo] parish in 
the early fall of 1829. The city had less than 10,000 in population, and was considered a 

frontier town In an address delivered by him on an occasion celebrating his 

seventy-eighth birthday, he says : ' I was, at my coming, in entire ignorance of western 
habits and people. The congregation was composed of persons from various parts of 
the nation, .... and many who knew little of the claims of the Church and were 
ignorant of her doctrines. It can be readily understood how nice a matter it was to 
me who was bred in the bosom of the Church, who believed all her doctrines and felt 
bound to proclaim them. I taught doctrines and inculcated opinions which had never 
been heard of, and which seemed not only strange but so exclusive as to be illiberal 
and uncharitable. ' . . . . 



Historical Notes, iSij-igoj. 371 

.... "In these early years his nearest clerical neighbors were the brethren in 
Canada, and the courteous friendship begun then lasted through his whole life. The 
Lord Bishop of Niagara when present at the fiftieth anniversary of his rectorship said : 
' Amongst the many blessings with which a gracious God has surrounded me, I count 
my acquaintance with Dr. Shelton to be among the greatest. It commenced nearly 
half a century ago, and has been interrupted by not a single unpleasantness. ' . . 
The Bishop also stated at that time, what he repeated at the memorial service held on 
All Saints Day, November i, 1883, namely, 'that it was owing to the information and 
instruction received from Dr. Shelton which led to the publication of a pamphlet by 
himself concerning the organization of the Church in the Dominion and which resulted 
in the present ecclesiastical system established.' In speaking further of this work in 
its extent, he said : ' How much, then, is he a benefactor who has been instrumental in 
turning the thoughts of a young friend into a channel which has produced such bless- 
ings as have been conferred upon the colonial and Irish branches of the Church of 
Christ by our synodical system copied in great measure from the Church in the United 
States.' .... 

.... "In 1845 ^^ was married to Mrs. Lucretia Grosvenor He called 

their long married life an uninterrupted blessing. She was indeed a worthy help-meet, 
and her death, which preceded his just a. year, was a blow from which he never 
recovered 

"The best word which expresses the character of Dr. Shelton is strength. Robust 
in body, he was also robust in thought. This strength of character was manifest in 
all he said and did. It impressed itself upon every person or work with which he was 
connected. Such a strong man must have made his virtues prominent. It produced 
an integrity which was unqualified. Every one said, ' He is an honest man. ' Such a 
strong character could not help but show faults as prominently, for he could not under 
any circumstances be a dissembler. He was essentially a true man. These faults of 
his temperament are forgotten in the remembrance of the righteousness which filled 
out his life. He was large-hearted and unboundedly generous. Since his death the 
statements are shown which make him dispense one-third of his entire income in cer- 
tain years for charity and other pious works. One peculiarity of his temperament was 
to be easily depressed and discouraged, but the reboimd would follow with increased 
power and hope. He was not very self-dependent but modest and humble-minded. 
He distrusted his own powers, but when his abilities were demanded discharged his 
public duties fearlessly and with usual success." .... 

In this magazine article are several typographical errors which should 
be noted. On pages 205 and 206 of the magazine, the letters written by 



372 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Rev. Dr. S. F. Jarvis, in 1818, to Dr. Shelton's father, the Rev. Philo Shel- 
ton, in reference to the imminent probability of his (the Rev. Philo Shel- 
ton) being elected Bishop of Connecticut, are printed in the magazine 
as if addressed to Rev. William Shelton, the son, then a student in his 
twentieth year. And, referring to the system of laity representation in 
the Church of England in the colonies, in the fifth line from bot- 
tom of page 210, by printing, " copied in great measure /(^r the Church 
in the United States," the intended meaning of the sentence is reversed. 
¥ or for read from. 

Bishop Coxe, in his memorial sermon, preached on All Saints' Day, 
November i, 1883, thus refers to the words in regard to Dr. Shelton 
spoken by the Lord Bishop of Niagara : " He has told us of the adop- 
tion of the laity into the councils of the churches of the Dominion, 
and of the fact that, in this respect and others, the constitutions of the 
colonial churches and of the disestablished Church of Ireland have 
been patterned after ours. More than that, he tells us that if ever the 
Church of England herself shall be disestablished by national caprice, 
her constitution, as such, will be similar. Now, I know that to the 
Bishop. of Niagara the colonial churches are largely indebted for this 
great plan of reconstruction. But, he tells us, he himself learned it 
from your late rector. Dr. Shelton was thus the modest link by which a 
great chain of unity has been made complete throughout the Anglo- 
Catholic world. This was his greatest contribution to the general 
work of the Church, in his generation, and thereby the man of God in 
this city has been felt, in his influence, wherever the English language 
is spoken." .... 

Other quotations from this sermon of Bishop Coxe will be found 
on pages 150-152. 

The following extracts are from a valuable paper on Dr. Shelton, 
treating of him especially in his capacity as a citizen, prepared and 
read before the Buffalo Historical Society on February 15, 1886, by 
the late Rev. Dr. Brown. The manuscript has not been published, but 



Historical Notes, iSiy-igoj. 373 

is in the possession of the society, and through the thoughtful cour- 
tesy of the secretary, Frank H. Severance, we are enabled to make use 
of it here : 

. . . . " From all that can be learned, there was no expressed wish on the part of 
the young Shelton at that time [before 1827] to seek the far west as a field of labor. 
He, however, made an excursion to Canada, and went down the St. Lawrence in a 
canoe with an Indian guide. After this he was quite anxious to be the guest of the 
wonderful Eagle Hotel, which had already obtained an extended reputation for its 
excellence. Walking down the street he met Rev. Mr. Searle, who at that time was 
the pastor of St. Paul's. This must have been about two years previous to his coming 
to Buffalo [to stay]. Mr. Searle prevailed on his young friend to remain over Sunday, 
which he did, and preached in the little old frame church with such effectiveness that 
the congregation determined to secure him, if possible, to succeed Mr. Searle on his 
departure. Mr. Searle, too, evidently was much taken with the young preacher and 
seconded the efforts of the people to obtain his services. . . Mr. Shelton con- 

cluded at first to give up all idea of coming west. Mr. Searle, February 11, 1828, 
replied by letter to some inquiries made by Mr. Shelton regarding the parish — as to 
salary, etc. He says the salary from the parish is $550, from the missionary fund $125 
— about $700 — which would do for himself very well if it were not for the numerous 
church wants — ' and moreover it was not so much when I came, but with the rise of the 
parish the salary has risen §150.' . . . . The expenses, he wrote, were about the 
same as in New England, excepting fuel and meats — fuel good and cheap — meats, 
excepting the excellent venison, very cheap and generally very poor. Mr. Shelton 
asks, 'What are the real prospects of Buffalo?' Mr. Searle replies, 'neither so won- 
derfully great as some have imagined, nor so very inconsiderable as others have repre- 
sented. It will be a great inland town and is now advancing fast enough for permanent 

growth You would, in my humble opinion, do remarkably well for this place. 

But the other consideration, whether you would be contented and happy in Buffalo or no, 

I cannot tell Much, very much people visit this place every year and would 

expose you to some agreeable, interesting company. This is a frontier station, truly 
an outpost.' .... 

" In 1832 the cholera raged in the city, and here was exhibited the fearless devotion 
to duty which always characterized the life of him of whom we now write. It is 
recorded that Dr. Shelton was the only clergyman here at that time for five weeks' dura- 
tion of the scourge. R. W. Haskins, Esq., in a letter, calls that year of the cholera 
< a memorable year.' It was the year in which the cholera first made its appearance in 
the United States. ' Its fame as the mysterious destroyer of our race had preceded its 
approach from Europe, and when it actually appeared among us, stout nerves were 



374 History of St. Paul's Church. 

shaken, and consternation was as general as it well could be, without becoming abso- 
lutely universal.' .... 

"The new minister at once, on coming to Buffalo, sought the comforts of the 
renowned Eagle Tavern, and his long-personal friend, our worthy and venerable towns- 
man, Hon. Lewis F. Allen, told me he remembered him very well as one of the board- 
ers — always in his place, an affable, dignified and welcome guest. He remained at 

the Eagle until the sad departure of Mr. Rathbun Dr. Shelton, I find from 

the remembrance of those who knew him in the early life of his ministry here, was 
always interested and foremost in every movement which had for its object the welfare 
of the town and the improvement of society. As one remarked to me — whatever 
came up to produce any stir, the Domine was always on hand. When the old Kremlin 
block burned [1832] he was there as a fireman, working with might and main to sub- 
due the flames. Fond as lie was of literary pursuits, it was but natural that we dis- 
cover him associated with well-known names in the lyceum and literary associations of 

the town Indeed, I find among his papers a theme on ' The foundation of a 

fund for the support of literary men.' This was written as early as 1817, and must 
have been his' subject when he graduated from the academy 

[The original of this early article by Dr. Shelton is in the possession of the Buffalo 
Historical Society.] 

"Dr. Shelton was chosen the first president of the Young Men's Association, in 
1835. ... It was, if I mistake not, at this time (about 1835), that the rioble and 
splendid John C. Lord began his ministry here, and with whom Dr. Shelton had the 
most affectionate and fraternal companionship. Positive and strong as their tempera- 
ments were, they ever held the other in honor and esteem through their lives, and Dr. 
Shelton spoke of it as a blessed privilege to enjoy the friendship of this excellent citi- 
zen and pastor. When the intrepid soldier of the Cross laid aside his armor, it was 
his old friend who came to minister with others at his death-bed. Once, in a tremend- 
ous storm, the winter, I think, in which Dr. Lord died, Dr. Shelton sought to reach 
the home of his old friend on horseback. There was no roadway — every path was 
blocked with snow. The family saw a form struggling in the drift as if trying to reach 
the house. The farm hand was sent to the assistance of Dr. Shelton, who had to 
abandon his horse, and reached the house much exhaused from his labors. [Dr. Lord's 
home was far out Delaware Avenue, opposite Forest Lawn, and was, at that time, 
almost in the open country.] It was the Doctor's voice, too, which was heard com- 
mitting his friend to his resting-place in Forest Lawn. " . . . . 

"He traveled throughout Europe and visited the Holy Land [in 1851 and again in 
1864-5]. The journal of his travels shows him to have been an industrious sight-seer, 
and close observer of men and things. He returned much invigorated by his trip, and 
entered again with great fervor into his work. Dr. Shelton was pronounced in all he 



Historical Notes, iSiy-igoj. 375 

undertook of whatever nature. He was this or nothing. So was he in his loyalty to 
his country as he was to his Church, and though no public mention do I find of any 
special service at the time of the war, yet I am informed that in every effort of the citi- 
zens in behalf of the country and the soldiers he had his full share, and discharged his 
duty with the same zeal which marked his every work. The Doctor had many valued 
friends abroad, especially in England, but he never allowed his friendship to permit any 
lack of deference in behalf of his country, and he really by his correspondence accom- 
plished much good. 

" One of his friends in England was Sir John Seymour. He addressed him an 
epistle couched in most earnest and indeed vehement language to protest against the 
supposed action of England when Mason and Slidell were arrested. I have seen very 
long letters from his other English friends showing the correspondence to have been 
voluminous 

"As a clergyman, he attained a national reputation in the Church for the fearless 
defense of Christian truth and for the eminence of his Christian character. He was 
signally honored by his Diocesan. . . Bishop DeLancey addresses him in his cor- 
respondence as dear Shelton, and shows the most unqualified confidence in his friend- 
ship and judgment. This was mutual — and so with the present beloved Diocesan 
[Bishop Coxe] — him he held in high honor and affection. . . . 

" A word of him as you all knew him — to remind you of the sincerity of his char- 
acter — the honesty of his purpose — and the generosity of his heart. The poor he 
never turned empty away, and he often admitted how he had been imposed upon by 
the unworthy — yet, as he said, he could not help it. This feature in his life was most 
prominent. . . .On the bitterest, coldest nights in winter you would meet him 
with a huge bundle under his arm going to the homes of the destitute. Once he came 
in from one of his visitations and asked his wife for some bed clothing. She said, 
' My dear Doctor, you have nearly taken everything already.' 'Never mind,' he said, 
'I must have it,' and stripping the clothing from the bed, he started out on his errand 
of mercy 

. ..." It is most proper to mention here his intimacy and strong attachment to the 
genuine brother and friend, Dr. IngersoU. In the closing of their lives respectively they 
were brought very near together, and Dr. IngersoU was seldom a single day from his 
side. The gentle, amiable, confiding temperament of the one — in connection with 
the strong, stern, noble and assertive one of the other, were but the deepening richness 
of color and the lighter glory in the same Christian character — like St. Paul and St. 
John — filling out so grandly the lives of these devoted servants of God. , . . 

"The testimony of the bishop .... is, 'That a Shelton in every town 

would be salt to the nation.' . . . So we bear him in blessed memory — whose 
work cannot be computed by figures— whose life cannot be estimated in years. Bound 



3/6 History of St. Paul's Church. 

up m the book of his living are the records of lives whose histories cannot be told. 
The tear-stained pages are there — for he was ever ready to minister to the sorrowing. 
The brightly illuminated pages, too, are there, for he ... . shared with all their 
bright days of happy reunion. The heroic tale is part of his life, for he was fearless 
and brave — in all his duty. These all, in their endless variety and influence, went 
to make up the unwritten history of our venerable father, now at rest. 

"He was a dutiful citizen — a true friend — an honest man — an humble Christian 
— a faithful servant of the Most High God. " 



The terrible time of the cholera epidemic, in 1832, referred to in 
the quotation from Dr. Brown's paper, is graphically described by the 
late Hon. Lewis F. Allen, in his article, in Volume IV. of the Publica- 
tions of the Buffalo Historical Society. Mr. Allen characterizes Loring 
Peirce, the sexton of St. Paul's, as " a hero," for his tireless and inval- 
uable services during this time of appalling trouble. (See also the 
footnote, pages 107, 108, this volume.) 

In Mr. Allen's article, as indeed quite generally in all the articles 
referring to him which have been printed in the newspapers and 
elsewhere, the name has been misspelled " Pierce." " Loren Perce " is 
another incorrectly printed variation. He, himself, wrote it invaria- 
bly Loring Peirce, a form of spelling well known in New England. 
His autograph signatures on the subscription lists for the building 
of St. Paul's, and on numerous receipts still in existence, are distinctly 
written and are always the same. The name was pronounced " Purse." 

The cholera returned again to Buffalo in 1834, with equal violence, 
but the terror of the people was not quite so great, owing to the 
improved facilities for coping with it, and to a better knowledge of its 
treatment. 

Again, in 1849, the dreadful scourge reappeared, at which time 
many victims fell beneath its ravages, among them both Mr. and Mrs. 
William Williams, who died on the same day, August i, 1849. Mr. 
Williams was a prominent member of St. Paul's, a vestryman, the 
efficient treasurer of the parish, and a member of the building com- 
mittee for the new church. (Page 57.) 



Historical Notes, iSiy-igoj. -iyy 

September i, 1849, Jacob A. Barker, writing to Mr. Upjohn, refers 
to the heavy blow sustained by the church in Mr. Williams's death, 
and says, further, that the general health of the town is so far improved 
that the work on the foundations was then about to begin. He refers 
in other letters, at that period, to the delay in the building operations 
caused by the terrible sickness — of the impossibility of having a quo- 
rum of the building committee, most of whom had taken their families 
and left the town — and of the great difficulty in getting workmen 
sufficient to do the excavating. Cholera came again in 1854. 

Through all of these terrible visitations. Dr. Shelton remained 
at his post, often walking several times a day to the cemeteries to read 
the burial service over the victims. 

Forest Lawn Cemetery was not used until July, 1850. 



The following copies of the original autograph letters are of inter- 
est as bearing upon two important points in Dr. Shelton's early life : 

" I hereby certify that William Shelton has for more than one year past been a can- 
didate for Holy Orders in this Diocese, and that he is now, at his request, dismissed 
from the same, for the purpose of connecting himself with the Diocese of New York. 

" New Haven, June 28, 1823 

"T. C. BROWNELL, 
"Bishop of the Diocese of Connecticut." 

"The Rev. Wm. Shelton, a Presbyter of the Diocese of Connecticut, intending to 
visit the western part of this State on his way to the Falls of Niagara, I take this mode 
of introducing him to the clergy and to the members and friends of our Church. Mr. 
Shelton is an alumnus of the General Theological Seminary, and is highly esteemed by 
me for his talents, his piety and general worth. 

"JOHN HENRY HOBART, 

"New York, July 3, 1827. "Bishop Diocese of New York." 



In an old book of "Records of Ministerial Duties," dated 1824, in 
Dr. Shelton's handwriting, are the following entries : 

"Was ordained [deacon] by Bishop Brownell, at Cheshire, Connecticut, August 6, 
1823. 



378 History of St. Paul's Church. 

"Arrived at Plattsburg [New York], August ii, 1823. 

" On the 23d day of July, 1824, I gave up the missionary station at Plattsburg, 
and returned to Connecticut 

" Memoranda of the Parish of St. Paul's, Red Hook [New York], October i, 1824. 
Arrived at Upper Red Hook the last of August, and preached until the meeting of the 
convention, at which time accepted the proposals of the wardens and vestry, which 
were that I should remain with them, and receive for my support the amount of sub- 
scriptions — 420 dollars — and whatever over should be collected. . . At the 
expiration of my year's engagement at Red Hook . . I determined to leave, not 
knowing whither I should go. . . . 

"After preaching about a month in the parishes of Fairfield [Trinity Church] and 
Weston [Connecticut] on New Year's Day, 1826, my regular year commenced. Here, 
living in my own home and surrounded by my hereditary friends, and protecting my 
own family, I preach over the bones of my venerated father — usefully, I trust — with 
a salary of $450. The parish of Fairfield contains about fifty families, all in moderate 
circumstances, and living in much simplicity." (See pages 40, 41, 149, 150, 151, 152.) 

The Rev. Mr Shelton was ordained to the priesthood, by Bishop 
Brownell, May 17, 1826, in Trinity Church, Fairfield. (Report of the 
bishop to the convention of the Diocese of Connecticut, June, 1826.) 



In a paper read before the Buffalo Historical Society by William 
Hodge, Februar)' 4, 1879, entitled "Buffalo Cemeteries," is the 
following : 

. . . . "The first interment in Forest Lawn was that of John Lay, Jr. . . 
Late one summer afternoon, July 12, 1850, the quiet of the place was broken by the 
entrance of the first funereal train ; and at the going down of the sun, as the earth 
closed over the mortal remains of John Lay, Jr., began the peopling of this new 
necropolis of the Queen City of the Lakes. On that occasion were heard for the first 
time in this cemetery the words of the lofty and impressive burial service of the Epis- 
copal Church, as Mr. Lay was consigned to his final resting place, under the direction 
of him who had performed this office for two generations of his fellow citizens ; I mean 
the late Loring Peirce, so many years our 'city sexton. ' Since then, how rapidly has 
been fulfilled the saying of the venerable and beloved rector of St. Paul's Cathedral, 
who officiated at that time, and, as he surveyed the place, bethinking him of its 
intended purpose, exclaimed, ' What a flood of grief will here be poured out.' " . 
(Volume L, "Publications of the Buffalo Historical Society. "_) 



Historical Notes, i8iy-igoj. 379 

No pictures are in existence, save those in the recollections of the 
older citizens, showing Dr. Shelton as he was wont to go about the city, 
years ago, upon errands of business or mercy, mounted on his favorite 
horse. Dr. Shelton was a fine horseman, and sat firmly and well, feeling 
and appearing perfectly at home in the saddle. He continued this almost 
daily custom until considerably beyond his three score years and ten. 
Memory, only, recalls the dignified figure and the sedately-stepping horse 
as they passed down the quiet, shady streets of the Buffalo of those days. 

The remembrance of a joke upon the Doctor has outlasted more than 
half a century. When the rectory on Pearl Street was completed in 
1847, Dr. Shelton felt that, being parish property, it should not be 
regarded merely as his personal residence. 

Accordingly, one day a plate appeared upon the door, bearing the 
words " St. Paul's Rectory." 

The rector's old friend, Sheldon Thompson, one of the founders of 
the parish, passing slowly down Pearl Street, saw the little sign. 

Turning, he ascended the steps and rang the bell. " Is Saint Paul 
in ? " he inquired solicitously, and then hurried away. What the Doctor 
said when he heard of this bit of pleasantry is not recorded, but there is 
no doubt as to what he did. The inscription promptly disappeared and 
the well-remembered silver plate, reading simply "William Shelton," 
took its place. 

The following little story is told of Dr. Shelton, and is so charac- 
teristic of one phase of his personality that it should not be lost. In 
the old days, the young people of the parish used to meet together in 
the basement of the church in the week before Christmas, to make 
wreaths and garlands of evergreens to decorate the edifice at the great 
festival, and these meetings often called forth much innocent jollity. 
Upon one occasion (in the so's) it was decided to have an impromptu 
dance in the basement as a reward for the steady work of the evening. 
Dr. Shelton coming in said, " I hear there is some talk of a dance here 
to-night." " Yes, Doctor," replied one of the young men, " we thought 



380 History of St. Paul's Church. 

we would have a little dance after we finished the work." "Well, 
snapped the Doctor in a terrible voice, " you can't have it — I won't 
allow it." There was much murmuring, but nothing to be said against 
the Doctor's command. Later he came back, and, saying sternly, " I 
want to see you across the street at my house — I have something to 
say to you," turned and went out. Much rebellion on the part of the 
young people followed at a prospect of further lecturing from the 
irate Doctor, and some declared that they would not go, but it was 
finally decided to adjourn to the rectory in a body, as to refuse would 
be disrespectful and likely to hurt the Doctor's feelings. Dr. Shelton 
met them at the door of the rectory, and with a kindly gleam in his eye, 
behind a fierce frown, said : " The entire church is consecrated, and no 
place for dancing — you may dance here." Then the fjrown vanished, 
and with beaming face he shook hands and welcomed each one by 
name. Two fiddlers had been brought in, and, after a merry dance, 
the folding doors at the back of the large parlors were thrown back, 
and a bountiful supper was served, after which they all went home 
feeling more than ever that Dr. Shelton was a father to each and all. 



Sometime in 1870, a mortgage had been placed upon the Pearl Street 
Rectory, incurred in order to complete the fund for the main spire, etc., 
of the church. This debt was being extinguished by frequent offertories 
for what Dr. Shelton called " The Tower Fund." One Sunday morning, 
when Bishop Bissell of Vermont was present, Dr. Shelton announced 
that " the collection to be taken up after the sermon would be for the 
Tower Fund," whereupon, to the delight of the congregation. Bishop 
Bissell entering the pulpit, announced his text from St. Luke, xiv., 28 : 
" For which of you intending to build a tower, sitteth not down first, and 
counteth the cost, whether he have sufficient to finish it ? " It is needless 
to add that the good bishop was wholly innocent of any local application. 



Dr. Shelton took a deep interest in western missions, and especially 
in Nashotah in its earlier years, and there was long a " Nashotah So- 
ciety" in the parish, to aid the seminary, which was founded in 1842. 



Historical Notes, i8iy-igoj. 381 

Shelton Hall, a handsome stone building now used at Nashotah House 
as a commons and professors' residence, is named for Dr. Shelton, and 
was largely built through his own generosity and that of St. Paul's 
Parish. In the building is an oil portrait of him, and a number of 
views of St. Paul's, Buffalo. In the chapel of the seminary are sev- 
eral memorial windows, given by St. Paul's : one to Bishop Seabury, 
one to the Rev. Philo Shelton, one to the late Edward S. Warren, and 
another to his young son. Dr. Shelton was for many years a trustee of 
Nashotah House. 

The Gospel Messenger, in an article published in 1862, describes the 
stained glass window, given by Dr. Shelton in memory of his father, 
at Nashotah. The window bears the Shelton coat of arms with the 
motto, " Nil sine Deo," and the following inscription : 

"A Filial Memorial 

to the 

Rev. Philo Shelton, A. M., 

a faithful and true churchman, 

who, for nearly forty years, was the beloved and venerated 

Rector of the parishes of 

Fairfield and Bridgeport 

Connecticut. 

He was the first person ordained by the Rt. Rev. Samuel Seabury, D. D., 

the first Bishop of the American Church, A. D. 1785. 

Born 1754. Died 1825." 

. . " My venerated father lived forty years in the only parish 
he ever served. My younger brother lived thirty-seven years in the 
only charge he ever had, and I myself have presided over my own 
beloved parish forty-eight years. These are examples of stability 
which do not often appear in this changing and uncertain age." (Rev. 
Dr. Shelton, in an address at the reunion of the Shelton family, at 
Birmingham, Conn., June 14, i877-) 

For references to the Rev. Philo Shelton's ordination, see foot note, 
page 40, this volume. Also, " History of Stratford and Bridgeport, 
Connecticut," by Rev. Samuel Orcutt, Part I., pages 623-625. Tablets 
to the memory of the Rev. Philo Shelton were placed in the old church 



382 History of St. Paul's Church. 

in Mill Plain, Fairfield (under the chancel of which he was at first buried), 
and in St. John's Church, Bridgeport. Dr. Shelton's mother survived 
her husband thirteen years, and " left a name only to be loved and hon- 
ored by her friends." She is buried by the side of her husband and two 
daughters in Mountain Grove Cemetery, Bridgeport. In the inscription 
on the marble monument, erected by Dr. Shelton to their memory, he 
speaks of his father as "a faithful pastor, a guileless and godly man." 



On Monday, March 13, 1876, occurred the formal opening of the 
new City Hall. At the dedication of the Common Council Chamber, 
in the afternoon, the prayer at the opening of the exercises was by 
the Rev. Dr. John C. Lord, and the benediction at the close was by 
the Rev. Dr. Shelton. 

The formal congratulations referred to on page 124 were extended 
to Dr. Shelton on the occasion of the semi-centennial of his rectorate,_ 
by the Ministers' Meeting, principally composed of thirty Buffalo cler- 
gymen of the Presbyterian, Methodist and Baptist churches. On the 
evening of September 15, 1879, the ministers called upon Dr. Shelton 
in a body at the rectory, and the resolutions which had been adopted 
at a meeting held at Calvary Presbyterian Church that afternoon, were 
read by the Rev. A. T. Chester, D. D. They were as follows : 

"The Ministers' Meeting of Buffalo, composed of thirty clergymen of different 
denominations, offer hearty congratulations to the Rev. William Shelton, D. D. , rector 
of St. Paul's Church of this city, who has now occupied this honored position for the 
period of fifty years. Few are permitted to preach the Gospel and administer the 
ordinances of the Church continuously for half a century, very few have exercised these 
sacred functions for so long a period in the same congregations. We should not be 
mindful as we ought of the providence of God, nor grateful as we ought for such 
marked favor to His Church, if we failed to take some notice of this anniversary which 
bounds fifty years of faithful service, of thorough attachment to the doctrines of the 
Gospel, of heroic devotion to the cause of Christ, our common Master, in one who, as 
our neighbor and friend, has also illustrated in all these fifty years the characteristics of 
a high-minded Christian gentleman. We, therefore, representing so many branches of 
the Church of Christ on this jubilee, take great pleasure in adding our voices to the 
general congratulations heard on every side, and we join most earnestly in the prayer 



Historical Notes, iSiy-igoj. 383 

that this useful and honored life may continue to be under the special care of Him who 
has ordered it beyond its four-score years, and that when the summons comes to close 
this earthly work, the Master may say, 'Well done,' and receive His faithful servant 
into an everlasting habitation." 

Dr. Shelton was deeply moved, and in his response said that there 
had been nothing among the happenings of his anniversary which had 
given him more gratification. This event, as rare as it was appropri- 
ate, made a lasting impression upon Dr. Shelton, and showed him, as 
few things could have done, the veneration in which he was held by 
the beloved city of his adoption. In later years he often referred to 
it, with tears of sincere pleasure and emotion in his eyes. 



On the morning of Easter Monday, March 29, 1880, there appeared 
in the Buffalo Express a certain locally famous editorial entitled 
" Now by St. Paul's," written by the editor and proprietor of the paper, 
the late James N. Matthews, who was not one of Dr. Shelton's parish- 
ioners. In the course of this editorial, so just and beautiful a tribute 
is paid to Dr. Shelton, that it seems fitting to quote it here : 

.... " St. Paul's Church and its venerable rector have long been objects of pride 
and affection with our whole community. Where is there another structure which 
elicits so much of the people's admiration as this beautiful church ? Where is there 
another citizen who commands so much of their respect as the grand old man to whose 
Christian zeal, untiring energy, and unselfish liberality they are indebted for it ? It is 
impossible to circumscribe within the limits of St. Paul's Parish and congregation the 
almost filial interest with which Dr. Shelton and his church are regarded by nearly every 

man, woman and child in Buffalo In his eighty-first year he could safely 

throw himself upon the fidelity and affection of a people with whom he has walked in 
God, ministering unto them in all holy things, more than half a century, in season 
and out of season, in sickness and in health, in the death-chamber and at the open 
grave." . . 

Earls l^ears of tbe (Tburcb in Butfalo. 

From a published sermon by the Rev. Charles Wells Hayes, D. D., 
entitled " Early Years of the Church in Buffalo," preached for the 



384 History of St. Paul's Church. 

seventy-seventh anniversary of Grace Church, Black Rock, in 1901, the 
following extracts are made : 

.... "Not until 1 816 comes the first mention of church services in Buffalo, appa- 
rently late in the fall of that year, by the Rev. Samuel Johnston, ' missionary in Gene- 
esee and Niagara counties.' I wish we knew more about this first Buffalo clergyman, 
who, ordered deacon June 17, 1816, began his missionary work three months later, by 
giving two Sundays at Batavia to one in Buffalo. He was afterwards a faithful pioneer 
missionary in Ohio under Bishop Chase, and died of cholera in Cincinnati, May 22, 
1833. Batavia was then a much more important place than Buffalo, and a parish was 
already organized there. But Mr. Johnston did good work here also, resulting in the 
organization of St. Paul's Church, February 10, 1817. 

. . . . " The most noteworthy fact of the year [1821] was the consecration of St. 
Paul's Church by Bishop Hobart, February 25, 1821. The bishop says, in recording 
the consecration of this 'neat and commodious edifice on the banks of Lake Erie, at 
Buffalo,' that 'this is comparatively a new village, having been settled little more than 
twenty years [in fact it had been burned to the ground only seven years before], and I 
experienced high gratification in witnessing the spirited exertions of the congregation 
in the erection of their edifice.' How many of you who are here to-day remember 
that ' neat and commodious edifice ? ' My earliest recollection of it, as a boy of five 
years old, is of wonder at its grandeur and beauty, although my Canandaigua home 
boasted of what Bishop Hobart calls, in the Christian Journal oi 18 1 7, 'a building of 
beautiful and imposing exterior, a model for other churches. ' From Canandaigua, a 
half-day's stage ride to the flourishing village of Rochester, and thence twenty-two 
hours — a night and a day — in the luxurious packet boats (as we thought them) of the 
Erie Canal, gave me my first sight of that first Buffalo church. My remembrance of 

its exterior is somewhat vague Once inside, three things chiefly impressed 

themselves upon me, and are fixed in memory : the magnificent chandeliers, all glass, 
filled with candles which I firmly believed to be of purest wax ; the great organ (as 
I thought it) at one end, and at the other, towering up above the broad white front of 
the ' reading desk, ' the imposing form and face of dear old Dr. Shelton in his snowy 
surplice of many folds, mysteriously transparent bands, and broad, black scarf (stoles 
were unheard of then) — a form and face I learned to know and love better through 
many a year after. " . . . 

The following extracts are from a letter, dated August 7, 1902, 
written to Howard H. Baker, by George L. Newman of Charlottes- 
ville, Virginia, formerly of Buffalo : 

"I became one of Mr. Webster's family in 1830, and, of course, attended 



Historical Notes, iSij-igoj. 385 

church with him (he was a warden). I remained attached to St. Paul's until the 
organization of Trinity Parish, in 1836. Mr. Shelton boarded with Mrs. Rathbun. 
Every Sunday he came to our house to supper. His salary was, I believe, $600. I 
can name a number of the families attending there in 1830. There were the Eatons, 
Strykers, Thompsons, Tillinghasts, Pierre A. Barkers, Manly Colton, Braces, H. 
Colton, Staats, J. A. Barker, Aliens, Wheelers, Kimberlys, Websters, Fords, 
Radcliffes, Athearns, Kips, James D. Sheppard, organist and leader of the choir. 

I wonder how many there are living now who can remember those times. John 
Pease was there, about eighteen years old, I imagine. The only means of heating the 
church was a stove in the vestibule for four foot wood. Loring Peirce was sexton, and 
every Sunday after the congregation was seated he would tip-toe in, carrying the little 
foot-stoves he had filled with embers, distributing them to the female part of the audi- 
ence. Coal was an unknown fuel in Buffalo at that period. Mr. Webster was captain 
of the only fire company. Cataract No. i. Many householders had leather fire buckets 
marked with their names hung up in their halls ready for an emergency. There were no 
water reservoirs, and the good wives of the village were supplied with water for the weekly 
wash by Dutch John, who perambulated the streets with a cask of it, crying "Vater, 
Vater." I am writing of 1830, when I went to Buffalo. There was not a foot of pav- 
ing in the village, and very few except earth sidewalks. In winter the boys used to 
slide on Main Street from corner of Crow (Exchange) Street to the canal." .... 



It may be interesting to add here, as an instance of the early activi- 
ties of St. Paul's, that Grace Church, Sandusky, Ohio, was founded by 
Zenas Ward Barker, son of Zenas Barker, and his sister, Mrs. John G. 
Camp, and that it was through the efforts of Mrs. Camp that the first 
funds to start that church were secured from St. Paul's Parish, Buffalo. 
The corner stone was laid in 1835, by Dr. Shelton. Alanson Palmer 
gave money for chandeliers of elegant design. Mrs. John G. Camp 
was also a sister of Jacob A. Barker. (See pages 9, 10.) 

Tlbe Banft of Englanb anC» St. Paul's. 

A curious fact, and one little known, is that the Bank of England 
once owned a pew in the old frame edifice of St. Paul's. This hap- 
pened in the following way : About the year 1848, R. Hargreave Lee, 
an Englishman residing in Buffalo, and a member of and pew owner in 



386 History of St. Paul's Church. 

St. Paul's, having become financially involved, was obliged to make 
over to the Bank of England, of which institution he was a debtor, 
certain of his personal effects, including his pew in St. Paul's Church. 
The bank therefore became a pew owner in the church, although, in 
compliance with the law, the title to the pew was nominally vested in 
the firm of American bankers who acted as its agents. About this 
time, arrangements were being made for the erection of the new stone 
church, and the ownership of a pew by the Bank of England gave rise 
to certain legal complications and occasioned much correspondence 
between the vestry and the bank officials. The matter was finally 
satisfactorily adjusted by the purchase of the pew from the bank by 
one of the members of the parish. This occurrence is also interesting 
as showing how far-reaching even at that early day, were the business 
methods of this famous English institution. 

The pew in St. Paul's Church was not the only piece of Buffalo 
property owned by that corporation ; the title to the land upon which 
the Buffalo Club house now stands, on the corner of Delaware Avenue 
and Trinity Place, was also held at one time by the Bank of England. 

Hccount of tbe formation of a jfree Cburcb for 
5La??e ^en anb ©tbers. [1849.] 

(Extracts from the original manuscript book of minutes, treasurer's 
account, etc.) 

. . . . " The rapid increase of the laboring population of our city, 
particularly in the lower wards, and the total inadequacy of church 
accommodation adapted to the wants of that class of our citizens, had 
long made it the earnest desire of the clergy and laity of the parishes 
of St. Paul's, Trinity and St. John's to establish a free place of worship 
in some locality suitable for that purpose, and for the resort of seamen 
and boatmen visiting our port. 

"In May, 1849, the Rev. Seth Davis, a presbyter of the church, 
with the sanction of the rectors of the three parishes, by personal 



Historical Notes, iSiy-igoj. 387 

application to the laity, obtained for this purpose a subscription 
amounting to $411, and rented and fitted up in a neat and appropriate 
manner, the second floor room of a new building . . .on the east 
side of Main Street, north of and adjoining the Erie Canal (at that 
time No. 93 Main Street). The cost of the outfit, including chancel 
desks, altar, font, seats, etc., .... amounted to $212.72. 

" The first service was held in the room Sunday, June 24, 1849, Mr. 
Davis officiating ; but after holding service three Sundays and opening 
a Sunday School, he was compelled by sickness [an attack of the pre- 
vailing scourge, cholera] to relinquish the charge, and eventually left 
the city. The regular services were, however, maintained (with the 
exception of one Sunday) by lay reading, first by Mr. Stephen Walker 
and afterwards by Mr. George Morgan Hills, until about November 
ist, when the Rev. Joshua Smith, deacon, was engaged until April i, 

1850 Under his care there has been a steady increase in the 

attendance .... and the Sunday School now numbers fifty scholars. 
The teachers, to whose labors much of the success of the Sunday 
School must be attributed, are Mr. J. L. Reynolds, Miss Clark, Miss 
Baird and Mr. O. H. P. Champlin, the latter of whom is at present 
superintendent. During the winter the evening services were con- 
ducted . . . chiefly by Dr. Shelton of St. Paul's and the Rev. Mr. 
Ingersoll of Trinity, there being a regular evening service at St. John's, 
preventing the rector, the Rev. Mr. Schuyler, from aiding in those at 
the free church. The want of a musical instrument being much felt, 
a melodeon was presented by the ladies of the three parishes ; . . . . 
the cost was $40. 

" After Mr. Davis resigned his charge the care of it devolved more 
particularly upon Messrs. Samuel D. Flagg and George C. Webster of 
St. Paul's parish ; James L. Reynolds and G. L. Newman of Trinity, 
and H. Rainey of St. John's. . . .A more perfect organization 
being deemed necessary, the vestries appointed .... a committee for 
that purpose. From St. Paul's, Charles W. Evans, DeWitt C. Weed, 
and George C. Webster ; from Trinity, John M. Hutchinson and G. 



388 History of St. Pauls Church. 

L. Newman ; from St. John's, Andrew Houliston, J. H. H. Wheeler and 

T. H. Mendsen Charles W. Evans was appointed treasurer and 

secretary, and John M. Hutchinson chairman of the committee 

" The subscriptions being inadequate to the necessary expenditures 
of the free church, it was resolved, at a meeting held on February 3, 
185 1, ' that the services of the Free Episcopal Church be discontinued 
from and after the second Sunday in February ' (being the 9th of 
February) 

" At the above-mentioned date it was found necessary to give over 
the effort for the present, though with the hope that it might be suc- 
cessfully resumed at some future time." .... 

IRemoval of tbe jframe Cburcb, 1850. 

In a long-forgotten Buffalo Magazine, The Western Literary 
Messenger for May and June, 1850, was printed a curious article, in two 
instalments, entitled " Extracts from my Diary, by St. Paul's." It is 
evidently from the pen of the editor, Jesse Clement, and purports to 
give the observations and reflections of the old frame church during its 
journey, from April ist to April 29, 1850, from St. Paul's lot, up 
Main Street to Genesee Street, and thence out the latter street to the 
lot on the northeast corner of Hickory Street, which it was to occupy, 
as St. Peter's German Evangelical Church, until demolished in 1877. 

The article is written in a playfully pathetic tone and gives a 
glimpse of the Main Street at that time. The old church is left 
lamenting the hardship of having to revise its theology and conquer 
the language of Luther in its old age. 

" Extracts from my Diary " can be seen at the Buffalo Public 
Library, where an incomplete file of the magazine is preserved. 

It is difficult to realize that back in the '40's and 'so's Buffalo 
was the home for many years of a successful literary venture, to which 
even from its inception in 1842 the leading writers of the country 
contributed. 




GERMAN EVANGELICAL ST. PETER-S CHURCH. 

Northeast corner of Genesee and Hickory streets, formerly old St. Paul's frame edifice. Sold and removed 

here April. 1850, and demolished in May, 1877. The tablet over the door and the two-window 

extension in the rear were added by St. Peter's Congregation. 



Reproduced bj' permission from a plujto- 
^raph owned by the Buffalo llisiorical 



Historical Notes, i8ij-igoj. 389 

Frank H. Severance in his interesting paper, " Random Notes on the 
Authors of Buffalo," read before the Buffalo Historical Society in 1889, 
and printed in Volume IV. of the Society's " Publications," referring to 
the Western Literary Messenger, says : " It was the most creditable 
literary periodical, all things considered, that Western New York has 
ever supported." 

Another article, from the Buffalo Commercial Advertiser of March 9, 
1850, says : " It is not an uninteresting coincidence that it [St. Paul's] 
should follow its predecessor, the First Presbyterian Church, which it 

is to displace, a small wooden edifice After the erection of 

their present house, the Presbyterians sold it [the small wooden build- 
ing] to the Niagara Street Methodist Church It was after- 
wards removed to Genesee Street, and .... occupied by a German 
Protestant Society, the same which has now purchased St. Paul's." 



In an account of the Thirteenth Annual Festival of the Old Set- 
tlers of Buffalo, published in the Buffalo Commercial Advertiser of 
January 14, 1876, among other reminiscences appears the following 
reference to Dr. Shelton and St. Paul's before the removal of the old 
frame edifice : " The Doctor had a garden in one corner of the church 
lot, on the Pearl Street side, we believe, wherein he cultivated a large 
quantity of choice flowers." 

XTbe IRumbering of tbe pearl Street IRectorg. 

In the city directories from 1847 to 1856, Dr. Shelton's rectory is 
spoken of as " in rear of " or " opposite " St. Paul's Church on Pearl 
Street. In the directory for 1856, for the first time, it appears as No. 
64 Pearl Street. About ten years later the numbering of the streets 
of Buffalo was changed and systematized, on the basis of twenty feet 
frontage to a number. The directories of 1866 and 1867 speak of 
"the imperfect numbering of our streets." In 1868 this phrase no 
longer appears. In the city directory of 1867, No. 64 appears for the 



390 History of St. Paul's Church. 

last time, and in that of 1868 the number 128 Pearl Street takes its 
place and is the same number in use to-day. 



Ube mooben ^o5el of St. Paul's, 1850. 

As is detailed in this History, the stone edifice of St. Paul's, begun 
in 1849, was not fully completed until 1873, when the stone crosses and 
last finials were put in place. During much of this period there stood, 
for many years, on a raised platform in the west vestibule, an accurately 
designed model of the church in wood. Picturing the beauty of the 
completed structure, it stood there, a silent appeal for subscriptions. 

After the completion of the church edifice, the model was kept for 
a time in the second story of the former Church Street porch. (The 
baptistery in the present edifice occupies the site of this old porch.) 
Later, the model disappeared, and no one seems to have thought it 
worthy of even the most casual care. About the year 1895, Frank 
Gedies, then a member of the vested choir and also in charge of chim- 
ing the bells, found the model, broken and dismantled, hidden away 
with other odds and ends under the belfry stairs in the main tower. 
Here it had escaped the ravages of the fire of i888, but no one of 
those he asked could give him any information as to its history. 
He, fortunately, realized the value of this interesting relic, and, as a 
labor of love, devoted many of his spare hours to repairing and 
restoring it. Mr. Gedies finished the work in 1898, and the model is 
now locked up in the room over the northwest porch. This room 
opens onto the west gallery, and was formerly used as a storeroom for 
the music of the chorus choir. 

The greatest architects and designers use models of this kind 
because they give a better conception of what the finished structure 
will be than any drawing. The old model of St. Paul's, always inter- 
esting, shows the church as originally designed by Richard Upjohn, 
and has now acquired a new value by reason of the extensive changes 
in the design as rebuilt after the fire. 




THE WOODEX MODEL OF ST. PAUL'S, iS;o. (See pages 3'?o to 30=, 
Photographs by G, H. E., IQ02. 



Historical Notes, 1817-igoj. 391 

The model is made to a scale of one-quarter inch to the foot. Its 
greatest length, including the chancel, nave and tower, is three feet 
seven and three-quarter inches, equivalent to 175 feet, which was the 
length of the church previous to the extension of the chancel in the 
recent restoration, after the fire of 1 888. 

The height of the tower and spire, from the base to the top of the 
finial upon which the little gilded cross rests, as shown by the model, is 
four feet eight and one quarter inches, equivalent to 225 feet, which is 
the height as originally planned by Mr. Upjohn, and which was 
increased later. 

As before stated, the model was made from Mr. Upjohn's original 
plans, and shows the crockets and other details on the large and small 
spires which were omitted when the work was finally constructed. 
(Page 103, note.) 

The model shows the exterior of the church, with the stone steps and 
porches, and is complete in every detail, even to the reproduction in the 
tiny crosses of the varying design of the stone crosses upon the finished 
edifice. The whole is painted brown and sanded, to represent the stone 
of which the church is built. The four small windows in the Erie Street 
porch were not in the original plans, and are not shown in the model. 
Jacob A. Barker, of the building committee, wrote to Mr. Upjohn, July 
17, 1854, just before this porch was built, calling his attention to the 
omission, which was promptly corrected. 

Mr. Barker, in a letter dated August 14, 1854, to Richard Upjohn, 
the architect, refers to this miniature representation of the church as 
" the model Mr. Riker had made " from the original plans. The letter 
was written at the time of the building of the porches. George Riker 
was the master carpenter, or superintendent, who was engaged, on Mr. 
Upjohn's high recommendation, in 1850. 

Another reference to the model is in the minutes of the building com- 
mittee, December 27, i866,whichshowsthatitwas used in the work: "The 
model of the church was shown to Mr. Green [one of the contractors], 
with a view of explaining to him the portions to be finished." . . 



392 History of St. Paul's Church. 

It is to be hoped that this interesting reminder of the past will be 
properly preserved as a " historical document," and that it may be 
placed where it can be readily seen and examined. (See illustration.) 

motes on tbe SunSap Scbool. 

The Buffalo Daily Courier of Saturday, April 14, i860, says, referring 
to the Sunday School statistics of Buffalo, then recently compiled by 
the Rev. P. G. Cook : " It appears that there are fifty-seven schools, 
with an average attendance for the month of March (1860) of 886 
teachers and 5,686 scholars. The largest school for the month of 
March was St. Paul's Episcopal (262 scholars) closely followed by the 
Cedar Street Baptist (253 scholars)." .... 

Numerous references to the Sunday School of St. Paul's, which 
dates from the year 1818, will be found in the pages of this History. 
It has been impossible to give a separate and detailed account of this 
most important and valuable adjunct of the work of the Church, on 
account of lack of accessible data for the purpose. 

The children of an earlier day recall with pleasure the old-time 
Christmas festivals in the Sunday School, and the tree with its glow- 
ing lights, bearing a gift for each child. 

On the afternoon of each Whitsunday the scholars assembled in 
the church, and it was the custom of Dr. Shelton, at that time, to 
deliver prizes to those pupils who were deemed most worthy of them. 
The prizes were always books, bearing Dr. Shelton's autograph on the 
fly leaf, and many of them are still cherished in loving memory of the 
giver and of the old days. 

St. Paul's (5uil5. 

St. Paul's Guild of the Parish of St. Paul's, Buffalo. 

a sketch, contributed by george alfred stringer. 

St. Paul's Guild was organized on the twenty-second day of February, 1874, by 
the members of St. Paul's Church, called together by the rector for that purpose, with 



Historical Notes, iSiy-igoj. 393 

the object — as the constitution broadly put it — "for associating the members of the 
church more closely in good works and to engage and labor more thoroughly to the 
glory of God and the advancement of His Church." 

The Rev. C. S. Hale, assistant minister of St. Paul's, was the first warden, but 
shortly after, having resigned from the parish, the new assistant, Rev. S. H. Gurteen, 
was elected to fill the vacancy. Dr. Davidson being vice-warden, with a registrar, 
treasurer and a full board of councilors. 

The first missionary work of the Guild was the establishment of what was long 
familiarly known as the " German Mission" on Spruce Street. A lot was purchased 
on the twenty-fourth of May, 1875, and a chapel was built at a cost of $1,700. This 
mission was several years ago incorporated, and became known as St. Andrew's Parish, 
which now has a new and beautiful church edifice on Goodell Street, completed in 
November, 1892, and opened for service the first Sunday in Advent ; the lot and old 
building on Spruce Street having been sold. 

When the Guild was first organized it only had a membership of forty-five, but at 
the close of the year it numbered one hundred and thirty-five associates, a larger 
number than that of all the churchmen in the city when our parish — St. Paul's — 
was organized. Early in 1874 the Ladies' Aid and Relief Society began work under the 
auspices of the Guild. An industrial school was established, and later on every depart- 
ment of church work was thoroughly organized and carried on successfully, to wit : 
the parish Sunday School, the Missionary Society, the floral decoration of the altar 
and chancel on Sundays and festival days, ushering and order, the Maternity Society, 
ecclesiastical work, etc. 

The Guild did an efficient and noble work up to May, 1888, when our church was 
partially destroyed by fire, just previous to which our rector. Rev. John W. Brown, 
D. D., had resigned the rectorship to assume a larger responsibility at St. Thomas's 
Church, New York, to which he had been called ; since which period the Guild, as 
an organization, practically ceased to exist. 

The record of the Guild of St. Paul's Church for fourteen consecutive years was 
one of which all its members had reason to be justly proud, and to which this brief 
sketch cannot do full justice. Much laborious work was done, old-time ease given 
up, and burdens shouldered ; this not by men and women of leisure, but those who 
had their every-day tasks and every-day duties to perform. 

One of the most self-denying of these, and one who died with his harness on, 
was our colaborer, the late Augustus Reginald Davidson, M. D. "Faithful unto 
death.'' 

As St. Paul's is the mother of the Episcopal churches in this city, so in a certain sense 
is the Guild the mother of a larger and more vigorous missionary spirit. The Lay- 
men's Missionary League, formed by members of the several city parishes in the fall 



394 History of St. Paul's Church. 

of 1891, is already a great power for good with every prospect before it of a long, 
useful and prosperous career. Its president, superintendent and treasurer are all 
former Guild members, as well as many of its present lay readers. " What wilt thou 
have me to do," is the Pauline cry constantly evoked from each member as the sense 
of Christ is realized, and the demands of Christ-work made known — and consecrated 
to this we shall find each year a glorious harvest of results to the glory of God and 
the good of the Catholic Church. 
Buffalo, N. Y., March 15, 1893. 



3from /iDinutes of tbe Butl&ing Committee, after 
jftre of 1888. 

September 4, 1888. — Amended plans of Robert W. Gibson, archi- 
tect, were accepted. 

November 8, 1888.— The building of the Church Street porch 
decided upon, at a cost of $3,006. The total expense of rebuilding 
was estimated at $113,496. 

January 7, 1889. — The new organ ordered from Hook & Hastings 
of Boston, to cost $4,800. It was decided to have stone tracery in 
chancel east window, to cost about $1,200. Mr. Gibson's designs for 
the altar rail accepted. 

January 29, 1889. — The estimates from Mr. Collingwood for stone 
work were as follows : 

For stone pulpit, . . ... . $1,500 

For marble font . 400 

For stone tracery in chancel east window, 1,250 

For stone rail for chancel 725 

For marble steps to chancel 250 

$4,125 

Mr. Collingwood offered to donate the font, and the estimates were 
accepted at the sum of $3,900, with the understanding that the font be 



Historical Notes, iSiy-igoj. 395 

donated, which would make the net sum $3,500. The designs by Mr. 
Gibson accepted. (Brown stone was used for the font.) 

March, 1889. — The Messrs. Lamb of New York to furnish all glass 
for the church with the exception of memorial windows. 

March 27, 1889. — It was reported that Mrs. Agnes Ethel Tracy 
had offered to give to the restored St. Paul's Church the altar and 
reredos as a memorial of the late Rev, Dr. Shelton, the whole not to 
exceed $7,000. The following resolution was offered, and a copy sent 
to Mrs. Tracy : 

"Resolved, That the building committee of St. Paul's Church, in behalf of the 
vestry and congregation, gratefully accept the very munificent offer made by Mrs. 
Agnes Fthel Tracy, and they also desire to express their gratification that the noble 
gift is to be devoted to the perpetuation of the blessed memory of the Rev. Wm. 
Shelton, D. D., formerly rector of the parish, whose name is so dear to the members 
of St. Paul's. 

April 4, 1889. — It was decided to accept Mr. Gibson's designs for 
chancel floor, chancel furniture, including stalls, bishop's chair, and 
credence table, and also the reredos. 

On motion of Dr. Hopkins it was resolved that all doors be made 
to swing outwards. 

June I, 1889. — Burke & Co. contracted with to lay the mosaic 
flooring of chancel, $1,600 : Metz & Meyer to make and set up chan- 
cel furniture, $2,677 ; Mr. Collingwood, onyx for altar, $4,575 ; Burke 
& Co., mosaic figures in reredos, $1,950. 

July I, 1889. — J. Edward N. Stendt, to do the mural decorating, 
at a cost not to exceed $4,000. 

October 16, 1889. — The credence table, after a design by Mr. Gib- 
son, contracted for, with Mr. Collingwood, at $250. 

The building committee of 1888 was as follows : Col. A. J. Barn- 
ard, Chairman ; Wm. H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson, Dr. H. R. 
Hopkins, James R. Smith, Robert P. Wilson, Treasurer ; George A. 
Stringer, Secretary. 



396 History of St. Paul's Church. 

3Ltst Of tbe Clergs \^ St. Paul's Cburcb. 
1817 to 1903. 

February 10, 1817. Rev. Samuel Johnston, Missionary. 
1817 to April 7, 1820. Rev. William A. Clark, Missionary and first Rector. 
May, 1820, to 1824. Rev. Deodatus Babcock, second Rector. 
March 30, 1825, to December 31, 1828. Rev. Addison Searle. third Rector. 
January to June, 1829. Rev. Reverard Kearney, fourth Rector. 
September 11, 1829, to January 11, 1881. Rev. William Shelton, D. D., fifth Rector ; 
and Honorary Rector from January 11, 1881, until his death, October 11, 1883. 
1861. Rev. Mr. Lynn, Assistant. 
September i, 1863, to October, 1867. Rev. Thomas Clapp Pitkin, 

D. D., Assistant. 
April, i86g, to April i, 1872. Rev. Charles L. Hutchins, Assistant. 
April, 1872, to March, 1875. Rev. Charles S. Hale, Assistant. 
November, 1875. Rev. S. Humphreys Gurteen, Assistant. 
March 6, 1877, to March 30, 1878. Rev. S. Humphreys Gurteen, 
Assistant Rector. March 30, 1878, to April 3, 1S80, Associate 
Rector. 
1880 to 1882. Rev. Edward Ingersoll, D. D., Assistant; Rev. C. 
F. A. BiELBY and Rev. William Marvin Jones, Assistants. 
May 7, 1882, to June I, 1888. Rev. John W. Brown, D. D., sixth Rector ; Rev. 
John Huske and Rev. C. H. Brent, Assistants. 

June I, 1888, to May 11, 1889. Rev. John Huske, Minister-in-charge. 
May II to October 15, 1889. Rev. G. Mott Williams, Minister-in-charge. 
October 15, 1889, to March i, 1892. Rev. Henry A. Adams, seventh Rector ; 
Rev. Arthur J. Fidler, Assistant. 

March i, 1892, to April 30, 1892. Rev. Arthur J. Fidler, Minister-in-charge. 

July 5, 1892. Rev. J. A. Regester, S. T. D., eighth Rector ; Rev. N. S. Stevens, 
Assistant, November, 1892, to August, 1895 ; Rev. John S. Littell, Curate, 
November, 1895, to November 15, i8gg; Rev. Coleman E. Byram, Ph. D., 
Curate, from November 15, 1899, to October i, 1902 ; Rev. Mark H. Milne, 
Curate, from October i, 1902. 



List of the J^estrj, iSij-igoj. 397 

Xist of martens anb IDestr^men of St. Paul's 
Cburcb, Buffalo, from 1817 to 1903. 

Names arranged in the order in which they appear in the records. 



February lo, 1817, to Easter, 1817. 

WARDENS. 

Erastus Granger, Isaac Q. Leake. 

VESTRYMEN. 
Samuel Tupper, John G. Camp, Jonas Harrison, 

Sheldon Thompson, Henry M. Campbell, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge. 

Elias Ransom, John S. Larned, 

Easter, 181 7, to Easter, 1818. 

WARDENS. 

Erastus Granger, Isaac Q. Leake. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Samuel Tupper, Henry M. Campbell, Jonas Harrison, 

Elias Ransom, John S. Larned, John G. Camp. 

Sheldon Thompson, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge, 

Easter, 18 18, to Easter, 181 9. 

WARDENS. 

Isaac Q. Leake, Henry M. Campbell. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John S. Larned, John G. Camp, William J. Caldwell, 

Sheldon Thompson, Jonas Harrison, Staley N. Clarke. 

Elias Ransom, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge, 

Easter, 1819, to Easter, 1820. 

WARDENS. 

Dr. Cyrenius Chapin, Henry M. Campbell. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Dr. Josiah Trowbridge, Oliver Forward, William J. Caldwell, 

Elias Ransom, Jonas Harrison, Smith H. Salisbury. 

John G. Camp, Sheldon Thompson, 

Frederick B. Merrill, Clerk. 



398 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Easter, 1820, to Easter, 1821. 

WARDENS. 

Dr. Cyrenius Chapin, Henry M. Campbell. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Elias Ransom, Smith H. Salisbury, George Weed, 

Oliver Forward, John G. Camp, Henry Kip. 

Sheldon Thompson, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge, 

Roswell Chapin, Clerk. 



Easter, 182 1, to Easter, 1822. 

WARDENS. 
Henry M. Campbell, Henry Kip. 

VESTRYMEN. 
Smith H. Salisbury, Sheldon Thompson, Absalom Bull, 

Oliver Forward, George Weed, Horace Cunningham. 

Elias Ransom, Aaron James, 

Roswell Chapin, Clerk. Oliver Forward, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1822, to Easter, 1823. 

WARDENS. 
Henry M. Campbell, Henry Kip. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Elias Ransom, Smith H. Salisbury, George Weed, 

Oliver Forward, Sheldon Thompson, Henry Hamilton. 

Joseph D. Hoyt, Horace Cunningham, 

Roswell Chapin, Clerk. Oliver Forward, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1823, to Easter, 1824, 

WARDENS. 

Henry M. Campbell, George B. Webster. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Joseph D. Hoyt, Thomas B. Clarke, Jacob A. Barker, 

Elias Ransom, Sheldon Ball, John G. Camp. 

Smith H. Salisbury, Lester Brace, 

Roswell Chapin, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 



List of the Vestry, 1817-igoj. 399 

Easter, 1824, to Easter, 1825. 

WARDENS. 

Henry M. Campbell, George B. Webster. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Elias Ransom, Smith H. Salisbury, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge, 

John G. Camp, Sheldon Ball, Manly Colton. 

Joseph D. Hoyt, Jacob A. Barker, 

Roswell Chapin, Clerk. 

Easter, 1825, to Easter, 1826. 

WARDENS. 

Henry M. Campbell, George B. Webster. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Elias Ransom, Joseph D. Hoyt, Sheldon Ball, 

Dr. Josiah Trowbridge, Guy H. Goodrich, John G. Camp. 

Manly Colton, Jacob A. Barker, 

Roswell Chapin, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 

Loring Peirce appointed sexton. 

Easter, 1826, to Easter, 1827. 

WARDENS. 

Henry M. Campbell, George B. Webster. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Jacob A. Barker, J. J. Ulman, Anthony Beers, 

William Williams, Benjamin Rathbun, Sylvester Matthews. 

Russell H. Heywood, Henry Hamilton, 

June 13, 1826, Henry il, Campbell having removed to Detroit, Dr. Josiah Trow- 
bridge was elected warden in his place. 

O. S.Lyon, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1827, to Easter, 1828. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Dr. Henry R. Stagg, William Williams, Anthony Beers, 

John G. Camp, Russell H. Heywood, Sylvester Matthews. 

Jacob A. Barker, Benjamin Rathbun, 

Dyre Tillinghast, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 



400 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Easter, 1828, to Easter,- 1829 

WARDENS. 
George B. Webster, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Jacob A. Barker, John W. Beals, John G. Camp, 

Russell H. Heywood, John Lay, Jr., William Williams. 

Guy H. Goodrich, Cyrus Athearn, 

Dyre Tillinghast, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1829, to Easter, 1830. 

WARDENS. 
George B. Webster, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge. 

VESTRYMEN. 
Russell H. Heywood, Jerry Radcliff, Augustine Eaton, 

William Williams, Manly Colton, Jacob A. Barker. 

John W. Beals, Henry Hamilton, 

Dyre Tillinghast, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1830, to Easter, 1831. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Sheldon Thompson, Jerry Radcliff, Zenas W. Barker, 

Pierre A. Barker, John R. Carpenter, Dyre Tillinghast. 

Henry Hamilton, Cyrus Athearn, 

Martin Chittenden, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer 

Easter, 1831, to Easter, 1832. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood. 

VESTRYMEN. 
Henry Hamilton, Pierre A. Barker, Jeremiah Staats, 

Zenas W. Barker, Cyrus Athearn, Sheldon Thompson. 

Jerry Radcliff, Benjamin Rathbun, 

Martin Chittenden, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 



List of the Vestry, iSiy-igoj. 401 

Easter, 1832, to Easter, 1833. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Henry Hamilton, Guy H. Goodrich, Zenas W. Barker, 

Sheldon Thompson, Sylvester Matthews, John Lay, Jr. 

Jacob A. Barker, Benjamin Rathbun, 

Martin Chittenden, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 

September 25, 1832, Henry Morris appointed clerk in place of Martin Chittenden, 
deceased. 

Easter, 1833, to Easter, 1834. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Sheldon Thompson, Jacob A. Barker, George E. Hayes, 

Guy H. Goodrich, William B. Rochester, Henry Hamilton. 

Pierre A. Barker, Lester Brace, 

Henry Morris, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 

Stephen Walker, Superintendent of Sunday School. 

Easter, 1834, to Easter, 1835. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Sheldon Thompson, William B. Rochester, Henry Hamilton, 

Pierre A. Barker, Lester Brace, Sylvester Matthews. 

Jacob A. Barker, George E. Hayes, 

Henry Morris, Clerk, George B. Webster, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1835,10 Easter, 1836. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Henry Hamilton. 

VESTRYMEN. 

William B. Rochester, Sylvester Matthews, Pierre A. Barker, 

Sheldon Thompson, George E. Hayes, Jacob A. Barker. 

Lester Brace, Horatio Stevens, 

Dr. Elliott Burwell, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 



402 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Easter, 1836, to Easter, 1837. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Henry Hamilton. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Jacob A. Barker, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge, George E. Hayes, 

Pierre A. Barker, Guy H. Goodrich, Richard Sears. 

Sheldon Thompson, Russell H. Heywood, 

Elijah Ford, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1837, to Easter, 1838. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Henry Hamilton. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Sheldon Thompson, Russell H. Heywood, Stephen Walker, 

Dr. Josiah Trowbridge, George E. Hayes, Lester Brace. 

Jacob A. Barker, William Williams, 

Elijah Ford, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1838, to Easter, 1839. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Henry Hamilton. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Russell H. Heywood, George E. Hayes, Jacob A. Barker, 

Lester Brace, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge, William Williams. 

Stephen Walker, Sheldon Thompson, 

Elijah Ford, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1839, to Easter, 1840. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Henry Hamilton. 

VESTRYMEN. 

William Williams, Walter Joy, Sheldon Thompson, 

Russell H. Heywood, Stephen Walker, Dr. James P. White. 

Elijah Ford, Lester Brace, 

Joseph G. Hasten, Clerk. George B. Webster, Treasurer. 



List of the Vestry, iSiy-igoj. 403 

Easter, 1840, to Easter, 1841. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Henry Hamilton. 

VESTRYMEN. 

William Williams, Walter Joy, Sheldon Thompson, 

Russell H. Hey wood, Stephen Walker, Dr. James P. White. 

Elijah Ford, Lester Brace, 

Joseph G. Hasten, Clerk. 



Easter, 1841, to Easter, 1842. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Henry Hamilton. 

VESTRYMEN. 

William Williams, Walter Joy, Dr. James P. White, 

Russell H. Heywood, Stephen Walker, Joseph G. Masten. 

Elijah Ford, Lester Brace, 

Jesse Walker, Clerk. William Williams, Treasurer. 



Easter, 1842, to Easter, 1843. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Henry Hamilton. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Russell H. Heywood, Walter Joy, William Williams, 

Stephen Walker, Lester Brace, Edward S. Warren. 

Joseph G. Masten, Elijah Ford, 

Jesse Walker, Clerk. William Williams, Treasuret. 

Easter, 1843, to Easter, 1844. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Henry Hamilton. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Russell H. Heywood, William Williams, Richard Sears, 

Lester Brace, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge, Elijah Ford. 

Stephen Walker, Jacob A. Barker, 

Jesse Walker, Clerk. William Williams, Treasurer. 



404 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Easter, 1844, to Easter, 1845. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Henry Hamilton. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Russell H. Heywood, William Williams, Richard Sears, 

Lester Brace, Dr. Josiah Trowbridge, Elijah Ford. 

Stephen Walker, Jacob A. Barker, 

Jesse Walker, Clerk. William Williams, Treasurer. 

Henry Hawkins, Sexlon. 

Easter, 1845, to Easter, 1846. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Henry Hamilton. 

VESTRYMEN. 

William Williams, Jacob A. Barker, Alexander H. Caryl, 

Lester Brace, Elijah Ford, Stephen Walker. 

Russell H. Heywood, Albert Hayden, 

Asher P. Nichols, Clerk. William Williams, Treasurer. 

February, 1846. — Russell H. Heywood, Albert Hayden, Grosvenor Clark, Build- 
ing Committee for the erection of the rectory on Pearl Street. 

Easter, 1846, to Easter, 1847. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood. 

VESTRYMEN. 

William Williams, Elijah Ford, Samuel D. Flagg, 

Lester Brace, Albert Hayden, Stephen Walker. 

Alexander H. Caryl, Grosvenor Clark, 

Asher P. Nichols, Clerk. William Williams, Treasurer, 

George C. Webster, DeWitt C. Weed, William H. Walker, the first committee 
appointed to seat strangers in the church. 



List of the Vestry, i8iy~igoj. 405 

Easter, 1847, to Easter, 1848. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood. 

VESTRYMEN. 

William Williams, Stephen Walker, Grosvdnor Clark, 

Lester Brace, Samuel D. Flagg, Henry Hagar. 

Elijah Ford, Albert Hayden, 

Asher P. Nichols, Clerk. William Williams, Treasurer. 

January, 1848.— George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood, William Williams, 
committee to correspond with Richard Upjohn, the architect, in regard to furnish- 
ing plans for new church edifice. 

Easter, 1848, to Easter, 1849. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood. 

VESTRYMEN. 
William Williams, Stephen Walker, John L. Kimberly, 

Samuel D. Flagg, Lester Brace, Edward L. Stevenson 

Henry Hagar, Elijah Ford, 

Charles W. Evans, Clerk. William Williams, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1849, to Easter, 1850. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lester Brace, Stephen Walker, Edward L. Stevenson, 

William Williams, John L. Kimberly, Elijah Ford. 

Samuel D. Flagg, Henry Hagar, 

Charles W. Evans, Clerk. William Williams, Treasurer. 

Russell H. Heywood, Edward L. Stevenson, George B. Webster, William Wil- 
liams, and Jacob A. Barker, Building Committee for the erection of the new church 
edifice. 

August 20, 1849. — ^Jacob A. Barker appointed Treasurer, and DeWitt C. Weed 
one of the Building Committee in place of William Williams, deceased. 



406 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Easter, 1850, to Easter, 185 1. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lester Brace, Henry Hager, Elijah Ford, 

John L. Kimberly, Samuel D. Flagg, Edward S. Warren. 

Stephen Walker, Edward L. Stephenson, 

Charles W. Evans, Clerk. Jacob A. Barker, Treasurer. 

Richard Barker, Sexton. 

Russell H. Heywood, Edward L. Stevenson, George B. Webster, Jacob A. 
Barker, DeWitt C. Weed, Building Committee. 



Easter, 1851, to Easter, 1852. 

WARDENS, 

George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lester Brace, Henry Hager, Elijah Ford, 

John L. Kimberly, Samuel D. Flagg, Edward S. Warren. 

Stephen Walker, Edward L. Stevenson, 

Charles W. Evans, Clerk. Jacob A. Barker, Treasure] . 

Russell H. Heywood, Edward L. Stevenson, George B. Webster, Jacob A. 
Barker, DeWitt C. Weed, Building Committee. 



Easter, 1852, to Easter, 1853. 
(First election in the new church edifice.) 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lester Brace, Samuel D. Flagg, Benjamin Bradley, 

Elijah Ford, Edward S. Warren, George E. Hayes. 

John L. Kimberly, Amos I. Mathews, 

Charles W. Evans, Clerk. Jacob A. Barker, Treasurer. 



List of the Vestry, i8iy-igoj. 407 

Easter, 1853, to Easter, 1854. 

WARDENS. 

George B. Webster, Russell H. Heywood. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lester Brace, Samuel D. Flagg, Benjamin Bradley, 

Elijah Ford, Edward S. Warren, George E. Hayes. 

John L. Kimberly, Amos I. Mathews, 

Charles W. Evans, Clark. Jacob A. Barker, Treasurer. 

William Channon, Sexton. 

Easter, 1854, to Easter, 1855. 

WARDENS. 

Kussell H. Heywood, Lester Brace. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Elijah Ford, John S. Ganson, Benjamin Bradley, 

Henry Hagar, Israel T. Hatch, Amos I. Mathews. 

Albert H. Tracy, George E. Hayes, 

Charles W. Evans, Clerk and Treasurer of the Parish. 

(Albert H. Tracy having declined to act as vestryman, Charles W. Evans was 
elected in his place. May 22, 1854.) 

John L. Kimberly and Jacob A. Barker, Building Committee for building the 
porches, stone steps, and main tower of church. 

Easter, 1855, to Easter, 1856. 

WARDENS. 

Russell H. Heywood, Lester Brace. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Elijah Ford, John S. Ganson, George E. Hayes, 

Charles W. Evans, Samuel G. Cornell, John T. Lacy. 

John Pease, Henry K. Viele, 

Charles W. Evans, Clerk and Treasurer. 



4o8 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Easter, 1856, to Easter, 1857. 

WARDENS. 

Russell H. Hey wood, Lester Brace. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Elijah Ford, John S. Ganson, George E. Hayes, 

Charles W. Evans, Samuel G. Cornell, DeWitt C. Weed. 

John Pease, Henry K. Viele, 

Charles W. Evans, Clerk and Treasurer. 
John L. Kimberly and Jacob A. Barker, Building Committee, removing partition 
between chapel and main edifice, etc. 

Easter, 1857, to Easter, 1858. 

WARDENS. 

Russell H. Heywood, Lester Brace. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Elijah Ford, DeWitt C. Weed, Samuel G. Cornell, 

John S. Ganson, John Pease, George E. Hayes. 

Henry K. Viele, Charles W. Evans, 

Charles W. Evans, Clerk and Treasurer. Ralph Williams, Sexton. 

Easter, 1858, to Easter, 1859. 

WARDENS. 

Russell H. Heywood, Lester Brace. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John S. Ganson, Hunting S. Chamberlain, Dr. Thomas F. Rochester, 

William H. Walker, John T. Lacy, Walter Joy. 

Asher P. Nichols, John D. Shepard, 

William Sutton, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1859, to Easter, i860. 

WARDENS. 

Russell H. Heywood, Lester Brace. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John S. Ganson, Hunting S. Chamberlain, Dr. Thomas F. Rochester, 

William H. Walker, John T. Lacy, Walter Joy. 

Asher P. Nichols, John D. Shepard 

John T. Lacy, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer. 



List of the Vestry, iSi'j-igoj. 409 

Easter, i860, to Easter, 1861. 

WARDENS. 

Russell H. Heywood, Lester Brace. 

VESTRYMEN. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson, Erastus B. Seymour, 

John T. Lacy, Charles W. Evans, Dr. Cornelius C. Wyckoff. 

Walter Joy, Edward M . Atwater, 

John T. Lacy, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer. 

Easter, 186 1, to Easter, 1862. 

WARDENS. 

Russell H. Heywood, Lester Brace. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Walter Joy, Carlos Cobb, Asher P. Nichols, 

John S. GansoD, William H. Walker, Charles W. Evans. 

Erastus B. Seymour, Edward M. Atwater, 

John B. Eaton, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1862, to Easter, 1863. 

WARDENS. 

Russell H. Heywood, Lester Brace. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Erastus B. Seymour, William H. Walker, Edward M. Atwater, 

Charles W. Evans, Walter Joy, Seth H. Grosvenor. 

Asher P. Nichols, John S. Ganson, 

John B. Eaton, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer. 

(John B. Seymour appointed Clerk September 26, 1862, John B. Eaton having resigned.) 
Easter, 1863, to Easter, 1864. 

WARDENS. 

Lester Brace, Charles W. Evans. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Erastus B. Seymour, Samuel G. Cornell, Seth H. Grosvenor, 

Asher P. Nichols, William H. Walker, Lauren C. Woodruff. 

DeWitt C. Weed, Walter Joy, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer. 



4IO History of St. Paul's Church. 

Easter, 1864, to Easter, 1865. 

WARDENS. 

Lester Brace, Charles W. Evans. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lauren C. Woodruff, Samuel G. Cornell, Edwin Hurlbert, 

Asher P. Nichols, Dr. Thomas F. Rochester, George E. Hayes. 

William H. Walker, James W. Brown, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer. 



Easter, 1865, to Easter, 1866. 

WARDENS. 

Lester Brace, Charles W. Evans. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lauren C. Woodruff, Samuel G. Cornell, Edwin Hurlbert, 

Asher P. Nichols, George S. Hazard, James W. Brown. 

William H. Walker, Dr. Thomas F. Rochester, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer. 



Easter, 1866, to Easter, 1867. 

WARDENS. 

Lester Brace, Charles W. Evans. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lauren C. Woodruff, Samuel G. Cornell, William H. Walker, 

Asher P. Nichols, James Sweeney, Dr. Thomas F. Rochester. 

Edwin Hurlbert, James W. Brown, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer. 

Samuel G. Cornell, Charles W. Evans, Edwin Hurlbert, James W. Brown, DeWitt 
C. Weed, Building Committee, to complete the church edifice, spire on main tower, etc. 



List of the Vestry, i8iy-igoj. 411 

Easter, 1867, to Easter, 1868. 

WARDENS. 

Lester Brace, Charles W. Evans. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Samuel G. Cornell, Dr. Thomas F. Rochester, James Sweeney, 

Lauren C. Woodruff, Asher P. Nichols, James W, Brown. 

William H. Walker, John T. Lacy, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer . 

Samuel G. Cornell, Charles W. Evans, Lauren C. Woodruff, James W. Brown, 
DeWitt C. Weed, Building Committee. 



Easter, 1868, to Easter, 1869. 

WARDENS. 

Lester Brace, Charles W. Evans. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lauren C. Woodruff, John T. Lacy, John Pease, 

William H. Walker, James Sweeney, Henry C. Squire. 

Samuel G. Cornell, George S. Hazard, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer. 

Samuel G. Cornell, Charles W. Evans, Lauren C. Woodruff, DeWitt C. Weed, 
and George S. Hazard, Building Committee. 



Easter, 1869, to Easter, 1870. 

WARDENS. 

Lester Brace, Charles W. Evans. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lauren C. Woodruff, James Sweeney, John Pease, 

Samuel G. Cornell, A. Porter Thompson, George S. Hazard. 

William H. Walker, John T. Lacy, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer. 



412 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Easter, 1870, to Easter, 187 1. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, Samuel G. Cornell. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lauren C. Woodruff, James Sweeney, John Pease, 

William H. Walker, Cyrus Clarke, John L. Kimberly, Jr. 

A. Porter Thompson, John T. Lacy, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. DeWitt C. Weed, Treasurer, 

Charles W. Evans, Lauren C. Woodruff, DeWitt C.Weed, Cyrus Clarke, Building 
Committee, to complete the main spire, etc. 



Easter, 1871, to Easter, 1872. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, Lauren C. Woodruff. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Cyrus Clarke, Mark B. Moore, Henry T. Gillett, 

John T. Lacy, George Beals, Dr. C. C. Wyckoff. 

Howard H. Baker, George H. Smith, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. George Beals, Treasurer. 

Charles W. Evans, L. C. Woodruff, Building Committee, to complete spire of small 
tower of church, also the stone crosses, finials, etc. 

(George Beals resigned as treasurer, and James W. Sanford was chosen in his 
place, September 21, 1872.) 

Easter, 1872, to Easter, 1873. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lauren C. Woodruff, Cyrus Clarke, George F. Lee, 

Samuel G. Cornell, Howard H. Baker, George Beals. 

John Pease, George S. Hazard, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 



List of the Vestry, 1817-igioj. 413 



Easter, 1873, to Easter, 1874. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, Samuel G. Cornell. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lauren C. Woodruff, George S. Hazard, Howard H. Baker 

Cyrus Clarke, John Pease, George Seals. 

William H. Walker, George F. Lee, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1874, to Easter, 1875. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lauren C. Woodruff, Howard H. Baker, DeWitt C. Weed, 

George S. Hazard, John Pease, Cyrus Clarke. 

Mark B. Moore, George Beals, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1875, to Easter, 1876. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN, 

Lauren C. Woodruff, George Beals, George S. Hazard, 

Cyrus Clarke, Mark B. Moore, James Sweeney. 

John Pease, Howard H. Baker, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1876, to Easter, 1877. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Lauren C. Woodruff, Mark B. Moore, D. C. Godwin, 

Cyrus Clarke, George S. Hazard, Augustus R. Davidson. 

John Pease, Howard H. Baker, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 



414 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Easter, 1877, to Easter, 1878. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Cyrus Clarke, George S. Hazard, Augustus R. Davidson, 

Lauren C. Woodruff, Mark B. Moore, A. Porter Thompson. 

John Pease, Howard H. Baker, 

John B. Seymour, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 

(George B. Dudley elected clerk, September 7, 1877, in place of John B. Seymour, 
deceased.) 

Easter, 1878, to Easter, 1879. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Cyrus Clarke, George S. Hazard, Dr. Augustus R. Davidson, 

Lauren C. Woodruff, Mark B. Moore, A. Porter Thompson. 

John Pease, Howard H. Baker, 

George B. Dudley, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 



Easter, 1879, to Easter, 1880. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Lauren C. Woodruff, Mark B. Moore, 

Dr. Augustus R. Davidson, George S. Hazard, Cyrus Clarke. 

A. Porter Thompson, 
(Seven vestrymen only. See note foot of page 123.) 

William Y. Warren, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 



List of the Vestry, iSi^-igoj. 415 

Easter, 1880, to Easter, 1881. 

WARDENS. 
Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Dr. Augustus R. Davidson, Howard H. Baker, 

A. Porter Thompson, Henry R. Howland, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins. 

Albert J. Barnard, George Alfred Stringer, 

William Y. Warren, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 

Robert Wilkinson, Sexton. 

(May 6, i88o, Theodore F. Welch elected clerk in place of William Y. Warren, 
resigned.) 

Easter, 1881, to Easter, 1882. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Dr. Augustus R. Davidson, Howard H. Baker, 

A. Porter Thompson, George Alfred Stringer, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins. 

Albert J. Barnard, Henry R. Howland, 

Theodore F. Welch, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 



Easter, 1882, to Easter, 1883. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, George Alfred Stringer, 

A. Porter Thompson, Dr. Augustus R. Davidson, Albert J. Barnard. 

Howard H. Baker, Henry R. Howland, 

Theodore F. Welch, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 



41 6 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Easter, 1883, to Easter, 1884. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, George Alfred Stringer, 

A. Porter Thompson, Dr. Augustus R. Davidson, Albert J. Barnard. 

Howard H. Baker, Henry R. Howland, 

Theodore F. Welch, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1884, to Easter, 1885. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker., 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, George Alfred Stringer, 

A. Porter Thompson, Dr. Augustus R. Davidson, Albert J. Barnard. 

James R. Smith, Robert P. Wilson, 

Theodore F. Welch, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1885, to Easter, 1886. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Dr. Augustus R. Davidson, Robert P. Wilson, 

A. Porter Thompson, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, Albert J. Barnard. 

James R. Smith, George Alfred Stringer, 

G. Hunter Bartlett, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1886, to Easter, 1887. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Dr. Augustus R. Davidson, Robert P. Wilson, 

A. Porter Thompson, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, Albert J. Barnard. 

James R. Smith, George Alfred Stringer, 

G. Hunter Bartlett, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 



List of the Vestry, iSiy-igoj. 417 

Easter, 1887, to Easter, 1888. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Dr. Augustus R. Davidson, Robert P. Wilson, 

A. Porter Thompson, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, Albert J. Barnard. 

James R. Smith, George Alfred Stringer, 

G. Hunter Bartlett, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1888, to Easter, 1889. 

WARDENS. 

Charles W. Evans, William H. Walker. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Dr. Augustus R. Davidson, Robert P. Wilson, 

A. Porter Thompson, Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, Albert J. Barnard. 

James R. Smith, George Alfred Stringer, 

G. Hunter Bartlett, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 

Albert J. Barnard, William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson, Dr. Henry R. Hop- 
kins, Robert P. Wilson, George A. Stringer, James R. Smith, Building Committee, in 
rebuilding the church after the fire of May 10, 1888. Charles W. Evans, senior 
warden, died February 8, 1889. 

Easter, 1889, to Easter, 1890. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, George Alfred Stringer, James Sweeney, 

James R. Smith, Robert P. Wilson, Edmund Hayes. 

Dr. Henry R. Hopkins, Albert J. Barnard, 

G. Hunter Bartlett, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 

William Graveson, Sexlon. 

Easter, 1890, to Easter, 1891. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, George Alfred Stringer, James Sweeney, 

James R. Smith, Robert P. Wilson, Edmund Hayes. 

Dr Henry R. Hopkins, Albert J. Barnard, 

G. Hunter Bartlett, Clerk. James W. Sanford, Treasurer. 



41 8 History of St. Paul's Church. 

Easter, 1891, to Easter, 1892. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, James R. Smith, James Sweeney, 

Albert J. Barnard, Robert P. Wilson, Sheldon T. Viele. 

George Alfred Stringer, Edmund Hayes, 

G. Hunter Bartlett, Clerk. Philip Joyce, Treasurer. 

(February g, 1892, Charles R. Wilson elected clerk in place of G. Hunter Bartlett, 
resigned.) 

Easter, 1892, to Easter, 1893. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, James R. Smith, James Sweeney, 

Albert J. Barnard, Robert P. Wilson, Sheldon T. Viele. 
George Alfred Stringer, Edmund Hayes, 

Charles R. Wilson, Clerk. Philip Joyce, Treasurer. 

(July I, 1892, William A. Joyce appointed treasurer in place of Philip Joyce, 
resigned.) 

Easter, 1893, to Easter, 1894. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele, 

Albert J. Bernard, Edmund Hayes, Hobart Weed. 

George Alfred Stringer, James Sweeney, 

Charles R. Wilson, Clerk. William A. Joyce, Treasurer. 

Lorenzo Harris, Sexton. 

Easter, 1894, to Easter, 1895. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Edmund Hayes, Sheldon T. Viele, 

Albert J. Barnard, James Sweeney, Hobart Weed. 

James R. Smith, Charles R. Wilson, 

Charles R. Wilson, Clerk. William A. Joyce, Treasurer. 



List of the Vestry, i8i'j~igoj. 41Q 

Easter, 1895, to Easter, 1896. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Edmund Hayes, Hobart Weed, 

Albert J. Barnard, James Sweeney, Charles R. Wilson. 

James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele, 

Charles R. Wilson, Clerk. William A. Joyce, Treasurer. 

Easter, 1896, to Advent, 1896. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, James Sweeney, Hobart Weed, 

Albert J. Barnard, Sheldon T. Viele, Charles R. Wilson. 

Edmund Hayes, James R. Smith, 

Charles R. Wilson, Clerk. William A. Joyce, Treasurer. 

Advent, 1896, to Advent, 1897. 

(Vestry elected on the Monday after the First Sunday in Advent, November 30, 
1896, being the first election under the new rule. See page 202.) 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Edmund Hayes, Hobart Weed. 

Albert J. Barnard, James Sweeney, Charles R. Wilson, 

James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele, Dr. M. D. Mann. 

Charles R. Wilson, Clerk. W. A. Joyce, Treasurer. 

Advent, 1897, to Advent, 1898. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Edmund Hayes, Hobart Weed, 

Albert J. Barnard, James Sweeney, Charles R. Wilson, 

James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele, Dr. M. D. Mann. 

Charles R. Wilson, aerk. W. A. Joyce, Treasurer. 



420 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



Advent, 1898, to Advent, 1899. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Edmund Hayes, 

Albert J. Barnard, James Sweeney, 

James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele, 

Charles R. Wilson, Clerk. 



Hobart Weed, 
Charles R. Wilson, 
Dr. M. D. Mann. 
W. A. Joyce, Treasurer. 



Advent, 1899, to Advent, 1900. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson, 

VESTRYMEN. 

John Pease, Edmund Hayes, 

Albert J. Barnard, James Sweeney, 

James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele, 

Charles R. Wilson, Clerk. 



Hobart Weed, 
Charles R. Wilson, 
Dr. M. D. Mann. 
W. A. Joyce, Treasurer. 



Advent, 1900, to Advent, 1901. 

WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson. 

VESTRYMEN. 

Albert J. Barnard, James Sweeney, 

James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele, 

Edmund Hayes, Hobart Weed, 

Charles R. Wilson, Clerk. 



Charles R. Wilson, 
Dr. M. D. Mann, 
John R. H. Richmond. 
W. A. Joyce, Treasurer. 



Advent, 1901, to Advent, 1902. 



WARDENS. 

William H. Walker, A. Porter Thompson 

VESTRYMEN. 

Albert J. Barnard, James Sweeney, 

James R. Smith, Sheldon T. Viele, 

Edmund Hayes, Hobart Weed, 



Charles R. Wilson, 
Dr. M. D. Mann, 
John R. H. Richmond. 



Charles R. Wilson, Clerk. 



W. A. Joyce, Treasurer. 



Advent, 1902, to Advent, 1903. 

No changes in vestry at election, held Advent, December i, 1902. 

William H. Walker, senior warden, died January 4, 1903. January 12, 1903, the 

vestry elected Charles R. Wilson, vestryman, as warden, and E. Howard Hutchinson 

as vestryman. John K. Walker was elected clerk of the vestry and John M. 

Provoost, treasurer. 



The Architects of St. Paul's. 421 

Ube Hrcbitects of St. Paul's. 

1819-1890. 

John Stacy appears to have been the master builder of the original 
frame church in 1819-1821. No architect is mentioned. The builder 
probably acted as such, as was customary in those early days. 

The plans for lengthening the church, increasing the height of the 
tower, and minor changes, in the year 1828, were made by Joseph 
Stow. 

Richard Upjohn, Sr., of New York City, the architect of Trinity 
Church, New York, was the architect of the new stone edifice, begun 
in 1849, from that date to the completion of the building in 1873. 

Richard Upjohn was born at Shaftesbury, England, on the 2 2d of 
January, 1802. He came to America in 1829, bringing with him his 
family, his son, Richard M. Upjohn, being then one year old. He 
settled first at New Bedford, Mass., and in 1833 removed to Boston, 
soon after which he designed the entrance gateways of Boston Com- 
mon. Before beginning his career as an architect, he had received a 
thorough technical training and practical experience as a master builder. 
In 1839, he was called to New York City to take charge of some 
proposed alterations in Trinity Church, but it was decided instead 
to build an entirely new edifice, and the commission was entrusted to 
Mr. Upjohn. The new Trinity, completed in 1846, was conceded to 
be the most beautiful church building in the United States, and it 
made his name famous. 

Among many other important buildings designed and built by him, 
are St. Thomas's Church, Trinity Chapel, the Church of the Holy 
Communion, the Corn Exchange Bank, and Trinity Building, New 
York City ; Christ and Grace Churches, and Church of the Pilgrims, 
Brooklyn, N. Y.; and St. Mary's Church, Burlington, N. J. 

In April, 1849, the rector and vestry of St. Paul's decided to adopt 
the plans for the new church furnished by Mr. Upjohn, and the work 



422 History of St. Paul's Church. 

was forthwith begun. The general direction of the construction was 
carried on by correspondence with the building committees, from Mr. 
Upjohn's office in New York, and he made a number of trips to Buf- 
falo in order to inspect the progress of the work. These letters show 
that there was no minutest point about the building and finishing of 
the church with which Mr. Upjohn was not familiar, and which he did 
not direct. The actual work was done under the superintendence of 
men recommended by him. Thomas R. Williams, who had been in a 
similar responsible position in the building of other of Mr. Upjohn's 
churches (page 56), being engaged to look after the stone-work ; and 
George Riker, whom he considered as well qualified for his important 
position as Mr. Williams for his, was engaged to superintend all wood- 
work. (Page 57.) In 1854, when it was decided to resume work on 
the tower, porches, etc., Wx. Williams being in England, the committee 
engaged Robert Harron to superintend, and, after his death, the work 
was looked after by John A. Lipp, who had been foreman under Mr. 
Harron. (For builders of spire, see pages 107, 121.) 

Mr. Upjohn's services as architect of St. Paul's extended over a 
period of twenty-four years, of course with intermissions, and all of the 
work was attended to personally by himself, with the exception of a 
few months in 1850, during a short absence in Europe, when his son, 
Richard M. Upjohn, advised whenever necessary. On his return he 
took his son into partnership, January i, 1851, the firm being then 
known as Upjohn & Co. He allowed much of the business of the 
firm to devolve upon the younger partner, but he himself continued to 
look after the work on St. Paul's. He felt an affectionate pride in the 
church, and it is even said that he considered it his masterpiece. 

Mr. Upjohn seems to have been very much in advance of his genera- 
tion in regard to the artistic possibilities of the building, especially in 
its minor details. He was most cheerfully seconded by Dr. Shelton 
and by members of the building committee. 

The period of the '50's was not noted for the excellence of its 
ideas on interior decoration, which makes the more noticeable Mr. 



The Architects of St. Paul's. 423 

Upjohn's own good taste. He had a genuine insight into the artistic 
fitness of things, and a sensitive feeling for harmony of color with form 
in the buildings he designed. 

His letters in regard to the effect of the proper use of stained glass 
in churches show this particularly. Having heard that some of the 
members of the congregation were intending to have their pews 
upholstered in whatever materials and colors they might fancy, he 
wrote a characteristic and justifiable letter of protest to Dr. Shelton, 
in September, 1851 : "People maybe as fantastic as they please in 
their dwellings, .... but in the Church of God they have no right 
to show off their follies, notwithstanding they may be owners of pews. 
I have usually covered the seats or cushions with good, plain crimson 
damask, — this contrasts well with the rich-toned black walnut. The 
color of the carpet is the same, the figure — if any — is small and fit- 
ting the architecture of the church." .... 

He always insisted, on what probably seemed strange to many at 
the time, that the architect had the right to control all the details of 
the church which he was laboring so devotedly to make, as he said, 
"a work of art," that should endure for long years to come. To the 
credit of all concerned, Mr.Upjohn's superior judgment was deferred to. 

Dr. Shelton's reference to Richard Upjohn, in his first sermon 
preached in the new church, November 2, 185 1, will be found at page 
75. Numerous other references to Mr. Upjohn are scattered through 
the earlier pages of this book. 

Bishop Coxe's Christian Ballads were first published in 1840, when 
Richard Upjohn was beginning his work on Trinity Church, New York. 
In the preface to a later edition of the Ballads, the Bishop thus refers 
to this earlier period : " The author must beg his readers to remember 
that many things which are now familiar to everybody in America 
were wholly unknown among us when these ballads were produced. 
Their author was obliged to imagine much that may now be seen in 
almost every part of the land. When he wrote them, there was not a 
church in the country which could sustain any other than the most 



424 History of St. Paul's Church. 

moderate pretensions to architectural correctness in design or decora- 
tion. He had never seen more than a few panes of stained glass in a 
church window, nor heard a complete chime ; and there was not to be 
seen, on this continent, so far as he is informed, an open roof, or a well- 
defined chancel, or genuine aisles, or a nave with a clerestory." . . . . 
Of "Trinity, New Church, Ascension Day, 1846," he wrote: — 

. " Not this a Gothic gazing-stock, 

Where nought is meant or told ; 
Translated into solid rock 

The prayer-book's self behold ! 
Sermons in stones ! Yes — more beside, 

A language, and a voice ! 
Much uttered — but far more implied 

That makes the heart rejoice. 

' ' Without — each little carving speaks 
Of Christ, the Crucified .... 

. . . To all the faithful — see, 

From porch to topmost tovfer, 
It telleth of the Trinity, 
And preacheth Christ with power ! " . 

Richard Upjohn's churches, although noted for the purity of their 
style, were not mere copies of foreign examples. 

His love for Gothic was inborn, his knowledge full. It was a part 
of his life. The spirit of the Old Master-Builders was upon him, and 
he put into his work an almost medieval ardor and originality. The 
building of a church was to him much more than the solving of 
an architectural problem — it as the creation of a House of God, for 
which nothing was more fit than the glorious architecture hallowed by 
the pious use of centuries. His civic buildings are usually in the style 
of the Italian Renaissance, but Gothic was the passion of his life. He 
was forty-seven years of age when St. Paul's was begun, in 1849, and 
when the last finial was put in place, in 1873, he had reached his sev- 
enty-second year. " 



The Architects of St. Paul's. 425 

Mr. Upjohn was one of the founders, and the first president of the 
American Institute of Architects, serving from its foundation in 1857 
to 1876. 

He died at his home at Garrison's-on-the-Hudson, August 16, 
1878, aged seventy-six years. 

His son, Richard M. Upjohn, has ably carried on the traditions of 
the firm. He has designed and built many beautiful churches, and 
was a pioneer in fireproof construction in New York. His chief work 
is the splendid Capitol at Hartford, Conn., which has the largest stone 
dome in the country. He was one of the founders of the New York 
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, and was president of 
that Chapter for 1892 and 1895. 

Robert W. Gibson of New York was the architect of the restored 
St, Paul's, after the fire of 1888. 

Robert Williams Gibson was born in 1854, at Essex, England, and 
was the son of Samuel Lodwick Gibson. Mr. Gibson was educated at 
Gravesend, England, and at the Royal Academy of Arts, London. 
He came to the United States in 1881, and in that year began the prac- 
tice of architecture at Albany, N. Y. In 1888 he removed to New York 
City. Among his more important works may be mentioned All Saints' 
Cathedral at Albany ; Christ Church, Rochester, N. Y. ; and in New 
York City, St. Michael's Church, the New York Clearing House, and 
the Botanical Museum. 

His work at St. Paul's Church was far more than a restoration, and 
involved very important changes and additions in the original design 
of Richard Upjohn, which were most, kilfully and harmoniously car- 
ried out. 

The aspect of the interior of the church has been much changed by 
Mr. Gibson, and has gained greatly in apparent size and impressiveness. 
The transepts, giving a cruciform effect, the stone columns and the 
clere-story, the stone vestry room and porch on Church Street, and the 
e.-larged and beautified chancel, are all due to his skill, and are all 
entirely in keeping with the origiral work. Mr. Gibson has planned 



426 History of St. Paul's Church. 

in complete and loyal sympathy with the original design of the 
church, of which he has made his work a development, carrying it on 
to greater beauty and perfection. 

A detailed description of Mr. Gibson's very successful remodeling 
of the edifice, and of the beautiful interior furnishings executed from 
his designs, will be found in the chapter in this volume entitled " The 
Restored St. Paul's." (Page 265.) 

Cyrus K. Porter & Son of Buffalo, the architects of Trinity Church, 
Buffalo, and of many other well-known buildings, acted as supervising 
architects during Mr. Gibson's work on St. Paul's. 

Subscrtptlon Xists. 

It should be mentioned that only the more important subscription 
lists are given here and elsewhere in this book. There were many 
minor lists for parish work, music, new organs, etc., which have not 
been transcribed here ; and, indeed, of much of the liberal giving of 
the parish no formal record is available. The first subscription, in 
1818, towards building the frame church, will be found at page 13. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR REBUILDING ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, 1848. 

The following subscription list for rebuilding St. Paul's Church, in 
1848, and the subsequent lists, are here given as they appear in the 
"red-bound book" which Dr. Shelton carried to the parishioners for 
their signatures : 

" We, the subscribers, do severally promise to pay to the Treasurer of St. Paul's 
Church, in the City of Buffalo, the sums set opposite our respective names, to be 
applied towards the building and completion of a church edifice, on the lot now 
owned by St. Paul's Church, after the plans furnished by Mr. Upjohn, or such other 
plans as he may furnish ; and for the payment of such subscriptions we severally 
agree, whenever forty-eight thousand dollars are subscribed hereto, to give our 
promissory notes for the amount of our respective subscriptions, payable at one of the 
banks in Buffalo in six equal payments, at four, eight, twelve, sixteen, twenty, and 
twenty-four months after the date thereof. 



Subscription Lists. 



427 



" The church when completed is to be consecrated and set apart exclusively as a 
place of public worship, according to the rites and ceremonies of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church of the United States of America ; and the subscribers hereto may become 
interested therein in the manner and upon the terms hereinafter specified ; to all of 
which the corporation above named, by the acceptance of our respective signatures to 
this subscription, declare their assent, and do bind themselves and their successors in 
office to the just and faithful performance of the same. 

"When the said church shall be completed, or sooner if the vestry shall deem it 
expedient, the vestry shall affix a valuation to each of the slips in it, except those 
reserved as free seats, and shall upon due notice offer the slips to which valuations are 
affixed for competition of choice at public auction, subject to such conditions and 
reservations as the vestry may deem proper for the future maintenance of public wor- 
ship therein, and to defray the contingent and other expenses of said corporation. 
At the time of giving the notes above specified, transferrable certificates shall be 
issued under the corporate seal, which certificates, when said notes shall be fully paid, 
shall entitle the holder to apply the same as cash in payment for slips in said church at 
the first public sale above specified ; and after the first public sale the holder of any 
such certificate may select any unsold slip at the valuation so affixed and apply the 
amount of such certificate, when fully paid, as cash in payment therefor, on such 
terms and conditions as the vestry shall prescribe ; but all such certificates not pre- 
sented or exchanged for slips within six months after the church shall be consecrated 
shall be deemed a donation to the church. 

Buffalo, July 8, 1848. 



R. H. Heywood $5 

William Williams (ist sub.), . 2 
John L. Kimberly, . . . i 
Mrs. Louisa M. Weed (stock), i 
Mrs. Louisa M.Weed (add. stock), i 

DeWitt C. Weed i 

Geo. Truscott 

Samuel D. Flagg, . , . 
Henry Hagar (ist sub.), 
Elijah Ford, . ... 

Lester Brace, . . 

I, T. Hatch, . • I ' 

Geo. E. Hayes 

John T. Lacy (in 3 years), . 



000.00 
,000.00 
500.00 
000.00 
,400.00 
,200.00 
500.00 
400.00 
,000.00 
800.00 
400 00 
000.00 
200.00 
500.00 
250.00 



A. E. Hart, . 

Wra. Sutton, . 

Robt. Hart, . . . 

A. Hayden (no notes), . 

Henry I. Warren (assumed by 
E. S. Warren), .... 

John D. Shepard, . , . 

John Hebard (ist sub.), 

Seth E. Sill 

Geo. N. Burwell, . . 

Henry H. Sizer, . 

Geo W. Bull, for self ; F. S. 
Wheeler and J. W. Sanford, 
$100 each, 

Sheldon Thompson (ist sub.). 



% 500.00 
200.00 
300.00 
400.00 

200.00 
400.00 
200.00 
500.00 
500.00 
500.00 



300.00 
1,000.00 



428 



History of St, Paul's Church. 



Henry K. Viele 

A. Porter Thompson, . . . 

Lydia Pomeroy, 

John Patterson, 

Stephen Walker (ist sub.), 

J. B. Bull 

S. B. Van de Venter, . . . 

Mrs. E. B. Mathews, . . . 

Sylvia Chapin, 

Wm. H. Walker (ist sub.), . 

Thos. Jones ($10 paid into 
Building Fund Society and 
credited on their books), . 

Samuel L. Meech, . . 

Thomas Savage, . . . 

Geo. J. Webb, . . . 

Nelson Willard (ist sub.), 

H. S. Chamberlain, . . 

Henry Hamilton, 

G. H. Goodrich, . . 

Elijah Ford (to be paid in 185 1), 

Henry Hagar (2d sub. , to be paid 
in 1851) 

James C. Evans, 

Ellicott Evans, 

H. K. Smith, 

Seth H. Grosvenor, .... 

E. S. Warren, 

Henry Moore, 

John Pease 

A. I. Mathews (ist sub.), . . 

G. R. Wilson 

James D. Sheppard (ist sub.), 

H. Colton 

Ira A. Blossom (ist sub.), . . 

A. H. Caryl (ist sub.), . . . 

Henry Wells ($10 paid into 
Building Fund Society and 
credited on their books), . 



$ 500.00 
500.00 
500.00 

1,000.00 
200.00 
300.00 
300.00 
200.00 
150.00 
100.00 



10.00 
100.00 
100.00 
200.00 
500.00 
200.00 
400.00 
300.00 
200.00 

500.00 
300.00 
300.00 
500.00 
300.00 
500.00 
200.00 
500.00 
250.00 
500.00 
400.00 
3S0.00 
500.00 
300.00 



Loring Peirce, .... 


% 10.00 


Henry Streater, .... 


200.00 


Abel Archer, 


50.00 


Austin Flint 


100.00 


Horatio Seymour, Jr., . . 


200.00 


Philo Dubois (ist sub.), . 


100.00 


Benjamin Brent (by W. S.), 


100.00 


Robert Kittle (ist sub.), . 


100.00 


George Gibson, . . 


50.00 


John E. Russell, . . . 


200.00 


Jesse Ralph, . . . . 


100.00 


Thomas Mathews, . . . 


100.00 


Asher P. Nichols, . 


100.00 


Charles W. Evans (ist sub.). 


600.00 


Jacob A. Barker (ist sub.). 


400.00 


James P. Provoost, . . . 


500.00 


E. L. Stevenson, . . . 


1,000.00 


Albert H. Tracy, . . 


1,000.00 


Walter Joy, ... 


1,000.00 


Sheldon Thompson (2d sub.), 


400.00 


William Williams (2d sub.). 


400.00 


James D. Sheppard (2d sub.). 


100.00 


Jacob A. Barker (2d sub.). 


100.00 


A. I. Mathews (2d sub.), . 


100.00 


Nelson Willard (2d sub.) . 


100.00 


Wm. H. Walker (2d sub.), 


25.00 


Robert Kittle (2d sub.), . 


25.00 


A. H. Caryl (2d sub.), . . 


100.00 


Philo Dubois (2d sub.). 


100.00 


Stephen Walker (2d sub.), . 


50.00 


G. B. Webster (ist sub.), . 


2,500.00 


Lewis Eaton 


300.00 


Silas Sawin, ... 


300.00 


Ira A. Blossom (2d sub.), . 


100.00 


Wm. A. Thompson, . . 


300.00 


Charles W. Evans (2d sub.). 


200.00 


George C. Webster (ist sub.). 


400.00 


C. L. Brace (per L. B.), . 


200.00 


Jeremiah Staats 


200.00 



Subscription Lists. 



429 



B. C. Caryl, 1 

N. H. Warner, \ ■ ■ 


. $ 500.00 


Charles W. Evans (3d sub.) 


. $ 200.00 


A. I. Mathews (3d sub.), . 


150.00 


William Shelton 


500.00 


Wm. H. Walker (3d sub.) . 


100.00 


Geo. C. Webster (2d sub.), 


100.00 


James V. DeWitt, . 


200.00 


Wm. Williams (3d sub.), . 


700.00 


David Forbey, . . . 


50.00 


G. B. Webster (2d sub.), 
Geo. S. Burns, . . 


. 1,000.00 


John Hebard (2d sub.), 


50.00 


100.00 












$48,870.00 


See pages 52 and 53. 









A condensed form of the above list will be found at page 53, in 
which the total amounts given by each subscriber are summarized. 
The list is given above in its original form as an object lesson, to show 
how St. Paul's was built — the same persons giving again and again 
as the need arose, often under circumstances involving much personal 
self-denial, which was very real in the business conditions of the small 
city of Buffalo of those days. It must be remembered that the popu- 
lation of Buffalo in 1850 was only 42,261. 



The general feeling among the parishioners in regard to the build- 
ing of the new church is well expressed in the following extract from 
an address delivered by William H. Walker, at the Christmas dinner 
(1849) of the "Junior Vestry." (See page 57.) 

"The parish of St. Paul's in which it has been our good fortune to be 
trained, has experienced many changes within six years; it has increased largely in 
number, in communicants, and in liberality. Age has not destroyed its energies, for 
now, with the vigor and zeal of youth, it has addressed itself to a new and glorious 

enterprise, the erection of a spacious and imposing House of Prayer a church 

complete and beautiful in its proportion, where we shall find ' sermons in stones ' and 
the Prayer Book speaking to us from every part, from the firm foundation to the 
heavenward pointing spire. May we all live to hear the glorious music from its chimes, 
and in years to come listen to them with hearts in unison with their peaceful and solemn 
tones." . . . 



SUBSCRIPTION, 1851. 

"We, the undersigned, hereby agree to give our notes to the Treasurer of St. 
Paul's Parish, payable at some bank in the City of Buffalo, for the amount set opposite 



430 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



our names in three equal payments at five, seven, and nine months from this date, 
without interest, for the purpose of finishing St. Paul's Church. For which notes we 
agree to receive certificates from said Treasurer, bearing interest after said notes are 
paid, and redeemable in stock in said church or money, as we shall elect at the time of 
sale of slips in said church. 

Buffalo, January 4, 1851. 



John W. Williams, 

Samuel D. Flagg, 

Geo. E. Hayes, 

Louisa M. Weed and DeWitt 

C. Weed, . . 
Elijah Ford, . . 
John L. Kimberly, 
E. S. Warren, . . 
J. B. Bull, . . 
A. E. Hart, 
James D. Sheppard, 
Sheldon Thompson, 
George Truscott, 
I. T. Hatch, . . . 
John Pease, 
Benjamin Bradley, 



$700.00 
500.00 
500.00 

500.00 
500.00 
600.00 
600.00 
600.00 
300.00 
300.00 
1,000.00 
300.00 
600.00 
200.00 
300.00 



H. K. Smith, . 


I300.00 


Lester Brace, 


. . 300.00 


Reported to the vestry Jan- 


uary 14, 1851, . 


$8,100.00 


Charles W. Evans, 


300.00 


Russell H. Heywood, 


. . 300.00 


DeWitt C. Weed, . . 


300.00 


John W. Williams, . . 


. . 300.00 


A. Porter Thompson, 


300.00 


Walter Joy, . 


. . 300.00 


Amasa Mason, .... 


200.00 






Reported to the vestry 


Octo- 


ber4, 1851, . . 


$2,000.00 



Am't subscribed in this way, $10,100.00 



St. Paul's Church Building Fund Association, commonly known as 
the Young Men's Fund, although many women of the parish were 
among the subscribers, was organized October 24, 1847, and, therefore, 
preceded the foregoing subscriptions. The subscribers to this fund 
agreed that it should be paid over to the vestry when the vestry 
should have raised ten thousand dollars towards building the new St. 
Paul's. This fund was paid over to the vestry in the year 1850. The 
total amount contributed to the fund was $1,372.65, in small sums 
averaging about $5.00. In January, 1848, the young ladies of the 
parish also formed their association for the same object. (See note 
foot of page 58 ) 



Subscription Lists. 



431 



Subscriptions towards the completion of the church edifice, main 
tower, porches, Sunday School room, etc., dated January 11, 1854 : 



Louisa M. Weed, 
DeWitt C, Weed, 
A. I. Mathews, . 
Thomas Savage, . 
John L. Kimberly, 
Joseph Stringham, 
William Shelton, . 
Elijah Ford, . . 
Matthew Wilson, 
Charles W. Evans, 
John Pease. 
Asa E. Hart, . 
Stephen Walker, 
Sylvia Chapin, 
Amasa Mason, 
Sevilla B. Hayden, 
H. S. Chamberlain, 
Lester Brace, . . 
Philander Hodge, 
Curtiss L. Brace, . 
S. H. Grosvenor, 
John S. Ganson, . 
George E. Hayes, 
E. S. Warren, 
Agnes Warren, 



^1,500.00 

1,500.00 

1,000.00 

150.00 

1,500.00 

200.00 

500.00 

1,000.00 

100.00 

600.00 

300.00 

300.00 

250.00 

50 00 

500.00 

200.00 

200 00 

250.00 

100,00 

200.00 
100.00 
500.00 
500.00 
600.00 
500.00 



Benjamin Bradley, . 
Lydia Pomeroy, . 
N. H. Warner, . . 

B. C. Caryl, . . . 

A. P. Nichols, 
S G. Cornell, 
Henry Hagar, . . 
Charles D. Gibson, . 
John T. Lacy, . . 
George Truscott, 
Sidney Shepard, . . 
William Sutton, 

C. C. Wyckoff, . 
Walter W. Stanard, . 
Elizabeth L. Gwinn, 
S. M. Chamberlain, 
I. Chamberlain, . 

B. F. Greene, . . . 
George N. Burwell, 
Samuel D. Flagg, 

G. F. Pratt, . . 
A. Porter Thompson, 
R. H. Hey wood, 
Jacob A. Barker, 



$500.00 
300.00 
150.00 
150.00 
100.00 

50.00 
400.00 

50.00 
100.00 
150.00 
100.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 

15.00 
100.00 

25.00 
250.00 
250.00 
400.00 
100.00 
. 1,000.00 
2,000.00 
300.00 

$19,490.00 



To be added to these is a subscription of $265 (^50) from the 
Rev. Thomas Bowdler of London, England, included in the report of 
the building committee, April 5, 1855. (See page 270.) 

Also, the proceeds of the " Young Ladies' Fair," held in February, 
1854. (See page 80.) 

For subscriptions reported July, 1856 ($6,600), see page 84. 



432 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



Subscriptions for completing the main spire, crosses and finials of 
the church, interior improvements, etc., and also to discharge a debt of 
$3,500 upon the rectory. 

Dated September 19, 1866. 

William Shelton $2,000.00 

DeWitt C. Weed 1,000.00 

Wm. H. Walker, . . . 1,000.00 

Mrs. Caroline Sanford, ... 5.00 

Mrs. Mary Ann Duff, . . 7.00 

Louisa M. Weed 300.00 

Lord Bishop of Gibraltar, . 10.00 

Ezekiel Birdseye, . . . 10.00 

Charles W. Evans, .... 600.00 
James Sweeney, . . $ 50 1 

Wm. B. Depew, . . 50 !• 500.00 
John S. Ganson, . 400 ) 

John T. Lacy, 500.00 

Asher P. Nichols, . . 500.00 

Hobart Weed, . ... 200.00 

H. C. Squier, . .... 200.00 

Henry Shelton Sanford, . . 500.00 
S. G. Cornell, ) 

S. D. Cornell, | ■ ■ • • 2.°°o-oo 

Nelson Willard, . . . 50.00 

Claud Hamilton, 25.00 

L. C. Woodruff 2,000.00 

John Pease . 100.00 

John Pease, Jr., . . 50.00 

James Pease 10.00 

E. B. Seymour, . . . 300.00 

Henry T. Gillet, . . 100.00 

J. B. Dubois, . .... 100.00 

Wm. Squires, . ... 30.00 

Geo. E. Hayes 300.00 

G. F, Pratt, 100.00 

James M. Weed, 25.00 



Geo. H. Bryant, . 
Thos. C. Pitkin, . 
Thos. H. Pitkin, . 
George N. Burwell, 
Clark B. Lacy, 
John T. Lacy, Jr., 
Wm. Lacy, 
A. A. Gillet, . . 
Philo DuBois, . . 
Matthew O'Neill, 
Geo. W. Wallace, 
George L. Burns, 
Laetitia P. Viele, 
Jane Wey Grosvenor, 
Edward Kimberly, 
John L. Kimberly, 
James W. Brown, 
Thomas Hickman, 
S. Squier, . . . 
J. B. Bull, . . . 
Thomas F. Rochester, 
Curtiss L. Brace, 
James F. Demarest, 
Asa E. Hart, . . . 
Henry Bull, . . . 

0. H. P. Champlin, 

1. T. Hatch, . . . 
John B. Seymour, 
Mrs. Amelia Chapin Pickering, 
Mrs. Harriet F. Tracy, 
James Patterson, . . 
Chas. J. Hubbard, . 



$200.00 

100.00 

50.00 

300.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

50.00 

100.00 

20.00 

25.00 

50.00 

400.00 

25.00 

100.00 

300.00 

500.00 

5.00 

250.00 

200.00 

350-00 

100.00 

50.00 

100.00 

100,00 

18.00 

100.00 

25.00 

50.00 

500.00 

100.00 

50.00 



$16,815.00 

The subscription of the Bishop of Gibraltar, included in above list, 
was a piece of gold, which, he requested should be used to pay for 
" a stone in St. Paul's." 



Subscription Lists. 



433 



It was handed to Dr. Shelton in Naples, Italy, while he was the 
bishop's guest, in October, 1864. Dr. Shelton mentions the gift in his 
European Diary ; and in a note, appended to a historical sermon, 
delivered by him February 19, 1867, and afterwards published, he says : 
"When the steeple is complete there will be a stone in it with the 
initials of the See and the name of the donor." 

According to English authorities, the Right Reverend Walter John 
Trower, D. D., was Bishop of Glasgow and Galloway from 1848 until 
his resignation in 1859. After ofificiating for a time as sub-dean of 
Exeter Cathedral, he became in 1863 the second Bishop of Gibraltar, 
resigning that See in 1868. From 1871 until his death, October 24, 
1877, he was rector of Ashington, Sussex. Bishop Trower was the 
author of a number of works relating to the Church. Bishop C. A. 
Harris succeeded him in the See of Gibraltar in 1868. (See page 318.) 



Subscriptions for completing the church, etc. 
Dated April 5, 1869. 



$1 

T 
I 
I 

I 



William Shelton, . . . 

Samuel G. Cornell, . 

William H. Walker, 

A. P. Thompson, . . 

L. C. Woodruff, . 

Rt. Rev. Arthur Cleveland Coxe, 

DeWitt C. Weed, .... 

Cyrus Clarke 

John T. Lacy, . ... 

Charles W. Evans, .... 

E. B. Seymour 

H. C. Squier, 



000.00 
,000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
,000.00 
100.00 
500.00 
500.00 
500.00 
300. 00 
100.00 
100.00 



Agnes Warren, 
Miss Wells, . . 
Nelson Willard, . . 
Asa E. Hart, . . 
Fred. W. Newbould, 
James Sweeney, . 
Edvfard C. Walker, . . 
Mrs. John L. Kimberly, 
Geo. H. Bryant, . . . 
John B. Hurray, . . . 
Elizabeth McKee, 



I200.00 

2.00 

20.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

5.00 

50.00 

100.00 

100.00 

50.00 
^7,927.00 



434 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



Subscriptions for building the spire of small tower, stone crosses, 
finials, etc. 

Dated May 23, 187 1. 



William Shelton, . 


. . $100.00 


Geo. H. Bryant, . . 


. . $100.00 


Cyrus Clarke, . . . 


100.00 


DeWitt C. Weed, . 


100.00 


Henry T. Gillet, 


100.00 


Geo. W. Smith, . . . 


50.00 


M. B. Moore, . . . 


50.00 


Wm. H. Walker, . 


100.00 


H. H. Baker, .... 


. . 50.00 


J. N. Dorris, . . 


. . ICO. 00 


Charles W. Evans, 


100.00 


L. C. Woodruff, . . 


100.00 


John T. Lacy, . . . 


50.00 


C. C. Wyckoff, . . 


50.00 




$1,150.00 



For subscription, 1878-1881, amounting to $12,928.81, to defray 
certain indebtedness of the parish, see pages 131, 132. 

For the subscription, amounting to over $60,000.00, for rebuilding 
the church after the fire of 1888, see page 176. 

For subscription, 1895, for new rectory, see page 200. 



SUBSCRIBERS TO THE PARISH HOUSE BUILDING FUND, 1896. 



William H. Walker, 
Mrs. Agnes L. Warren, 
Mrs. Laetitia P. Viele, 
A. Porter Thompson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Edmund 

Hayes, 
Miss Amelia Stevenson, 
Mrs. Charles W. Evans, 
Mr. and Mrs. James Swee- 
ney, 
James Sweeney, Jr., 
Miss Louisa Weed Sweeney, 
Mrs. George E. Hayes, 
Mrs. Jane W. Grosvenor, 
Miss Lucretia S. Grosvenor, 



Miss Abby W. Grosvenor, 
Mr. and Mrs. William H. 

Glenny, 
S. Douglas Cornell, 
Mrs. Grace A. Grant, 
James R. Smith, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Hutch- 
inson, 
James M. Smith, 
Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon T. 

Viele, 
Mrs. Catherine Cottier, 
Miss M. Elizabeth Cottier, 
Dr. and Mrs. Henry R. Hop- 
kins, 



Mr. and Mrs. H. C. nar- 
rower. 

Miss Katherine G. nar- 
rower, 

Charles R. Wilson, 

Miss Esther Glenny, 

W. Harry Glenny, 

Hobart Weed, 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ben- 
nett, 

Miss Keturah B. Greene, 

Mr. and Mrs. William Y. 
Warren, 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick B. 
Robins, 



Subscription Lists. 



435 



Mrs. Robert P. Wilson, 

Mrs. Mary H. Lee, 

Dr. and Mrs. Matthew D. 

Mann, 
Mr. and Mrs. O. H. P. 

Champlin, 
Miss Carrie M. Champlin, 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard H. 

Baker, 
Miss Helen L. Baker, 
Howard A. Baker, 
George H. Baker, 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. 

Joyce, 
John D. Smith Company, 
Edward C. Walker, 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. 

Warren, 
Derrick B. Warren, 
Mrs. Laetitia V. W. Has- 

brouck, 
T. D. Sheridan, 
Miss Elizabeth A. McKee, 
John Pease, 
Miss Sarah M. Pease, 
Robert Ferguson, 
Miss Eliza Gorman, 
Miss Mary Gorman, 
Miss Nancy Gorman, 
Miss Jane Gorman, 
Mr. and Mrs. William H. 

Faxon, 
Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Cald- 
well, 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dev- 

ereux, 
Thos. S. King, 
John T. Gard's family, 
Sheldon Thompson, 



Dr. and Mrs. G. Hunter 
Bartlett, 

Miss Virginia Evans Bart- 
lett, 

Evans EUicott Bartlett, 

Merritt F. Cook, 

Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Perry 
Champlin, Jr., 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver H. P. 
Champlin, 2d, 

Herbert H. Embry, 

H. J. Warren, 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Barton, 

George Alfred Stringer, 

William J. Wolfe, 

Mrs. Amelia H. Lee, 

Amelia H. Lee, 2d, 

Mrs. Ann M. Ganson, 

Miss Katharine H. Bristol, 

Mrs. Ann J. Rose, 

Mrs. Mary Carlisle Dames, 

Francis C. Dames, 

Mrs. Elizabeth S. Mendsen, 

Miss Jennette White, 

Jerome Brandon Richmond, 

Miss Margaret Brandon 
Richmond, 

Miss Grace Montague Rich- 
mond, 

Miss Grace Viele, 

Dorr Viele, 

Miss Anna Viele, 

Miss Laetitia Viele, 

Sheldon K. Viele, 

Mrs. Margaret L. Larke, 

Mrs. Maria P. Vosburgh, 

Matthew O'Neill, 

Miss Alice J. Thompson, 

Mrs. Jennie M. H. Barton, 



Fred. H. Barton, 

Theodore Vosburgh, 

C. N. Riggs, 

Carleton Greene, 

Dr. Bernard Bartow, 

Dr. and Mrs. F. Park Lewis, 

Charles W. Hinson, 

Miss Sarah M. Hinson, 

Miss Annie Currie, 

Mrs. Thomas King Mann, 

Mrs. Martin Lautz, 

Mrs. H. Smith, 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. 
Marvin, 

Mrs. Oliver Watson, 

Dr. and Mrs. F. W. Abbott, 

Mrs. Rebecca N. Hall, 

Henry Bull, 

Henry Adsit Bull, 

Mrs. E. F. Meister, 

Mrs. L. Broad, 

Mrs. E. C. W. O'Brien, 

Mrs. Anna Berry, 

Mrs. Fanny A. Bull, 

W. S. Tremame, 

Mrs. John L. Crosthwaite, 

Mr. and Mrs. H. R. How- 
land, 

Mrs. Charles R. \A'alker, 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Walker, 

J. Tillinghast, 

Miss Carrie E. B. Neill, 

Dr. Thomas Lothrop, 

Mrs. L. M. Diehl, 

Mrs. L. J. Pope, 

Miss Juba M. Pfeiffer, 

F. H. Blackmon, 

N. Orsini de Bock, 



436 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



J. C. Milsom, 
Miss Ethel Mann, 
Mrs. M. W. Graham, 
Wm. Warren Smith, 
Mrs. William T. Miller, 
Miss Genevieve E. Mor- 
row, 
Miss E. Maude Morrovif, 
Miss Mary L. Raiber, 
Mrs. K. R. Willett, 
Miss M. Westcott, 
Mrs. Jane Andrews, 
Mrs. Geo. P. Germain, 
Mrs. Schenkelberger, 
Miss Alice Schenkelberger, 
Mrs. E. L. Baker, 
Miss C. Anna Williams, 
Mrs. A. D. Gail, 
Miss R. J. Gardner, 
Miss Mary F. Houghton, 
Miss Alice M. Hopkins, 
Chauncey Depew, 
Mrs. Wm. B. Depew, 
Mrs. C. K. Harrington, 
Miss Adelaide M. Wilson, 
Mrs. Annie M. Mitchell, 
Miss Lillian R. Richmond, 
J. R. H. Richmond, 
Mrs. Rosalie H. Wright, 
Mrs. Maria G. Atwater, 
Miss Julia Atwater, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. T. At- 
water, 
Miss Alice Hopkins, 
Miss Helen Hopkins, 
Miss Frances Eldred, 
Miss Mabel Wright, 
Miss Florence Adsit, 
George C. Greene, 



Dr. and Mrs. Peter C. Cor- 
nell, 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank I. Dorr, 

Mrs. Mary E. Stimpson, 

Charley Stimpson, 

Howard Wade, 

Mrs. Evelyn S. P. Dorr, 

Mrs. Allen Jones, 

Miss Adelaide K. Rich- 
mond, 

Mrs. Nelson White, 

Miss Mary N. Dorr, 

R. J. Bennett, 

Jack Green, 

Geo. E. Messer, Jr., 

Sheldon Burt, 

Gertrude Cashmere, 

Frank Cash more, 

Ida Cashmore, 

Bessie Cashmore, 

C. M. Cashmore, 

Hattie J. Mason, 

Florence L. Masten, 

Mary L. Elampton, 

Florence Taylor Smith, 

George A. Clark, 

Miss Carroll, 

Anna H. Squibb, 

Mrs. Hobart Weed, 

Walter I. Weed, 

Shelton Weed, 

Miss Martha W. Hutchin- 
son, 

Mrs. John C. Devereux, 

John A, Devereux, 

John H. Cooper, 

James A. Hawley, 

William Wippert, 

Mrs. WooUey, 



Mr. and Mrs. Philip S. 

Smith, 
Mrs. Sarah E. Bryant, 
Mrs. John L. Bryant, 
Miss Sarah E. Bryant, 
Miss Carrie C. Reitz, 
Miss Bessie S. Cooper, 
Mrs. F. K. Vine, 
Miss M. Hunter, 
Miss Elizabeth Brinkmann, 
Miss Mary Graham Tucker, 
Miss Emma McDonald, 
Mrs. F. McDonald, 
Mrs. M. L. Sutphin, 
Mrs. Fanny E. Harris, 
Misses Persch, 
Miss Gertrude B. Spauld- 

ing. 
S. M. Dewey, 
Paul Carris, 
Carrie P. Whalen, 
Miss Gertrude L. House, 
M. Belle King, 
Anna M. Rings, 
Minnie M. Rings, 
A. Eliza Hamilton, 
Mrs. John Coit, 
Mrs. Charles H. Cushman, 
Mary Carter, 
Mr. and Mrs. William B. 

Gallagher, 
Mrs. Streater and daughters, 
Mrs. Julia W. Smith, 
Mrs. M. A. Crockett, 
Mrs. Frances R. Hunsicker, 
Miss S. E. Kimberly, 
Miss Charlotte Kimberly 
Mrs. Dewitt C. Weed, 
George T. Weed, 



Subscription Lists. 



437 



Edward L. 



Mr. and Mrs, 

Kimberly, 
Miss Louise Kimberly, 
Miss Kate S. Weed, 



Miss Edith K. Weed, Edward J. Prehn, 

M. K. Lewis, W. A. Hawley, 

Robert Palen, Frank Gedies, 

George T. Ballachey, A. L. Jones. 

Total amount of subscriptions, $20,730.61. 



SUBSCRIBERS TO THE FUND FOR PAYING OFF THE MORTGAGE ON THE 
NEW PARISH HOUSE, THE FLOATING INDEBTEDNESS 

OF ST. Paul's, etc., 1900-1902. 



William H. Walker, 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund 
Hayes, 

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Hutch- 
inson, 

Mrs. J. M. Richmond and 
family. 

Miss Amelia Stevenson, 

Mr. and Mrs. Hobart Weed, 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip S. 
Smith, 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Y. War- 
ren, 

Mrs. Robert P. Wilson, 

Charles R. Wilson, 

A. P. Thompson, 

Mrs. Charles W. Evans, 

Mrs. Geo. E. Hayes, 

James R. Smith, 

Mrs. P. P. Burtis, 

Miss Susan E. Kimberly, 

Dr. Thos. Lothrop, 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Douglas 
Cornell, 

Miss L. S. Grosvenor, 

Miss A. W. Grosvenor, 



W. H. Glenny, 

Mrs. Lucy H. Weed, 

George T. Weed, 

Miss Kate S. Weed, 

Miss Edith Weed, 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. R. 
Joyce, 

James Sweeney, 

Dr. Henry Reed Hopkins, 

H. C. Harrower, 

Miss Katherine G. Har- 
rower, 

Mrs. Edward Bennett, 

Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Warren, 

Mrs. Julia W. Smith, 

Wm. Warren Smith, 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. H. Fax- 
on, 

Robert Palen, 

Mr. and Mrs. Marshall J. 
Root, 

Shelton Weed, 

Howard H. Baker, 

Walter I. Weed, 

Mrs. Mary H. Lee, 

John K. Walker, 



Mr. and Mrs. Geo. H. Har- 
rower, 

Miss Catherine McVickar, 

Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon T. 
Viele, 

Geo. C. Greene, 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard A. 
Forman, 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. B. Gal- 
lagher, 

Dr. and Mrs. Alexander M. 
Curtiss, 

Mrs. Alice O. Mann, 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Nagel, 

John H. Cooper, 

Wm. H. Walker, Jr., 

Mrs. J. C. Devereux, 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. 
Baker, 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. T. At- 
water, 

Mr. and Mrs. Ganson Depew, 

Dr. F. Park Lewis, 

Mrs. J. H. Lee, 

DeWitt Clinton, 

Mrs. Streater and daughters, 



438 



History of St. Paul's Church. 



Henry English, 
Edward F. Meister, 
Stephen' Walker, 
John M. Provoost, 
Walter Devereux, Jr., 
Maxwell S. Wheeler, 
Mrs. C. J. Fisher, 
Miss Virginia Evans Bart- 

lett, 
Evans EUicott Bartlett, 
Mrs. Thomas Rose, 
E. Corning Townsend, 
Miss Grace E. Meredith, 
Miss Anna M. Rings, 
George Stevenson Fenton, 
Miss Emma U. Sears, 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Adsit 

Bull, 
Lester Wheeler, 
Miss Elizabeth Brinkmann, 
Geo. T. Ballachey, 
Miss Julie M. Pfeiffer, 
Mrs. Kate Cottier, 
Wm. A. Faxon, 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Bret 

Hart, 
Sheldon Thompson, 
G. Frederick Ogilvie, 
J. Sweeney, Jr., 
Mrs. Norman E. Mack, 
Mr. and Mrs. H. R. How- 
land, 
Norman Rogers, 
George A. Clark, 
S. G. Walker, 
Mrs. J. H. Dames, 
Sullivan A. Meredith, 
The Misses Persch, 
Mrs. Sue C. Perkins, 



Miss Sabin Perkins, 
Mrs. M. A. Crockett, 
Mrs. R. S. Smithwick, 
Wm. J. Wolfe, 
Lorenzo Harris, 
Miss M. C. Lovering, 
Robert M. Codd, Jr., 
Miss Gertrude Lee House, 
Mrs. Alice A. Howard, 
Miss Marjorie Howard, 
Mrs. W. S. Sizer, 
Dr. M. D. Mann, 
William Wippert, 
Miss Adeline Campbell, 
Mrs. A. D. Stewart, 
Miss Eva E. Rugg, 
Miss Ida J. Stickney, 
Miss Emma J. Thomas, 
Clarence D. Rogers, 
Mrs. Howard J. Vigrass, 
Miss Ruth E. Isaacs, 
Byron M. Tattle, 
Miss Florence M. Filstead, 
Mrs. William Spears, 
Miss E. Maude Morrow, 
Miss Genevieve E. Morrow. 
Miss M. Belle King, 
Mrs. Mary Shenkelberger, 
Miss Alice A. Shenkelber- 
ger, 
Miss C. Anna Williams, 
Miss Julia K. Klein, 
Miss Emma Klein, 
Miss Ida M. Klein, 
Miss Bertha Klein, 
Mrs. Frank Burt, 
Dr. Fred. A. Ballachey, 
Mrs. Jemima Jones, 
Miss Mary E. Tench, 



Louis N, Smith, 

James Hornibrook, 

John Reitz, 

Miss Fannie Harris, 

Miss Sarah M. Hinson, 

Howard A. Baker, 

George A. Baker, 

Mrs. Alfred Campbell, 

Mrs. E. S. Traenkle, 

A. S. Traenkle. 

G. R. Traenkle, 

Estate of Dr. F. W. Abbott, 

W. L. Moffat, 

Mrs. John D. Larkin, 

Mrs. Louisa E. Fowler, 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tal- 

boys and children, 
Joseph S. Abbs, 
Mrs. J. J. Huber, 
Mrs. L. M. Burgstahler, 
Miss Georgia M. Filstead, 
Miss Ella M. Wall, 
Mrs. Jane A. Andrews, 
Mrs. Kate Kee Knowles, 
Mrs. E. C. W. O'Brien, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. 

Marvin, 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. H. 

Marvin, 
Miss Eunice Henderson, 
Mrs. Ashley Smith, 
Miss Louise De Langie, 
Miss Mary E. Walker, 
Mrs. Margaret L. Larke, 
Mrs. A. D. Gail, 
Mrs. Gififord Morgan, 
Mrs. Catherine Dixon, 
Charles Wood, 
L. G. Sellstedt, 



Subscription Lists. 



439 



Miss Sarah M. Pease, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Barton, 
Miss Julia Atwater, 
Miss Mary F. Houghton, 
Miss Katherine M. Hurl- 
burt. 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank I. Dr. and Mrs. Bernard Bar- 



Dorr, 
Mrs. Harriet Smith, 
Dr. and Mrs. Allen 

Jones, 
George Alfred Stringer, 



tow, 
Mrs. Lucy Broad, 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Mendsen, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Whalen, 
Miss E. L. Small. 



Total amount, $28,813.75. 



The above subscription has freed the parish of St. Paul's from debt, 
with the exception of the balance due on the rectory in Johnson's Park. 
(See pages 200, 241, 243.) 



440 History of St. Pai^Ll's Church. 

Iln Conclusion. 

In the great increase of Buffalo, and its growth northward, St. 
Paul's has been left alone, stranded as it were in the heart of the 
business portion of the city. The " daughter churches," Trinity and 
St. John's, have followed their parishioners up-town. Trinity, first, hav- 
ing removed from the old building on the southeast corner of Wash- 
ington and Mohawk streets into the beautiful brown-stone church 
edifice on the east side of Delaware Avenue between Tupper and 
Edward streets. The members of St. John's some time ago sold 
the old church property on the southeast corner of Washington and 
Swan streets, and have built a new grey-stone chapel on the north- 
east corner of Lafayette Avenue and Bidwell Parkway, which was 
opened by the bishop, November 5, 1893. They hope to build a large 
church there in the near future. 

The old First Presbyterian Church, which was for so many years the 
neighbor of St. Paul's on the opposite lot, .between Niagara and 
Church streets, and which, with St. Paul's, gave the name of " the 
churches " to that portion of Main Street, has disappeared, and in its 
place stands the lofty and imposing gray-stone building of the Erie 
County Savings Bank. The First Church congregation now worships 
in its stately brown-stone edifice on The Circle. 

St. Paul's alone remains the same ; the same massive, brown-stone 
walls, the same graceful, tapering spire, with its gilded cross, losing 
itself in the clouds. The triangular block of ground which it occupies 
seems also little changed, with its high iron fence, and grass-covered 
space within, making a pleasant spot in the midst of the dusty, busy 
city. And yet, so much have the surroundings changed, and so dif- 
ferent seems the life of the streets around it, that even " Dr. Shelton's 
St. Paul's '' seems a thing of the distant past, and it is almost impossi- 
ble for the oldest parishioners to call up a mental vision of the little 
frame church, which stood long ago on the same spot, with the foot- 
paths leading to it from the surrounding village streets. 




ST PAUL'S AND ITS EN\TRON.MENT, N.ivembur, 1002. (See] 
Photographs b) G. H. ]■ 



~^. 219. 221J, 2^'I. 



In Conclusion. 441 

Buffalo from a tiny village has grown into a great, thriving, and pros- 
perous city, the population in 1903 being about 400,000 ; and the parish 
of St. Paul's has grown with it. As we think of the small beginnings, 
comparing them with the present prosperity, and look forward to the 
great work which St. Paul's has yet to do in the future of this rapidly- 
growing city, the words from Isaiah, which Dr. Shelton used as the 
text for his farewell sermon, in the old frame edifice, March 17, 
1850, come to us with ever greater force, — truly, "A little one shall 
become a thousand, and a small one a strong nation." 

" For not like kingdoms of the world 

The holy Church of God ! 
Though earthquake-shocks be rocking it, 

And tempest is abroad ; 
Unshaken as eternal hills, 

Unmovable it stands, 
A mountain that shall fill the earth, 

A fane unbuilt by hands. 

" Though years fling ivy over it, 

Its cross peers high in air, 
And reverend with majestic age, 

Eternal youth is there ! 
Oh mark her holy battlements, 

And her foundations strong ; 
And hear, within, her ceaseless voice, 

And her unending song ! 

" Oh ye, that in these latter days 
The citadel defend, 
Perchance for you, the Saviour said 

I'm with you — to the end ; 
Stand, therefore, girt about, and hold 

Your burning lamps in hand, 

And standing, listen for your Lord, 

And till He cometh — stand ! " 

—From "Chelsea," by Bishop Coxe. 



1fn&ef. 



Unbey. 



To avoid unnecessary repetition, the separate names in tlie following 
lists have not been indexed: 



List of Wardens and Vestrymen, 1817-1903, 
Subscription Lists, . . . . 



Pages 397 to 420. 
Pages 426 to 439. 



The Table of Contents and List of Illustrations will be found at front of volume. 



Aaron, Rev. Dr. Israel (gives use of the 
Temple Beth Zion to St. Paul's after Are 
of 1888), 1G8, 190. 
Abbott, Dr. and Mrs. Frank W., 177, 266, 

256. 
Abbott, Dr. Frank W., 193. 
Obituary, 256. 
Memorial to, 256, 262, 292. 
Abbott, Frank Wayne, Jr., 231, 246. 
Adam, Carl, 343. 
Adams, John, Ex-President U. S., death 

of (1826), services at St. Paul's, 28. 
Adams, Lawson, 316. 

Adams, Rev. Henry A., Seventh Rector 
(1889), 180, 183, 190, 351, 360 (Clergy List), 
396. 
Resignation, 191. 
Short Account of, 192. 
Advent, Monday (new day of election of 

Vestry, 1896), 202, 213. 
Aiken, David D., 26. 
Albany, N. Y., 17, 27, 170, 257, 265, 425. 
Aldermen, Board of, Resolutions in regard 

to Shelton Square, 219, 220. 
Allen, Miss Amanda, 326. 
Allen, Carlyle T., 

In Buffalo, 1829, 42. 
Died, 1902, 42. 
Allen family, 385. 
Allen, George W., 42, 55. 
Allen, Hon. Lewis F., 

Reference to letter, 169. 
Quotation from his paper on " City of 
Ararat" in regard to Rev. Mr. 
Searle, 363. ^ ^ 

Extracts from his letter m regard to 
"City of Ararat," 366, 367, 368, 369. 
He knew Dr. Shelton in 1829, 374. 
His article on "Cholera in Buffalo" 
(1832), 376. 



Allen, William K., 131. 
All Saints' Church, Buffalo, 184. 
Alms Basin, The, 
Saved at fire, 167. 
Description of, 291. 
(Memorial to Mrs. John Pease.) 
Altar (1850), 71. 
Altar, The, 276, 277. 

Present Altar (1889), a memorial to 

Rev. Dr. Shelton, 278. 
Description of, 279, 280, 281, 282. 
Resolutions of Vestry for Mrs. Tracy's 
gift, 395 (see Tracy, Mrs. Agnes 
Ethel). 
Altar ("Crypt Chapel"), 278, 296, 359. 
"Altar and the Hearth" (parish paper; 

(Juotations from), 158, 159. 
Altar cloths and altar linen (cabinet for), 
270. 

Memorial altar cloth, 290. 
Committee on, 248. 
Altar Cross, brass (saved at flre), 167. 
Description and history of, 279, 280, 281. 
Altar Cross, memorial, in "Crypt 
Chapel," 296. 
Altar rail (1830), 71. 
Altar rail, description of, 276. 

Part of memorial to Dr. Shelton, 287. 
Design of, 394. 
Altar rail in "Crypt Chapel," old, 278. 
Altar Society, 248. 
Altar Vases, 290. 
Alvord, Elihu (on Organization Paper, 

1817), 9. 
Amsterdam (Holland), 19, 29. 

(See New Amsterdam.) 
Anderson, Miss, 337, 338, 342, 343. 
Ararat, City of, (laying of corner stone 
In St. Paul's, 1825), 27, 320, 363, 364, 
366, 367, 368, 369. 



445 



446 



Index. 



Architects oi Saint Paul's, The, 421 to 426. 
Ascension, Church of the, BuiSalo, 58, 101, 
168. 
Choir, 184, 185, 207, 214, 338. 
Organized (1865), 302. 
Ascension Day, 1888 (St. Paul's destroyed 

by fire), 166. 
"Ascension Day, 1888" (Poem by Edith 

Baton), 166. 
Associate Board, Church Home, 249. 
Association, Building Fund (1847), 68, 258, 

430. 
Association, Chime Fund, 85, 258, 299, 301. 
Association, St. Paul's Church Bell-Ring- 
ing, 304, 306. 
Athearn, Cyrus, 30, 35, 43. 

Vestryman, 31, 42, 43. 
Athearn family, 385. 
Athletic Association, Boys', 248. 
Atwater, Edward M., 

Vestryman, 89. 
Atwater, Mrs. Edward M., 248. 
Atwater, William T., 233. 
Austin, Stephen G. (in first choir), 15, 25, 

319. 
"Authors of Buffalo," 389. 
Babcock, Rev. Deodatus. 

Second Rector (1820), 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, 

141, 320, 357, 361, 362, 363. 
Clergy List, 396. 
Badger, George (on Organization Paper, 

1817), 9, 10, 18, 141. 
BaiTd, Miss, 387. 
Baker, Everett L. (organist), 327, 328, 329, 

330. 
Baker, Howard A., 233. 
Baker, Howard H., 131, 145, 146, 176, 336, 
343, 384. 
Vestryman, 112, 114, 116, 117, 119, 122, 
123, 126, 130, 136, 139. 
Baker, Mrs. Howard H., 42. 
Baker, John Henry, 233. 
Baker, Moses, 18. 
Ball, Sheldon, 23, 24, 25, 26. 
Ballachey, George T., 233, 246, 249. 
Baltimore, Maryland, 98, 135, 172, 193, 207. 
Bank of England and St. Paul's," 178, 385, 

386. 
Baptism by Immersion, only instance in 

the parish (1825), 26. 
Baptismal Shell (memorial), 291. 
Baptistery, 265, 269, 270, 271, 273. 

Description of, 274, 275, 288. 
Barker, Miss Ella D., 323. 
Barker, Jacob A. (on Organization Paper, 
1817), 9. 
Early Choir, 15, 319. 
Vestryman, 23, 24, 26, 28, 30, 31, 35, 37, 

44, 45, 46, 47, 49, 50. 
Delegate to Convention (1825), 26. 
On Committee to procure "Glebe Lot," 
27, 29, 30. 



Barker, Jacob A. — (Continued.) 

On Committee for Plans (1836), 46. 
Building Committee (1849), 56. 
Building Committee (1865), 81, 83, 101, 

391. 
Treasurer, 57, 62, 78. 
Death (1869), 87. 
Vestry Resolutions, 87. 
See, also: 30, 43, 53, 54, 58, 141, 324, 377, 
385, 391. 
Barker, Pierre A., vestryman, 42, 43, 44, 45, 
46. 
Family, 385. 
Barker, Miss Sarah A., 329, 331. 
Barker, Zenas, 385. 

Barker, Zenas W. (in first congregation), 
10, 30, 43, 386. 
Vestryman, 42, 43, 44, 
Barnard, Albert J., 135, 164, 176, 180, 340, 
343, 348, 362, 396. 

Vestryman, 126, 130, 136, 139, 153, 154, 
165, 157, 163, 175, 187, 188, 192, 196, 199, 
200, 202, 213, 223, 226, 228, 232, 241, 245, 
256. 
Chairman Building Committee (1S88), 
167, 171, 395. 
Barnard, Mrs. Albert J., 176. 
Barnard, Miss Florence, 248. 
Barnard, Louis J., 340. 
Barnard, Miss M., 249. 
Bartlett, G. Hunter, 145, 146, 233. 

Clerk to Vestry, 154, 155, 167, 163, 176, 

187, 189. 
Resigns, 192. 
Bartlett, Mrs. G. Hunter (Alice M. Evans), 

174, 181, 288. 
Bartley, Noel, 246. 
Barton, Benjamin, 64. 
Barton Family, 64. 
Barton, Frederick, 107. 
Barton, James L., 64, 64, 113. 
Barton, Mr. (organist), 323. 
Barton, Mrs. Sarah Maria, 113. 
Bartow, Dr. Bernard, 176. 
Batavia, N. Y., 10, 11, 16, 29, 384. 
Beach, Eben (on Organization Paper, 1817), 

9. 
Beach, George, 322. 
Beals, George, vestryman, 111, 112, 114, 116, 

117. 
Beals, John W., 43. 

Vestryman, 31, 37. 
Beare, Charles H. (organist), 331, 332. 
Beebe, S. P. (on Organization Paper, 1817), 9. 
Beers, Anthony, vestryman, 28, 30. 
Belfry of Great Tower, 32, 166, 270, 299, 300, 
301, 306, 310, 311, 313, 316, 358. 
(See "Great Tower and Spire" and 
"Bells.") 
Belfry of small tower, 32 (see Tower). 
Bells of St. Paul's (see Chimes), 32, 85, 116, 
142, 145, 154, 166, 233, 248, 327, 357, 358. 
Account of, 299 to 313. 



Index. 



447 



Bells of St. Paul's. — (Continued.-^ 

Quotation from "Christian Ballads," 

299. 
Schedule of weights and tones, 300, 301. 
Inscriptions on (taken direct from the 

hells), 302, 303. 
Old bell in small tower, 21, 27, 28, 32, 

59, 72, 142, 303, 357. 
Chimes first rung, 304, 358. 
Dr. Sheltoa's. bequest for bells, 149, 304. 
Bell-ringing Association, 304, 305, 306, 

307, 308, 309. 
Pealing, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309. 
Dr. Shelton's interest in the old Bell- 
ringers of St. Paul's, 305. 
Last time of pealing the bells, 305. 
Chiming, 309 to 311. 
Mechanism for chiming, 309. 
Hammers, 309. 

Quotation from Tennyson, 309. 
Modern Methods, 310. 
Framework for bells, 310. 
Carving and motto in Chimers' room, 

310 312 
Bells' and Poets, 308. 
A snowy Sunday night, 313. 
"The Spirit of the Bells" (poem by Al- 
len G. Bigelow),,313. 
Names of the Bells, 302, 303. 
Chimes were played during the Are, 
166, 312. 
Bennett, David S. (house), 199. 

(See Rectory, Johnson's Park.) 
Bennett, Edward, 176, 200. 
Bennett, Mrs. Edward, 200. 
Bennett, Miss M. A., 353, 355. 
Berkeley, Bishop, 32. 
Berrick, Charles, 171. 

Bible (old) presented to Mrs. Shelton, 105. 
Bible on Lectern in "Crypt Chapel," 297. 
Bielby, Rev. C. F. A., 137, 396. 
Bigdon, John, 18. 
Bigelow, Allen G., 
Poem, 313. 
Choir, 343, 344. 
Bindemann, F. W., 334. 
Bird, William A., 64. 
Bird's-eye View of Buffalo from the spire 

(1870), 108. 
Birge, Miss M. R., 326. 
Bishop, John, 305. 

Bishop's Chair (installed 1867, burned 
1888), 103, 142, 359. 
Position in Chancel, 285. 
Present Chair installed 1889, 285, 395. 
Position in Chancel, 285. 
Bishop's Residence, purchased (1865), 101, 

102. 
BIssell, Bishop (Vermont), 380. 
Bissell, Miss H., 354. . „ , 

Black Rock (formerly a suburb of Buf- 
falo), 17, 18, 24, 26, 28, 42, 64, 111, 141, 
163, 228, 237, 384. 



Blodgett, James R., organist, 328, 330, 

331, 332. 
Blossom, Ira A., 53, 54. 
Bock, de, N. O., 352. 
Bonney, Miss P., 344. 

Book of Common Prayer, 32, 41, 63, 119, 185. 
Book-rest for the Altar, 290, 291. 
Books for Chancel (memorial to Robert 

P. Wilson), 236, 291. 
Booth, G. M., 295. 
Boss, Miss S. A., 326. 
Boughton, Guy C, 352. 
Boughton, Mrs. William H., 363. 
Bowdler, Rev. Thomas, of London, Eng- 
land, Memorial window, 270; subscrip- 
tion (1854), 431. 
Boy Choirs, 329 (see Choirs). 
Boys' Club, 249. 
Boys of Choir, 346, 348. 
Brace, Mrs. Charlotte A., 296. 
Brace, Curtiss L., 53, 296. 
Brace, Frederick Gelston (memorial Brass 

Altar Cross in "Crypt Chapel"), 296. 
Brace, Lester, 53, 54, 63, 296, 322, 323. 
Vestryman, 23, 44, 45, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 

62, 66, 62, 65, 78. 
Warden, 79, 81, 83, 85, 86, 88, 89, 90, 93, 
99, 102, 104, 105, 106. Resigns, 107. 
Death, 107, 111. 

Resolutions of Vestry, 111, 112. 
Brace family, 64, 386. 
Bradley, Benjamin, vestryman, 78, 79. 
Brady, Mr. and Mrs. E. L., 177. 
Brazzi, Madame, 356. 
Brent, Benjamin, 53. 
Brent, Rev. Charles H. 
Assistant, 155, 396. 
Bishop to Philippines (1901), 241, 242. 
Bridgeport, Connecticut, 38, 40, 143, 144, 
149, 381, 382. 
Dr. Shelton's old homestead at, 143, 149, 
162. 
Brinkmann, Miss B., 248. 
Bristol, Henry, 1,77. 
Brown, Andrew, 131. 
Brown, Miss B., 336. 
Brown, David, on Organization Paper 

(1817), 9. 
Brown, Rev. David, 22. 
Brown, James W., 

Vestryman, 93, 99, 102, 103, 104. 
Brown, Rev. John Wesley, D. D. 

Sixth Rector (1882), 133, 135, 136, 359. 

Clergy List, 396. 

Short Biography, 135. 

His Kindness to Dr. Shelton, 164, 369. 

Extracts from his Funeral Sermon on 

Dr. Shelton, 47, 148. 
Extracts from his article on Dr. Shel- 
ton in "American Church Review," 
370, 371, 372. 
Typographical errors in magazine ar- 
ticle, 371, 372. 



448 



Index. 



Brown, Rev. John Wesley, D. D. — (Continued.) 

Extracts from his paper on Dr. Shelton 

read before Buffalo Historical Society, 

372, 373, 374, 375, 376. 

Chaplain o£ 65th Regiment, 349. 

Daily Services instituted at St. Paul's 

(Sept. 1, 1887), 158. 
Dr. Brown and Church Music, 135, 

345. 
Resignation, 163, 164, 350, 359. 
Resolutions of Vestry, 164. 
His sermon at Temple Beth Zion, after 

fire, 169. 
Farewell sermon, 170. 
Rector of St. Thomas's Church, New 

York City, 163, 231. 
Death, 231. 
Resolutions of meeting in New York 

City, 231. 
Portrait bust in St. Thomas's, New 

York, 232. 
Celtic Cross at his grave in Wood- 
lawn Cemetery, 232. 
Obituary, 231. 

General References, 139, 143, 153, 155, 
157, 167, 168, 179, 187, 242, 291, 312, 350, 
369, 372, 376, 393. 
Brown, Mrs. John W., 291. 
Brown, Rev. Percy, 105. 
Brown, Mrs. William 0., Jr. (Mrs. Imo- 

gene Brown), 330, 331, 332, 341. 
Brown & Valentine (contractors for Great 

Spire), 103. 
Brownell, Bishop (of Connecticut), 41, 98, 

377 378 
Bryant, George H., 227. 
Bryant, Mrs. Sarah B. (Mrs. George H.), 
176, 200. 
Obituary, 227. 
Buffalo, 7, 8. 

Burning of, 7, 13, 87, 121, 199, 357, 361. 
Creek, 17. 

Village of, 11, 13, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 24, 
27, 28, 31, 42, 60, 108, 141, 199, 221, 242, 

321, 357, 363, 440. 

Old Fourth of July, 21, 24, 28, 305, 320. 
Incorporated as a City (1832), 44, 257, 

322, 358. 

Prospects of (1828), 373. 

Buffalo in 1830, 384, 385. 

Buffalo in 1850, population, 429. 

Buffalo in 1902, 440, 441. 
Buffalo Academy (old), 267. 
Buffalo Cemeteries, 108, 378. 
"Buffalo Christian Advocate," 67. 
Buffalo City Directories, 369, 389. 
"Buffalo Commercial Advertiser," 59, 109, 
Buffalo Club House, 386. 

319, 362, 389. 
Buffalo Common Schools, 362. 
"Buffalo Emporium," 28. 
"Buffalo Express," 129, 383. 
Buffalo General Hospital, 249, 250. 



Buffalo Historical Society, 258, 362, 363, 368, 
369, 372, 374, 376, 378, 389. 
(See publications of.) 
Buffalo Library, 45, 388. 
"Buffalo Patriot," 21, 320, 368. 
Buffalo to Batavia (roads of 1826), 29. 
Building Committees (1828), 31; (1849) 52, 
56, 67, 59, 422. 

For Rectory (1845), 60, 51; (1854) 79, 80; 
receiving vault (1855), 81; main tower, 
etc., 85. 
Committee of 1866, 103, 315. 
Minutes of Committee, 103, 104, 107. 
Committee for small tower. 111, 115. 
Spire (main), 121. 
After fire (1888), 167. 
Parish House, 203, 218. 
Extracts from minutes of Building 
Committee (1888), 394, 396. 
Building Fund, 180, 196. 
Building Fund Association, 58, 173, 264. 
Bull, Absalom, vestryman, 21. 
Bull, Miss Elizabeth. 

Bequest, 224, 225. 244, 292. 
Bull, George W., 53. 
Bull, Henry, 105, 107, 131, 331. 
Bull, Henry Adsit, 233, 246, 251. 
Bull, Jabez B., 53, 88. 
Burial places in Village of Buffalo, 108, 

378. 
Burning of Buffalo by the British (Decem- 
ber, 1813), 7, 13, 87, 121, 199, 361. 
Burning of St. Paul's, The. 

(See Fire.) 
Burns,